References of "Samuel, Robin 50009791"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailStili di vita, consumo e aspettative future dei giovani adulti in Svizzera
Berger, Lena; Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (0 UL)
See detailStudying Scarring Effects Using Factorial Designs: Rating or Ranking?
Imdorf, Christian; Sacchi, Stefan; Samuel, Robin UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016, November 09)

Early job insecurity is a much-discussed topic across European countries. Research overwhelmingly found that being unemployed after graduation affects employment chances and also future wages negatively ... [more ▼]

Early job insecurity is a much-discussed topic across European countries. Research overwhelmingly found that being unemployed after graduation affects employment chances and also future wages negatively, other research, however, did not find such scarring effects. Some of this mixed evidence may be due to the different ways in which data were collected. Evaluating the effects of potentially stigmatizing applicant characteristics on hiring chances, such as previous unemployment spells, is known to be prone to social desirability bias. Factorial survey experiments (FSE) and forced choice experiments (FCE) have been suggested to alleviate some of these problems. In this workshop contribution, we gauge the capability of FSE and FCE to estimate effects of early career unemployment spells on recruiters’ hiring decisions. Using data obtained from a survey with sequentially implemented FSE and FCE with 2000 recruiters in Bulgaria, Greece, Norway, and Switzerland we compare FSE and FCE using multilevel linear regression models and multilevel probit models with random effects. Our preliminary results suggest that FCE may be better suited to gather valid data with minimal social desirability bias. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailUnderstanding unemployment scars: A vignette Experiment of employers' decisions in Bulgaria, Greece, Norway and Switzerland
Hyggen, Christer; Imdorf, Christian; Parsanaglou, Dimitris et al

E-print/Working paper (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailIntroduction to Analytical Strategies for Experimental Data
Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2016, September 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailUnderstanding employers’ assessment of young job applicants: A comparative vignette experiment
Imdorf, Christian; Samuel, Robin UL; Shi, Lulu P.

Scientific Conference (2016, September 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of Insecure Employment Trajectories on Employers' Hiring Decisions in Switzerland
Shi, Lulu P.; Imdorf, Christian; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in Baslé, Maurice; Beaupère, Nathalie; Guéguen, Chantal (Eds.) et al Les transitions professionnelles tout au long de la vie. Nouveaux regards, nouveaux sens, nouvelles temporalités ? (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (6 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDer Einfluss der sozialen Herkunft auf postobligatorische Bildungsverläufe in der Schweiz
Hupka-Brunner, Sandra; Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

in Scharenberg, Katja; Hupka-Brunner, Sandra; Meyer, Thomas (Eds.) et al Transitionen im Jugend- und jungen Erwachsenenalter: Ergebnisse der Schweizer Längsschnittstudie TREE (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (16 UL)
See detailThe Gendered Interplay between Success and Well-Being during Transitions
Samuel, Robin UL

in Hadjar, Andreas; Krolak, Sabine; Priem, Karin (Eds.) et al Gender and Educational Achievement (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 239 (19 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow Welfare-State Regimes Shape Subjective Well-Being Across Europe
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Social Indicators Research (2016), 129(2), 565-587

Welfare-state regimes achieve different outcomes in dealing with social inequalities. For example, the social democratic or Scandinavian welfare-state regime is often considered as the most egalitarian ... [more ▼]

Welfare-state regimes achieve different outcomes in dealing with social inequalities. For example, the social democratic or Scandinavian welfare-state regime is often considered as the most egalitarian with a high social transfer rate and a comparably low level of income inequality. While most research on welfare-state regimes focuses on objective indicators of quality of life and inequalities, we are interested in how citizens actually evaluate their lives, using subjective well-being (SWB) as an indicator. The paper deals with two research questions: (1) How does the welfare-state regime affect subjective well-being, and (2) does the welfare-state regime influence the effect of status on SWB? Status is an essential first-order goal to produce subjective well-being according to the social production theory of Lindenberg and colleagues (Ormel et al. 1999), but is also linked to many other instrumental goals such as comfort and stimulation. The study carries out a multilevel analysis using pooled European Social Survey data from the years 2002–2012, covering more than 30 European countries. While we first look at how status drives SWB levels in different welfare-state regimes as classified by Esping-Andersen 1990, 1999), our focus is mainly on cross-level interactions between welfare-state regime type and the relationship between status and SWB. Our results provide evidence that social-democratic welfare-state regimes not only provide for living standards that are associated with the highest SWB levels, but also compensate best for status differences in SWB compared to other welfare-state regimes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 255 (37 UL)
See detailIntroduction to Bayesian Approaches to Data Analysis
Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2015, November 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAdvances in understanding energy consumption behavior and the governance of its change – outline of an integrated framework
Burger, Paul; Bezençon, Valéry; Bornemann, Basil et al

in Frontiers in Energy Research (2015), 3(29),

Transforming today’s energy systems in industrialized countries requires a substantial reduction of the total energy consumption at the individual level. Selected instruments have been found to be ... [more ▼]

Transforming today’s energy systems in industrialized countries requires a substantial reduction of the total energy consumption at the individual level. Selected instruments have been found to be effective in changing people’s behavior in single domains. However, the so far weak success story on reducing overall energy consumption indicates that our understanding of the determining factors of individual energy consumption as well as of its change is far from being conclusive. Among others, the scientific state of the art is dominated by analyzing single domains of consumption and by neglecting embodied energy. It also displays strong disciplinary splits and the literature often fails to distinguish between explaining behavior and explaining change of behavior. Moreover, there are knowledge gaps regarding the legitimacy and effectiveness of the governance of individual consumption behavior and its change. Against this backdrop, the aim of this paper is to establish an integrated interdisciplinary framework that offers a systematic basis for linking the different aspects in research on energy related consumption behavior, thus paving the way for establishing a better evidence base to inform societal actions. The framework connects the three relevant analytical aspects of the topic in question: (1) it systematically and conceptually frames the objects, i.e., the energy consumption behavior and its change (explananda); (2) it structures the factors that potentially explain the energy consumption behavior and its change (explanantia); (3) it provides a differentiated understanding of change inducing interventions in terms of governance. Based on the existing states of the art approaches from different disciplines within the social sciences, the proposed framework is supposed to guide interdisciplinary empirical research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (18 UL)
See detailA che cosa aspirano i giovani adulti in Svizzera per il loro avvenire?
Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes upward social mobility increase life satisfaction? A longitudinal analysis using British and Swiss panel data
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Samuel, Robin UL

in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility (2015), 39

A main assumption of social production function theory is that status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). From the perspective of the dissociative hypothesis, however, upward social ... [more ▼]

A main assumption of social production function theory is that status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). From the perspective of the dissociative hypothesis, however, upward social mobility may be linked to identity problems, distress, and reduced levels of SWB because upwardly mobile people lose their ties to their class of origin. In this paper, we examine whether or not one of these arguments holds. We employ the United Kingdom and Switzerland as case studies because both are linked to distinct notions regarding social inequality and upward mobility. Longitudinal multilevel analyses based on panel data (UK: BHPS, Switzerland: SHP) allow us to reconstruct individual trajectories of life satisfaction (as a cognitive component of SWB) along with events of intragenerational and intergenerational upward mobility—taking into account previous levels of life satisfaction, dynamic class membership, and well-studied determinants of SWB. Our results show some evidence for effects of social class and social mobility on well-being in the UK sample, while there are no such effects in the Swiss sample. The UK findings support the idea of dissociative effects in terms of a negative effect of intergenerational upward mobility on SWB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 387 (58 UL)
See detailA quoi les jeunes adultes en Suisse aspirent pour leur avenir?
Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailStudying employers’ risk assessment and the role of institutions: An experimental design
Shi, Penghui Lulu; Imdorf, Christian; Samuel, Robin UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Work Package 7 aims at understanding how early job insecurity can affect an individual’s future career from an employer’s perspective. By paying special attention to the educational background and gender ... [more ▼]

Work Package 7 aims at understanding how early job insecurity can affect an individual’s future career from an employer’s perspective. By paying special attention to the educational background and gender of the applicants, we plan to investigate how employers interpret young applicants’ job insecurity, for example in the form of unemployment or job-mismatch experiences, during recruitment. The negative effects of such experiences on an individual’s chances of being recruited successfully – so called scarring effects – may further vary depending on economic and institutional contexts such as country-specific economic or political conditions, educational structures or economic sectors. By surveying employers from different sectors, we will examine if and how these scarring effects vary between four different countries: Bulgaria, Greece, Norway and Switzerland. We will apply an innovative methodology in the form of an employer-sided survey with an integrated multidimensional vignette experiment in order to simulate the impact of multiple factor s on success and failure when young people who experienced job insecurities apply for new jobs. In the present working paper we summarise the major theoretical concepts that have been used to explain the scarring effects that can result from employer behaviour. Moreover, we outline how we plan to collect data in WP 7 in order to analyse scarring through decision-making on behalf of employers during the recruitment process [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUpward social mobility and life satisfaction: the cases of United Kingdom and Switzerland
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (2015), 6(3), 13-14

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social ... [more ▼]

Status is a major determinant of subjective well-being (SWB). This is one of the primary assumptions of social production function theory. In contrast, the dissociative hypothesis holds that upward social mobility may be linked to identity problems, cognitive distress, and reduced levels of SWB because of lost ties to one’s class of origin. In our paper, we use panel data from the United Kingdom (British Household Panel Survey) and Switzerland (Swiss Household Panel) to test these hypotheses. These two countries are compared because historically, social inequality and upward mobility have played distinct roles in each country’s popular discourse. We conduct longitudinal multilevel analyses to gauge the effects of intragenerational and intergenerational upward mobility on life satisfaction (as a cognitive component of SWB), controlling for previous levels of life satisfaction, dynamic class membership, and well-researched determinants of SWB such as age and health problems. Our results provide some evidence for effects of social class and social mobility on well-being in the UK sample, however, there are no such effects in the Swiss sample. The UK findings support the idea of dissociative effects, that is, intergenerational upward mobility is negatively associated with SWB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 196 (9 UL)
See detailZukunftsaspirationen junger Erwachsener in der Schweiz
Samuel, Robin UL; Bergman, Manfred Max

Article for general public (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (3 UL)
See detailMale and female routes to success
Samuel, Robin UL

Article for general public (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 UL)
See detailThe Gendered Interplay between Success and Well-Being during Transitions
Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 185 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Meaning and Measurement of Well-Being as an Indicator of Success
Keller, Anita C; Semmer, Norbert K; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in Keller, Anita C; Samuel, Robin; Bergman, Manfred Max (Eds.) et al Psychological, Educational, and Sociological Perspectives on Success and Well-Being in Career Development (2014)

This chapter discusses the conceptualization and measurement of well-being and success, and the relationships between the two. Many scholars in well-being research agree that well-being consists of ... [more ▼]

This chapter discusses the conceptualization and measurement of well-being and success, and the relationships between the two. Many scholars in well-being research agree that well-being consists of satisfaction, positive and negative affect. There are less well established definitions in the area of success. Frequently, success is conceptualized in terms of career success, distinguishing between objective and subjective indicators. These indicators most often include salary, status, and career satisfaction. They are sometimes criticized for being inappropriate in current labor markets and as to their individual meaning. In this chapter, we provide a widening of the understanding of career success. This by incorporating the broader concept of work success in terms of success episodes referring to task performance, pro-social success, appreciation, and feedback [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (2 UL)