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See detailWhat is meant by inclusion: On the effects of different definitions on attitudes toward inclusion.
Krischler, Mireille UL; Powell, Justin J W UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in European Journal of Special Needs Education (2019), 34(5), 632-648

Aiming to further our knowledge about what is meant by inclusion, we examined how various conceptualisations relate to people’s attitudes about inclusive education. We assign the varying characterisations ... [more ▼]

Aiming to further our knowledge about what is meant by inclusion, we examined how various conceptualisations relate to people’s attitudes about inclusive education. We assign the varying characterisations of inclusion of specific groups with differing involvement in the education system in Luxembourg, applying the influential systematisation of definitions of inclusion by Göransson and Nilholm (2014). Results of study 1 showed that members of the general population, pre-service and in-service teachers perceive inclusive education in importantly different ways. Although results showed relatively positive attitudes toward inclusive education for the whole sample, attitudes varied by group and in relation to the differential categorisation of definitions. As teachers’ attitudes and the extent to which they feel prepared to implement inclusive practice are crucial for the success of inclusive education, the latter aspect is further investigated in study 2. Results showed that teachers with more in-depth understanding of inclusive education reported more positive attitudes and felt better prepared to implement inclusive practices. Implications for education systems and society are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSmoking, Implicit Attitudes, and Context-Sensitivity: An Overview
Glock, Sabine UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Substance Abuse and Addiction: : Breakthroughs in Research and Practice (2019)

This chapter focuses on implicit attitudes toward smoking and provides the first systematic review of research in this domain. Implicit attitudes are suggested to guide automatic behavior, thereby playing ... [more ▼]

This chapter focuses on implicit attitudes toward smoking and provides the first systematic review of research in this domain. Implicit attitudes are suggested to guide automatic behavior, thereby playing a pivotal role for automatic processes inherent in addictive behaviors. This chapter further explores the extent to which implicit attitudes are context-sensitive. More specifically, it reviews studies that have focused on the differential effects of external cues such as warning labels and internal cues (e.g., deprivation). Results of 32 studies show that although smokers generally have more positive implicit attitudes than non-smokers, the valence of implicit attitudes varies as a result of the applied method or stimuli. Studies reveal that implicit attitudes toward smoking partly depend on external cues, especially outcome expectancies. Similarly, internal cues affect implicit attitudes whereby the level of nicotine deprivation seems vital. Implications for intervention and future research are indicated in the discussion. [less ▲]

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See detailL’éducation inclusive du point de vue du personnel de l’enseignement fondamental luxembourgeois
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

in Lenz, Thomas; Baumann, Isabell; Küpper, Achim (Eds.) Rapport Ntional sur l´Éducation au Luxembourg 2018 (2018)

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See detailInklusive Bildung aus der Sicht luxemburgischer Grundschullehrerinnen und -lehrer
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

in Lenz, Thomas; Baumann, Isabell; Küpper, Achim (Eds.) Nationaler Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2018 (2018)

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See detailÜbergangsentscheidungen in Luxemburg – Die Passung zwischen Leistungs- und Anforderungsniveau und deren Relation zum späteren Lernerfolg
Hörstermann, Thomas UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

in Lenz, Thomas; Baumann, Isabell; Küpper, Achim (Eds.) Nationaler Bildungsbericht Luxemburg 2018 (2018)

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See detailTeacher expectations concerning students with immigrant background or special educational needs
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Glock, Sabine UL

in Educational Research and Evaluation (2018)

Male students with immigrant backgrounds are disproportionally referred for special educational support outside regular classrooms or schools, which may reflect differential teachers´ expectations ... [more ▼]

Male students with immigrant backgrounds are disproportionally referred for special educational support outside regular classrooms or schools, which may reflect differential teachers´ expectations concerning the academic achievement of students based on socio-demographic characteristics. Although research has indicated differential teachers´ expectations for students based on immigrant background or special educational needs (SEN), less is known about a possible double vulnerability associated with combined stereotypes. Therefore, in the current study both SEN and immigrant background were systematically varied and teachers were asked to rate the students´ academic achievement. Results show that teachers´ expectations of students with SEN and immigrant background was lower than for students without immigrant background, especially in regards to language proficiency. These results may help to explain the overrepresentation of students with immigrant background in special educational programs. The educational and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailInclusive Practice: The influence of teachers´ attitudes and competence
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Presentation (2018, November 21)

Following the global drive toward more equity in educational systems in general, and inclusive education in particular (UN, 2006), research has focused increasingly on the extent to which teachers are or ... [more ▼]

Following the global drive toward more equity in educational systems in general, and inclusive education in particular (UN, 2006), research has focused increasingly on the extent to which teachers are or can be prepared to accommodate students with diverse special educational needs (SEN) in their classrooms. Teachers play a key role in creating inclusive learning environments (Borg, Hunter, Sigurjonsdottir, & D’Alessio, 2011) and for the successful implementation of inclusive practice (Meijer, Soriano, & Watkins, 2003). However, whilst teachers are faced with increasingly heterogeneous classrooms, relatively little is known about teachers´ perceived competence and willingness to accommodate a heterogeneous student population in relation to the characteristics of the school environment and demands of the educational system. In addition, it is important to consider teachers´ attitudes toward students with SEN and related behavioural intentions that may facilitate or hinder inclusion. More specifically, decisions concerning the interaction with and educational instruction of students with SEN may be affected by teachers´ perceived competence as well as by general stereotypes and associated attitudes, as attitudes can elicit positive or negative expectations and judgments, which, in turn, can enhance or limit the inclusion of students with SEN in mainstream schools. The presentation will outline findings of the INCLUS project, funded by the Luxembourgish National research Foundation (FNR), concerning teacher variables associated with the successful implementation of inclusive practice. The project investigated teachers´ attitudes and perceived competence concerning the inclusion of children with special educational needs, and evaluated intervention modules aiming to support teachers in implementing inclusive practice. Findings and their implications will be discussed in terms of theory and their implications for teacher training programs. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers´ attitudes towards inclusion: Effects of a training module
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 17)

The success of implementing inclusive practice depends on teachers´ competence as well as their attitudes. Attitudes are defined as psychological tendencies expressed by evaluating a particular entity ... [more ▼]

The success of implementing inclusive practice depends on teachers´ competence as well as their attitudes. Attitudes are defined as psychological tendencies expressed by evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor. Research has provided mixed results concerning teachers´ attitudes toward students with SEN and inclusive practice, whereby teachers generally have more positive attitudes toward the inclusion of students with mild SEN than toward students with complex needs. Training, especially modules focusing on the cognitive processes underlying judgment, can facilitate positive change in attitudes toward inclusion of students with SEN. In a pre–post-test design, data were collected for a sample of 33 experienced primary school teachers attending a course (2x4hr) on inclusion with a focus on the role of attitudes in decision-making and behavior. We assessed general attitudes toward the inclusion of students with SEN as well as teachers´ emotional reactions, stereotypes and behavioural intentions. Results of a repeated measures ANOVA, with time (pre vs. post) and general attitude toward inclusion (4 subscales) as within group factors only showed a main effect for attitudes, reflecting variations between the subscale scores. The training course did not result in changes in general attitudes. Further analyses revealed a positive pre-post course change in teachers´ emotional reactions concerning the inclusion of a student with SEN in their class. Teachers´ stereotype ratings indicated they perceived students with learning difficulties as less competent but warm, whereas students with challenging behavior were perceived as relatively competent but average in warmth. Finally, teachers´ behavioral intentions shifted from focusing on finding solutions within the classroom to more cooperation with colleagues, parents and experts to provide the best support for the student with SEN. In sum, the training course impacted both the affective and conative components of attitudes, whereas general attitudes toward inclusion remained unchanged. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in preservice teachers´ attitudes toward inclusion: the role of competence
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 13)

Following policies to promote a more equitable and inclusive educational system, the question arises how to prepare teachers to accommodate an increasingly heterogeneous student population. As teachers´ ... [more ▼]

Following policies to promote a more equitable and inclusive educational system, the question arises how to prepare teachers to accommodate an increasingly heterogeneous student population. As teachers´ competence concerning inclusion is grounded in their training (e.g. Baker-Ericzen et al. 2009), courses focussing on inclusion as an educational practice could reduce uncertainties (e.g. Carroll et al. 2003). However, inclusion not only depends on teachers´ competence but also on their attitudes. Teachers’ attitudes may be pivotal for the success of inclusive education as they can elicit differential expectations and behaviors, which can enhance or limit the successful inclusion of students with special educational needs (SEN). Avramidis and Norwich (2002) stressed the importance of training in the formation of positive attitudes toward the integration of students with SEN. Although several studies have reported positive changes in attitudes following a course on inclusive education (e.g. Shade & Stewart, 2001), the relationship between competence and attitudes is less clear. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of a course on inclusive pedagogy on competence and attitudes and the association between these constructs. Data were collected for 69 preservice teachers enrolled in a course on inclusive pedagogy. Attitudes toward the inclusion of students with SEN were assessed before and after the course, using the German version of The Opinions Relative to Integration of Students with Disabilities questionnaire (ORI; Benoit & Bless, 2014). In addition, at the end of the course students indicated to what extend the course had helped them to gain knowledge, skills and strategies concerning teaching a heterogeneous student population. Results of a repeated measures 2×4 ANOVA, with time (pre vs. post) and attitude towards inclusion (ORI subscales) as within group factors showed a main effect for attitudes, reflecting variations between the subscale scores. A significant time × attitudes interaction effect indicated positive attitude changes over time, but only in the domain of educational and social progression of students with SEN. Results of a regression analysis indicated that, after controlling for pre-course attitude ratings, perceived competence predicted attitude ratings at the end of the course. This study shows that teacher training can positively affect both teachers´ competence and attitudes concerning inclusive education, whereby perceived competence contributed to positive attitude change. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial participation and peer relationships of students with special educational needs
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

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See detailInstilling teacher agency in professional development: an international outlook. Enabling teachers in Luxembourg to implement inclusive practice
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Sibilio, Maurizio; Aiello, Paola (Eds.) Lo sviluppo professionale dei docenti. Ragionare di agentività per una scuola inclusiva (2018, July)

Teachers’ attitudes may be pivotal for the success of inclusive education. Attitudes can elicit positive or negative expectations and judgments, which in turn can enhance or limit the successful inclusion ... [more ▼]

Teachers’ attitudes may be pivotal for the success of inclusive education. Attitudes can elicit positive or negative expectations and judgments, which in turn can enhance or limit the successful inclusion of students with special educational needs (SEN) in regular classrooms. Over the last decades, Luxembourg has invested significant effort in providing training to teachers and other professionals to improve educational services for students with SEN. The recent School Law (Summer 2017) stipulates how the inclusion of students with SEN can be facilitated. Although these changes all aim to facilitate the successful implementation of inclusive educational practice, it will be important to continue to investigate and interpret teachers’ attitudes and perceived competence and efficacy in the context of the educational system. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoting inclusive education: The role of teacher’ attitudes and competence
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Markova, Mariya UL; Krischler, Mireille UL et al

in Insights on Learning Disabilities: from prevailing theories to validated practices (2018), 15(1), 49-63

Teachers are expected to accommodate an increasingly heterogeneous student population. However, teachers often feel ill prepared and hence may be apprehensive toward the inclusion of students with special ... [more ▼]

Teachers are expected to accommodate an increasingly heterogeneous student population. However, teachers often feel ill prepared and hence may be apprehensive toward the inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) in regular classrooms. This paper concerns factors associated with the successful implementation of inclusive education. More specifically, it considers teacher characteristics that may facilitate -or hinder- the inclusion of students with SEN. The paper first discusses teacher competencies concerning the accommodation of students with SEN in regular classrooms, not only as a determinant of effective inclusive practice, but also in relation to teacher attitudes toward inclusive education. Second, we investigate to what extent teacher’ attitudes, both toward students with SEN and inclusive education, may affect teaching behaviors and (positive) action toward students with SEN. The paper further discusses (training) methods that could be applied to increase teacher competence and foster positive attitudes in an attempt to strive to a more equitable educational system. [less ▲]

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See detailInclusive education in Luxembourg: implicit and explicit attitudes toward inclusion and students with special educational needs
Krischler, Mireille UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in International Journal of Inclusive Education (2018)

The aim of the current study was to investigate attitudes of Luxemburgish adults toward students with special educational needs (SEN) and their inclusion into mainstream schools. Positive attitudes can ... [more ▼]

The aim of the current study was to investigate attitudes of Luxemburgish adults toward students with special educational needs (SEN) and their inclusion into mainstream schools. Positive attitudes can facilitate inclusion, furthering the acceptance of students with SEN. Implicit and explicit attitudes may have differential impact on behaviour toward students with SEN, however, to date, there is little research combining explicit and implicit attitudes measurement tools. Participants (N = 161) completed an evaluative priming task, the Attitudes Toward Inclusive Education in the Population questionnaire as well as the German version of the Attitudes toward Inclusive Education Scale. Results show that participants expressed positive attitudes toward inclusive education in general. Participantś implicit attitudes toward students with differing types of SEN varied, with neutral attitudes toward students with learning difficulties and negative attitudes toward students with challenging behaviour. In addition, participantś explicit attitudes toward the inclusion of students with learning difficulties or challenging behaviour in mainstream classrooms were negative. In sum, although people may support the general idea of inclusion, when asked about their attitudes toward students with specific types of SEN, and the inclusion of these students in mainstream schools, participantś attitudes were rather negative. The implications of these findings for the inclusion and acceptance of students with SEN in education and society are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers´ Attitudes toward Students with High- and Low-Educated Parents
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Glock, Sabine UL

in Social Psychology of Education (2018), 21(3), 725-742

Educational inequalities may be derived from differential teacher expectations toward students from different backgrounds. Such expectations may be associated with stereotypical beliefs and attitudes ... [more ▼]

Educational inequalities may be derived from differential teacher expectations toward students from different backgrounds. Such expectations may be associated with stereotypical beliefs and attitudes, which guide behavior and judgments. Although ample research is available concerning differential teacher attitudes based on student ethnicity, few studies have considered the effect of the educational level of the parents. The aim of the current study was to investigate teachers´ implicit and explicit attitudes toward students with differentially educated parents. Implicit attitudes were measured using an implicit association task (IAT). The first name of the student was used as a proxy for the educational level of parents, whereby we created separate versions for boys and girls. Participants were randomly divided in two groups whereby the first group completed the IAT-boys version and the other group the IAT-girls version. Explicit attitudes were measured using a questionnaire. Participants indicated positive implicit attitudes toward students with highly educated parents, independent of the gender of the student. Teachers did not express differential explicit beliefs regarding the learning and social behaviors of students based on the educational level of the parents, and their expectations concerning the motivation and ambitions or educational chances of these students were neutral. The dissociation between implicit and explicit attitudes may be an indication of the social sensitivity of the relationship between students´ social background and educational achievements and opportunities. Especially implicit attitudes may account for differences in teacher behaviors toward different groups of students and in turn their educational opportunities, and could therefore partly account for consistent findings of educational inequalities based on the social status of families. [less ▲]

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