References of "Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke 50008840"
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See detailEmpathy in Preschool Children: The development of the Southampton Test of Empathy for Preschoolers (STEP)
Howe, A.; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Brown, A. et al

in Psychological Assessment (2008), 20(3), 305-309

In this study, we investigated a new instrument: the Southampton Test of Empathy for Preschoolers (STEP). The test incorporated 8 video vignettes of children in emotional scenarios, assessing a child's ... [more ▼]

In this study, we investigated a new instrument: the Southampton Test of Empathy for Preschoolers (STEP). The test incorporated 8 video vignettes of children in emotional scenarios, assessing a child's ability to understand (STEP-UND) and share (STEP-SHA) in the emotional experience of a story protagonist. Each vignette included 4 emotions (angry, happy, fearful, sad) that reflected emotion judgments based on the protagonist's facial expression, situation, verbal cues, and desire. The STEP was administered to 39 preschool children, and internal reliability, concurrent validity, and construct validity were addressed. The results showed good internal consistency. They also highlighted moderate concurrent validity with parent-rated empathy, a measure of facial indices, and construct validity with teacher-rated prosocial behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailGrandparent support for mothers of children with and without physical disabilities
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Hastings, Richard P.; Johnson, Hannah et al

in Families in Society (2007), 88(1), 141-146

Grandparents' support to families of children with disabilities is generally associated with improved parental well-being. Little research addresses the question of quantitative differences in grandparent ... [more ▼]

Grandparents' support to families of children with disabilities is generally associated with improved parental well-being. Little research addresses the question of quantitative differences in grandparent support to families of children with and without disabilities. This article examines such differences. Data was collected on 50 mothers of children with spina bifida and 43 mothers of children without disabilities and results showed how mothers rated perceived maternal and paternal grandparent support. No differences were found between mothers of children with and without disabilities. These results confirm previous findings that grandparent support appears to be no more frequent in families of children with disabilities than in other families. These findings are discussed with reference to sampling limitations and implications for further research. [less ▲]

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See detailSpina bifida
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

in Ayers, S.; Baum, A.; McManus, C. (Eds.) et al Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health, & Medicine (2007)

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See detailPsychosocial adjustment to physical disability /chronic illness
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Presentation (2006, June 13)

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See detailPhysiological correlates of intellectual deficit in children with Sickle Cell Disease: Hypoxaemia, hyperaemia and brain infarction
Hogan, Alexandra M.; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh et al

in Developmental Science (2006), 9(4), 379-387

Lowered intelligence relative to controls is evident by mid-childhood in children with sickle cell disease. There is consensus that brain infarct contributes to this deficit, but the subtle lowering of IQ ... [more ▼]

Lowered intelligence relative to controls is evident by mid-childhood in children with sickle cell disease. There is consensus that brain infarct contributes to this deficit, but the subtle lowering of IQ in children with normal MRI scans might be accounted for by chronic systemic complications leading to insufficient oxygen delivery to the brain. We investigated the relationship between daytime oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)), cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and intellectual function (IQ) using path-analysis in 30 adolescents with sickle cell disease (mean age 17.4 years, SD 4.2). Initial analyses revealed that the association between SpO(2) and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) was fully mediated by increased CBFV, whereby SpO(2) was negatively correlated with CBFV and CBFV was negatively correlated with FSIQ, i.e. decreases in oxygen saturation are associated with increases in velocity, and increased velocity is associated with lowered IQ scores. The mediated relationship suggests that lowered IQ may be a function of abnormal oxygen delivery to the brain. Further analyses showed that the association between CBFV and IQ was significant for verbal but not for performance IQ. The pathophysiology characteristic of SCD can interfere with brain function and constrain intellectual development, even in the absence of an infarct. This supports the hypothesis that lowered intellectual function is partly explained by chronic hypoxia, and has wider implications for our understanding of SCD pathophysiology. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of health related quality of life in individuals with neural tube defects
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Wyszynski, D. F. (Ed.) Neural Tube defects: From origin to treatment (2006)

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See detailPerceived positive gain and its effect on the illness-parenting stress relationship
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, J

Poster (2004, April)

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See detailFamily adjustment to disability and chronic illnessin children
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Doctoral thesis (2004)

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See detailThe nature of hyperactivity in children and adolescents with hydrocephalus: a test of the dual pathway mode
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in Neural Plasticity (2004), 11(1-2), 13-21

To determine the strength and nature of the association between hydrocephalus and hyperactivity and to test the dual pathway model (DPM) of AD/HD, we compared a group of 51 children and adolescents with ... [more ▼]

To determine the strength and nature of the association between hydrocephalus and hyperactivity and to test the dual pathway model (DPM) of AD/HD, we compared a group of 51 children and adolescents with hydrocephalus with 57 normally developing controls from the general population on a battery of neuropsychological assessments. The mean hyperactivity scores were significantly greater in the group with hydrocephalus (effect size = 0.94). This association was not just part of a general elevated rate of behavior problems and was not affected by sex or age. Variation in the clinical features of hydrocephalus was not related to the severity of hyperactivity. Path analysis was used to examine the relation between IQ, delay aversion, and executive function. In accordance with the DPM, the effect of hydrocephalus on hyperactivity was completely mediated via delay aversion and executive functions. [less ▲]

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See detailZelfbeeld en gedrag van kinderen met spina bifida en hydrocephalus in Nederland
de Wit, O; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, J

Report (2003)

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See detailThe nature of hyperactivity in children with hydrocephalus
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2002, October)

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See detailPeer relations and neuropsychological abilities in children with hydrocephalus and/or spina bifida
Stevenson, Jim; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2002, October)

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See detailBehaviour problems and expressed emotion in children with spina bifida and/or hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2002, September)

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See detailDisability and quality of life in spina bifida and hydrocephalus
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Kennedy, Collin; Stevenson, Jim

in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement (2002), 44(5), 317-322

This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of severity and type of condition and family resources on quality of life in children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus. A national UK sample of children aged between 6 and 13 years with spina bifida (n=62), hydrocephalus (n=354), and spina bifida plus hydrocephalus (n=128) were identified via the register of the Association for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (ASBAH). Parents completed standardized measures of Child Health Related Quality Of Life (CQOL), family needs survey (FNS), and caregiving self-efficacy scale (CSES) as well as questions on children's health and physical ability. Results showed there were no significant differences in the overall quality of life for the three disability conditions. The overall CQOL was over 1 SD lower for those with spina bifida and hydrocephalus than for children with other physical conditions. Sex and age were not related to overall CQOL. Specific aspects of CQOL differentiated the three groups. Children with spina. bifida had poorer CQOL scores on self-care, continence, and mobility/activities whilst those with hydrocephalus had poorer scores on school activities, worries, sight, and communication. Severity of condition and family resources, i.e. CSES and FNS, predicted 32% of the variance in CQOL. Associations were also found between overall CQOL and problems discernible at birth as well as epilepsy. Other factors, including those related to shunts, were not significantly related to CQOL. It was concluded that hydrocephalus is just as great a threat to CQOL as spina bifida. Beyond the general effect of condition severity on CQOL, family resources (as measured by the CSES and FNS) represent an additional influence on CQOL. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relationship between body image and psychosocial adjustment in adolescents with spina bifida
Fulcher, A.B:; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Poster (2001, September)

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See detailWhen Chronic Disability Meets Acute Stress: Psychological and Functional Changes
Miller, A. Cate; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Johann-Murphy, Marjorie

in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology. Supplement (2001), 43(3), 214-216

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