References of "Pinto Costa, Andreia 50002862"
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See detailThe contribution of emotion dysregulation to depressive symptomatology in parents of children with ASD.
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2016)

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) usually present more disruptive and aggressive behaviors than typically developing (TD) children (Farmer & Aman, 2011). These difficult behaviors from the ... [more ▼]

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) usually present more disruptive and aggressive behaviors than typically developing (TD) children (Farmer & Aman, 2011). These difficult behaviors from the child can put parents of these children at a greater risk of increased mental health problems than parents of TD children (Totsika et al., 2011). The use of specific emotion regulation strategies can be a strong protective factor against adverse life events (Troy & Mauss, 2011). Additionally, how parents perceive their children’s emotional difficulties is related to their own well-being (Davis & Carter, 2008). The current study analyses how parents’ emotion dysregulation (e.g. lack of adaptive regulatory strategies) and parents’ perceptions of their children’s emotion dysregulation (e.g. negative reactivity, easily frustrated, presence of disruptive behaviors) contribute to parents’ depressive symptomatology. 37 parents of children with ASD and 41 parents of TD children completed questionnaires regarding their depressive symptomatology, their emotion dysregulation, and their perception of their children’s emotion dysregulation. Parents of children with ASD, compared to parents of TD children, reported more depressive symptomatology and more emotion dysregulation in themselves and in their children. Regression analyses revealed that parents’ own emotion dysregulation and their perception of their children’s emotion dysregulation contributed to their depressive symptomatology above and beyond ASD diagnosis. Furthermore, mediation analysis revealed that parents’ emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between ASD diagnosis and parents’ depressive symptomatology. These results may have implications for the prevention and development of interventions on the well-being and mental health of parents of children with ASD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 UL)
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See detailCoping with cyberbullying in adolescent population
Steffgen, Georges UL; Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Slee, Phillip

Scientific Conference (2015, May 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (3 UL)
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See detailCoping with Bullying questionnaire: Validation of the German adaptation
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL; Skrzypiec, Grace

Poster (2015, May 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (6 UL)
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See detailContributors to undergraduates' perception of skill acquisition across time
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Journal of Education and Training Studies (2015), 3(5), 26-34

The present study examined the relation between the amount of years of study and the perception of skill acquisition through indicators of students’ satisfaction with the course program. It was ... [more ▼]

The present study examined the relation between the amount of years of study and the perception of skill acquisition through indicators of students’ satisfaction with the course program. It was hypothesized that the more years students spend at the university, the higher their perception of skill acquisition and that factors related to the course program moderate this relationship. Participants were 314 undergraduate students in psychology who completed the Bachelor Evaluation Questionnaire, which assessed the perceived quality of the course program. Factor analysis revealed that the questionnaire assessed five different factors: Teachers and teaching, Course climate, Learning promotion, Course requirements, and Skill acquisition. A sub-sample of 117 students, who evaluated the course on their first and again on their fifth semester, was used to examine the change on perception of skill acquisition and the influence of course related factors on that change. It was found that students’ perception of skill acquisition increased from first to fifth semester and that this increase was moderated by students’ perception of learning promotion. Those with early low perception of learning promotion were at greater disadvantage of increasing perceived skill acquisition during their studies. Those with early high learning promotion but with early low perception of skill acquisition at the beginning, reached similar levels of perceived skill acquisition by the end of their studies as those with early high perception of skill acquisition. The implications of these findings for theory and practice in relation to academic achievement are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 134 (12 UL)
See detailEmotion Regulation and Anger Expression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2014, November)

Emotion regulation (ER) is an important aspect of children’s emotional and social development. It maximizes learning and allows the development of trusting relationships. ER is particularly relevant for ... [more ▼]

Emotion regulation (ER) is an important aspect of children’s emotional and social development. It maximizes learning and allows the development of trusting relationships. ER is particularly relevant for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Children with ASD have frequent behavioural disturbances that are believed to derive from low ER capacities. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between ER and anger expression in children with ASD compared to typically developing (TD) children. Participants were 29 children aged from 5 to 12 years old. 8 children were diagnosed with ASD accompanied by intellectual and language impairments, 9 children were diagnosed with ASD without intellectual or language impairments, and 12 were TD children. ER was assessed by parents’ reports of their child’s ER and anger expression by the observation of children during a frustration-eliciting situation. Analyses of variance revealed that children with ASD were evaluated by their parents as having lower ER than TD children and, that children with ASD demonstrated more anger-related behaviours than TD children. However, no differences were found between the two groups of children with ASD for ER or anger expression. This shows that intellectual or language impairments in ASD are not key-factors on how parents perceive their children’s ER or on how they express anger. Moreover, a negative correlation was found between ER and expressed anger. These results stress the necessity of developing interventions for teaching adequate ER strategies to children with ASD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (5 UL)
See detailFrustration and anger regulation in children with autism spectrum disorder
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2014, July)

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication and difficulties regulating emotions. Emotion regulation is an important aspect of children’s emotional ... [more ▼]

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by impairments in social interaction, communication and difficulties regulating emotions. Emotion regulation is an important aspect of children’s emotional and social development. It maximizes learning and allows the development of trusting relationships. In the present study we aimed at studying how children with ASD regulate frustration and anger. Participants were 17 children diagnosed with ASD aged between 5 and 12 years old (14 boys and 3 girls) and their parents. Emotion regulation was assessed by parents’ reports of their child’s emotion regulation (Emotion Regulation Checklist, Shields & Cicchetti, 1998) and through the observation of children during the episode “Attractive toy placed behind a barrier”. The purpose of this episode was to elicit frustration and anger by placing a toy, with which the child had been playing, behind a barrier. Anger was coded as verbal and physical action against the barrier or persons present. Results revealed that children with more autistic symptoms were evaluated by their parents as having more difficulties regulating their emotions. Furthermore, parents’ evaluations of their child’s emotion regulation were positively correlated to the expression of anger during the frustration and anger regulation episode. However, no significant differences were observed in terms of autistic symptoms during the frustration and anger regulation episode. In conclusion, results show that children with more autistic symptoms are seen by their parents as having more difficulties regulating their emotions but do not show differences in terms of their emotion regulation during a frustration and anger eliciting episode. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 262 (5 UL)
See detailEffects of Autistic Traits on Emotion Regulation in Neurotypical Adults
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2014, May)

Background: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence (Samson, Huber, & Gross, 2012). It has been reported that ASD is a continuum of social ... [more ▼]

Background: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence (Samson, Huber, & Gross, 2012). It has been reported that ASD is a continuum of social-communication disability (Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Skinner, Martin, & Clubley, 2001) and that neurotypical individuals are also part of that continuum and have autistic traits. Therefore, neurotypical individuals with more autistic traits would be expected to have lower emotion regulation competence than those with less autistic traits. Additionally, low levels of resting heart rate variability (HRV) have been associated with poor social functioning and emotional rigidity (Butler, Wilhelm, & Gross, 2006), which characterize ASD. Consequently, it is hypothesized that neurotypical individuals with more autistic traits should also have lower resting HRV. Objectives: To analyse if neurotypical adults with more autistic traits use less efficient emotion regulation strategies and the relation to cardiac vagal control. Methods: 80 undergraduate students participated in the study. None of the participants had a diagnosis of ASD. Participants were requested to answer four questionnaires: the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ; Baron-Cohen et al., 2001), which comprises 50 items and assesses 5 autistic traits in the general population; the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz & Roemer, 2004), which comprises 36 items and assesses 6 factors of emotional dysregulation; the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross & John, 2003), which comprises 10 items and assesses 2 emotion regulation strategies, cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression; and finally, the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20; Bagby, Parker, & Taylor, 1994), which comprises 20 items and assesses 3 factors of alexithymia. In the end, participants’ HRV was measured for 5 minutes. Results: Data collection is still being carried out and therefore definite results cannot be drawn. However, preliminary results seem to indicate that participants who have more autistic traits have in general more difficulties regulating their emotions. They use more often suppression than reappraisal as emotion regulation strategy and demonstrate more difficulties in two factors of the DERS (“Lack of emotional awareness” and “Lack of emotional clarity”). Results also seem to indicate that those with more autistic traits have a higher score in alexithymia. Concerning HRV, preliminary results indicate that those with more autistic traits have higher resting HRV. Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that, neurotypical individuals who have more autistic traits have a less adaptive emotion regulation profile compared to neurotypical individuals with less autistic traits. They use more frequently expressive suppression and less frequently cognitive reappraisal and have more difficulties understanding and being aware of their emotions. This could be explained by the fact that, similarly to individuals with ASD, neurotypical individuals with more autistic traits have more difficulties taking another person mental perspective. This is also supported by findings that those with more autistic traits have a higher score in alexithymia, showing that they have more difficulties identifying and describing emotions. The unexpected HRV result might be explained by differences in the pattern of physiological responding (Zahn, Rumsey, & Kammen, 1987). [less ▲]

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See detailEmotion regulation in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A review
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2013, October)

Introduction: Emotion regulation is an important aspect of children emotional and social development. Especially, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) seem to be at a disadvantage regarding ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Emotion regulation is an important aspect of children emotional and social development. Especially, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) seem to be at a disadvantage regarding emotion regulation due to social interaction difficulties. In the present study we review the research findings on the specific emotion regulation strategies in children with ASD. Participants and Methods: We carried out literature searches using Primo Central ExLibris for all articles published on emotion regulation in children with ASD since 2003. Articles were included if they met the following criteria: a) comprised participants with ASD under the age of 18 years; b) contained empirical research findings on emotion regulation; and c) used a prospective group comparison design. At the end, the review includes 12 independent studies. Results: In general, findings indicate that children with ASD use less emotion regulation strategies than typically developing peers. However, some studies prove less efficient strategies in children with ASD, while others did not find differences. In studies analysing the impact of interventions, children show diminished expression of negativity and more appropriate emotion regulation during post-treatment. Conclusion: Emotion regulation difficulties are a serious concern for children with ASD, yet empirical studies on this topic are still scarce. More studies with larger samples are needed. Especially, other characteristics, such as social interaction and caregiver’s intervention, that might influence emotion regulation have to be further analysed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 211 (15 UL)
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See detailAutistic traits and emotion regulation
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2013, September)

Introduction: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence than typically developing individuals; they use more frequently suppression than reappraisal ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence than typically developing individuals; they use more frequently suppression than reappraisal (Samson, Huber, & Gross, 2012). Additionally, low levels of resting heart rate variability (HRV) have been associated with poor social functioning and emotional rigidity (Butler, Wilhelm, & Gross, 2006), which characterize individuals with ASD. Therefore, it is hypothesized that typically developing individuals with more autistic traits use more frequently suppression instead of reappraisal and have lower resting HRV. Methodology: 66 students (age: M=21.73, SD=2.49) participated in the study. Firstly, participants resting HRV was measured for 5 minutes. Afterwards, participants watched 5 videos of one minute long each (Gross & Levenson, 1995). Two videos were used to elicit disgust and three were neutral. After each video, participants completed a questionnaire about the emotions felt during the video (Ekman, Friesen, & Ancoli, 1980; adapted by Gross & Levenson, 1993). Finally, participants completed the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ; Baron-Cohen et al., 2001), and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross & John, 2003). Results: Participants who used more frequently suppression had more autistic traits (M=20.13, SD=4.73) than those who used more frequently reappraisal (M=15.06, SD=4.50; t(64)=3.80, p<.001). Furthermore, the more autistic traits participants had, the more they rated their emotions during the disgust-eliciting videos as pleasant (r(57)=.295, p<.05), and the more they reported feeling positive emotions (r(63)=.262, p<.05). However, no correlation was found regarding negative emotions. Concerning resting HRV participants with more autistic traits had higher HRV (r(47)=.29, p<.05). Conclusions: Similarly to individuals with ASD, typically developing individuals with more autistic traits used more frequently suppression, demonstrating less emotion regulation competence. The reported higher rates of pleasantness during the disgust-eliciting videos and the overall experience of more positive emotions can be interpreted as a lack of cognitive empathy (Baron-Cohen & Wheelwright, 2004). The unexpected resting HRV result might be explained by differences in the pattern of physiological responding (Zahn, Rumsey, & Kammen, 1987). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 231 (22 UL)