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See detailPan-Africanism and development in the twenty-first century: A critical analysis of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development
Boshoff, Elsabé; Owiso, Owiso UL

in Addaney, Michael; Nyarko, Michael Gyan (Eds.) Ghana @ 60: Governance and human rights in twenty-first century Africa (2017)

In this chapter, we explore the Pan-African influence in the design and implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) framework with the aim of highlighting the place of Pan ... [more ▼]

In this chapter, we explore the Pan-African influence in the design and implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) framework with the aim of highlighting the place of Pan-Africanism in twenty-first century regional cooperation and development of Africa. The chapter highlights the strong influence of the Pan-African ideals and thoughts of independent Africa’s founding leaders such as Kwame Nkrumah, Sédar Senghor, Sékou Touré and Kambarage Nyerere in the NEPAD framework. The chapter argues that these ideals are as sound today as they were when they were first articulated. However, it identifies teething challenges in the framework’s implementation such as the misapplication or misconstruction of the Pan-African ideals underpinning NEPAD. As a way forward, the chapter suggests practical ways of objectively auditing NEPAD’s performance by revisiting and recommitting to its Pan-African founding principles. With revitalised Pan-Africanism, the chapter argues that the NEPAD framework can facilitate the rediscovery of the shared aspirations of African peoples to actively participate in the common development and prosperity of Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailIntractable conflicts in Africa: The international response to the Darfur and South Sudan crises
Owiso, Owiso UL; Boshoff, Elsabé; Mamhare, Tapiwa et al

in Global Campus Human Rights Journal (2017), 1(2), 287-314

This article considers the intractable conflicts and human rightssituations in Darfur, Sudan and South Sudan, respectively, against theinternational responses they elicited. Intractable conflicts are ... [more ▼]

This article considers the intractable conflicts and human rightssituations in Darfur, Sudan and South Sudan, respectively, against theinternational responses they elicited. Intractable conflicts are conflicts that havelasted for a long time with resistance to settlement despite various attempts atintervention and conciliation. These conflicts from neighbouring nations haveboth elicited extensive engagement from the international and regionalcommunities but, while some clarity regarding the direction to be taken has beenachieved in the case of South Sudan, the situation in Darfur remains dire. Thearticle analyses the difference in the peace-building approaches in the twoconflicts and how these approaches have contributed to the different outcomes inDarfur and South Sudan. Following an exposition of intractability in theintroduction, the second section applies the factors identified to the case ofDarfur, confirming that this indeed is an intractable situation. It then considersthe international response to the conflict in Darfur and the mechanismsemployed by the global and the regional community in an attempt to addressthis conflict. The third section considers the situation in South Sudan and theinternational response, noting that efforts were led by the regional and sub-regional bodies, with the UN’s role being to complement these efforts. Themethodology employed is a comparative analysis, in which the internationaland regional legal and institutional responses to the crisis in South Sudan areanalysed with a view to identifying the lessons to be applied in addressing thesituation in Darfur, utilising theoretical and functional approaches to legal andpolitical interventions. The final section draws from the insights gained incomparing the international response in Darfur and South Sudan, and concludesby attempting to extract general principles about intractability and theeffectiveness of international responses to situations considered to be intractable,noting in particular the importance of regional and sub-regional bodies takingthe lead in efforts to resolve intractable conflicts. [less ▲]

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See detailArbitrary home demolitions in Zimbabwe and the right to adequate shelter: Case study of Arlington estate, Harare
Owiso, Owiso UL

in ESR Review (2016), 17(3), 7-11

Zimbabwe’s human rights obligations under international and domestic laws secure the rights to property, adequate shelter, freedom from arbitrary evictions, protection and benefit of the law, fair ... [more ▼]

Zimbabwe’s human rights obligations under international and domestic laws secure the rights to property, adequate shelter, freedom from arbitrary evictions, protection and benefit of the law, fair administrative action and due process. Despite these protections, however, the government has repeatedly and arbitrarily demolished homes in urban areas particularly in Harare in apparent disregard of these rights. This article presents the findings of a field study conducted in Harare in April 2016 following the demolition of over 100 homes in Harare’s Arlington suburb in January 2016. The methodology included a site visit of demolished homes and interviews with victims of the demolitions, the victims’ lawyers, members of civil society, journalists, officials of residents’ associations and the national human rights institution in Harare between 11 April - 15 April 2016. This primary data was complemented with a desk review of available literature. The study uses the Arlington evictions as a representative case study of what has emerged over the last few years as a pattern. The article therefore examines home demolitions and evictions in Harare with particular focus on the Arlington demolitions vis-a-vis Zimbabwe’s legal obligations under both domestic and international law. The findings reveal ambiguities in Zimbabwe’s domestic legal framework; an unregulated land allocation system; political indiscipline; and government bureaucracy and departmental infighting as some factors that have created room for the widespread arbitrary demolitions and related violations of human rights. The article concludes by making targeted recommendations. [less ▲]

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