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See detailThe Construal of National Identities within the Luxembourg Context
Murdock, Elke UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2012, July 19)

We live in an increasingly mobile world. In line with the conference’s motto of “Nurturing Diversity for Sustainable Development” the current paper aims to make a contribution to the understanding of ... [more ▼]

We live in an increasingly mobile world. In line with the conference’s motto of “Nurturing Diversity for Sustainable Development” the current paper aims to make a contribution to the understanding of individual national identity construal processes within a multi-national environment. Understanding these processes may facilitate the fostering of the acceptance of culturally heterogeneous identities. Starting point for this on-going, empirical study is Luxembourg, a country with approx. ½ m inhabitants, a foreign population of 43% (increasing to over 60% in the capital) and three officially recognized languages which are spoken throughout the country. Luxembourg can be viewed as a “natural laboratory.” Given its size, population mix and closeness of borders there is ample opportunity for “second culture exposure.” How is national identity construed within such a diverse context? Is second culture exposure experienced as an enrichment or a threat? Three groups, recruited on power analytical considerations and differentiated by their length of stay in Luxembourg (native residents, Luxembourgers with migrant background and sojourners) are analyzed regarding their national identity construal process along the primordialist – situationalist spectrum. Identity Structure Analysis (ISA) is used as theoretical framework and methodological tool. Given the multi-national context, it is assumed that situationalists will be in the majority across all three groups. However, given the developmental primacy of primordialism, some persistence of the primordial orientation is expected. Bicultural orientation is also assessed. Within this context, three questions are examined: Firstly, do individuals consider it possible to have more than one national identity? Secondly, if this is the case, are these national identities kept separate or integrated (cultural distance) and thirdly is this experienced harmoniously or as a source of conflict. Research on biculturalism and ISA are linked in the assumption that those individuals who gravitate towards situationalism will also consider it possible to have a bicultural identity. In a third step, the role of dispositional factors (Big FIVE personality variables) and demographic/ biographic variables will be examined as it is anticipated that these influence how bicultural identity is expressed (separated vs. integrated) and experienced (conflicted vs. harmonious). The study explores to what extent dispositional and demographic factors determine how second culture is experienced – whether diversity is experienced as a source of enrichment and joy or threat. [less ▲]

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See detailNational identity construal and civic values
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2012, April 17)

By their very nature, civic values cannot be declared property of a single nation. In an increasingly mobile world, adherence to and high regard for democratic principles should also foster the acceptance ... [more ▼]

By their very nature, civic values cannot be declared property of a single nation. In an increasingly mobile world, adherence to and high regard for democratic principles should also foster the acceptance of culturally heterogeneous identities. The current paper aims to make a contribution to understanding the individual national identity construal processes which facilitate such openness. Luxembourg with a foreign population of over 43% (and in some parts much higher), can be viewed as a “natural laboratory” for a multinational environment. In the present study, different resident groups, differentiated by their length of stay in Luxembourg, are analysed regarding their construal of national identity along the primordialist – situationalist spectrum, their bicultural identity orientation, demographic and dispositional factors. Key questions are whether national identity is a core concept of identity for individuals in a multinational society and for whom and why. What does national identity actually mean for an individual? Identity Structure Analysis provides the theoretical framework and the methodological application IPSEUS is used as a tool for analysis. The assumption is that those individuals who endorse situationalism and consider it possible to have a bicultural orientation will also accept cultural heterogeneous identities – a key component of civic values. [less ▲]

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See detailNational Identity: Integrity and Diversity in Contemporary Europe. The Construal of National Identities within the Luxembourg Context.
Murdock, Elke UL

in Ethnicity Ethnic Minorities and Migrants (2012), 2(7), 70-85

We live in an increasingly mobile world. Luxembourg with a foreign population of 43% (over 65% in the capital) and three officially recognized languages, spoken throughout the country, can be viewed as a ... [more ▼]

We live in an increasingly mobile world. Luxembourg with a foreign population of 43% (over 65% in the capital) and three officially recognized languages, spoken throughout the country, can be viewed as a “natural laboratory.” Luxembourg has experienced a vicisstudinous history. Within a short period of time, Luxembourg has changed from being a country of emigration of becoming a target country for immigration. Initially, the iron and steel works attracted foreign populations. Today, Luxembourg is a major financial centre and host to many European institutions. The size of the country, population mix and closeness of the borders also imply that second culture exposure cannot be avoided. How is national identity construed within this context? In this paper the conceptual framework for a planned empirical study will be presented: Three different resident groups which are differentiated by their length of stay in Luxembourg (native Luxembourgers, Luxembourgers with migration background and Expatriates) will be analysed regarding their construal of national identity along the primordialist – situationalist spectrum. Furthermore, biculturalism will be explored, the hypothesis being that the position on the primordialist – situationalist spectrum will influence the bicultural orientation and the perception of second culture exposure as enrichment or threat. Identity Structure Analysis is used as a theoretical framework. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroductory Psychology Texts and the Inclusion of Culture
Lonner, Walter J.; Murdock, Elke UL

in Online Readings in Psychology and Culture (2012), Unit 11(1), 1-17

This subunit and its future extensions are intended for use in courses of study that focus, either partially or completely, on psychology and culture. The content of these contributions are expected to be ... [more ▼]

This subunit and its future extensions are intended for use in courses of study that focus, either partially or completely, on psychology and culture. The content of these contributions are expected to be helpful to both teachers and students because they address the nature and scope of the inclusion of culture in basic psychology instruction – especially as it pertains to the coverage of culture in the ubiquitous (at least in the Western world) introductory psychology texts (IPTs). In this paper we present data that document the extent to which authors of IPTs have dealt with culture over a 20-year period from 1988 to 2008. [less ▲]

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See detailEntering Our Fifth Decade: An Analysis of the Influence of the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology During Its First Forty Years of Publication
Lonner, Walter J.; Smith, Peter B.; van de Vijver, Fons et al

in Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology (2010), 41(3), 301-317

The role of the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology (JCCP) over the past 40 years in enhancing attention to cultural issues within psychology is discussed. Analyses are presented showing frequencies over ... [more ▼]

The role of the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology (JCCP) over the past 40 years in enhancing attention to cultural issues within psychology is discussed. Analyses are presented showing frequencies over the past decade with which JCCP authors cite other journals and frequencies with which authors in other journals cite JCCP authors. JCCP’s impact factor over four decades is compared with other relevant journals. Increased coverage in recent years of cultural issues in introductory psychology texts is documented. The journal has been successful as one of the leading outlets for cross-cultural studies and has achieved substantial influence, as measured by citations in relevant literature, in establishing the role culture plays in a broad variety of psychological issues and perspectives. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (3 UL)