References of "May, Patrick 50002348"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features
Niturad, Elena Christina; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2017), 140(11), 2879-2894

Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased ... [more ▼]

Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical syndromes with various degrees of severity arise from a single gene, a single mutation, or from different mutations showing similar functional defects. Accordingly, several genes coding for GABAA receptor subunits have been linked to a spectrum of benign to severe epileptic disorders and it was shown that a loss of function presents the major correlated pathomechanism. Here, we identified six variants in GABRA3 encoding the α3-subunit of the GABAA receptor. This gene is located on chromosome Xq28 and has not been previously associated with human disease. Five missense variants and one microduplication were detected in four families and two sporadic cases presenting with a range of epileptic seizure types, a varying degree of intellectual disability and developmental delay, sometimes with dysmorphic features or nystagmus. The variants co-segregated mostly but not completely with the phenotype in the families, indicating in some cases incomplete penetrance, involvement of other genes, or presence of phenocopies. Overall, males were more severely affected and there were three asymptomatic female mutation carriers compared to only one male without a clinical phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation studies could not explain the phenotypic variability in females. Three detected missense variants are localized in the extracellular GABA-binding NH2-terminus, one in the M2-M3 linker and one in the M4 transmembrane segment of the α3-subunit. Functional studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a variable but significant reduction of GABA-evoked anion currents for all mutants compared to wild-type receptors. The degree of current reduction correlated partially with the phenotype. The microduplication disrupted GABRA3 expression in fibroblasts of the affected patient. In summary, our results reveal that rare loss-of-function variants in GABRA3 increase the risk for a varying combination of epilepsy, intellectual disability/developmental delay and dysmorphic features, presenting in some pedigrees with an X-linked inheritance pattern. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVariant-DB: A Tool for Efficiently Exploring Millions of Human Genetic Variants and Their Annotations
Kutzera, Joachim UL; May, Patrick UL

in Da Silveira, Marcos; Pruski, Cédric; Schneider, Reinhard (Eds.) DILS 2017: Data Integration in the Life Sciences (2017, October 24)

Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) allows sequencing of a human genome within hours, enabling large scale applications such as sequencing the genome of each patient in a clinical study. Each individual ... [more ▼]

Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) allows sequencing of a human genome within hours, enabling large scale applications such as sequencing the genome of each patient in a clinical study. Each individual human genome has about 3.5 Million genetic differences to the so called reference genome, the consensus genome of a healthy human. These differences, called variants, determine individual phenotypes, and certain variants are known to indicate disease predispositions. Finding associations from variant patterns and affected genes to these diseases requires combined analysis of variants from multiple individuals and hence, efficient solutions for accessing and filtering the variant data. We present Variant-DB, our in-house database solution that allows such efficient access to millions of variants from hundreds to thousands of individuals. Variant-DB stores individual variant genotypes and annotations. It features a REST-API and a web-based front-end for filtering variants based on annotations, individuals, families and studies. We explain Variant-DB and its front-end and demonstrate how the Variant-DB API can be included in data integration workflows. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 173 (27 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlterations in the α2δ ligand, thrombospondin-1, in a rat model of spontaneous absence epilepsy and in patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies
Santolini, Ines; Celli, Roberta; Cannella, Milena et al

in Epilepsia (2017)

OBJECTIVES: Thrombospondins, which are known to interact with the α2 δ subunit of voltage-sensitive calcium channels to stimulate the formation of excitatory synapses, have recently been implicated in the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Thrombospondins, which are known to interact with the α2 δ subunit of voltage-sensitive calcium channels to stimulate the formation of excitatory synapses, have recently been implicated in the process of epileptogenesis. No studies have been so far performed on thrombospondins in models of absence epilepsy. We examined whether expression of the gene encoding for thrombospondin-1 was altered in the brain of WAG/Rij rats, which model absence epilepsy in humans. In addition, we examined the frequency of genetic variants of THBS1 in a large cohort of children affected by idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies (IGE/GGEs). METHODS: We measured the transcripts of thrombospondin-1 and α2 δ subunit, and protein levels of α2 δ, Rab3A, and the vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1, in the somatosensory cortex and ventrobasal thalamus of presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and in two control strains by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunoblotting. We examined the genetic variants of THBS1 and CACNA2D1 in two independent cohorts of patients affected by IGE/GGE recruited through the Genetic Commission of the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE) and the EuroEPINOMICS-CoGIE Consortium. RESULTS: Thrombospondin-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were largely reduced in the ventrobasal thalamus of both presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats, whereas levels in the somatosensory cortex were unchanged. VGLUT1 protein levels were also reduced in the ventrobasal thalamus of WAG/Rij rats. Genetic variants of THBS1 were significantly more frequent in patients affected by IGE/GGE than in nonepileptic controls, whereas the frequency of CACNA2D1 was unchanged. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that thrombospondin-1 may have a role in the pathogenesis of IGE/GGEs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMetformin reverses TRAP1 mutation-associated alterations in mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease
Fitzgerald, Julia C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Carvajal-Berrio, Daniel A. et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2017), 140(9), 2444-2459

The mitochondrial proteins TRAP1 and HtrA2 have previously been shown to be phosphorylated in the presence of the Parkinson’s disease kinase PINK1 but the downstream signaling is unclear. HtrA2 and PINK1 ... [more ▼]

The mitochondrial proteins TRAP1 and HtrA2 have previously been shown to be phosphorylated in the presence of the Parkinson’s disease kinase PINK1 but the downstream signaling is unclear. HtrA2 and PINK1 loss of function causes parkinsonism in humans and animals. Here, we identified TRAP1 as an interactor of HtrA2 using an unbiased mass spectrometry approach. In our human cell models, TRAP1 overexpression is protective, rescuing HtrA2 and PINK1-associated mitochondrial dysfunction and suggesting that TRAP1 acts downstream of HtrA2 and PINK1. HtrA2 regulates TRAP1 protein levels, but TRAP1 is not a direct target of HtrA2 protease activity. Following genetic screening of Parkinson’s disease patients and healthy controls, we also report the first TRAP1 mutation leading to complete loss of functional protein in a patient with late onset Parkinson’s disease. Analysis of fibroblasts derived from the patient reveal that oxygen consumption, ATP output and reactive oxygen species are increased compared to healthy individuals. This is coupled with an increased pool of free NADH, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, triggering of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitivity to mitochondrial removal and apoptosis. These data highlight the role of TRAP1 in the regulation of energy metabolism and mitochondrial quality control. Interestingly, the diabetes drug metformin reverses mutation-associated alterations on energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and restores mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data show that TRAP1 acts downstream of PINK1 and HtrA2 for mitochondrial fine tuning, whereas TRAP1 loss of function leads to reduced control of energy metabolism, ultimately impacting mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings offer new insight into mitochondrial pathologies in Parkinson’s disease and provide new prospects for targeted therapies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 273 (34 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRare variant analysis of the PPMI dataset to uncover the complex genetic architecture of Parkinson’s disease
Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy UL; May, Patrick UL; Krüger, Rejko UL

in Movement Disorders (2017, June 02), 322(Supplement S2), 405

Objective: To unravel the genetic factors that play a role in PD we used the whole exome sequencing data available as a part of Parkinson Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). Background: Parkinson’s ... [more ▼]

Objective: To unravel the genetic factors that play a role in PD we used the whole exome sequencing data available as a part of Parkinson Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex disease. Besides variants in high-risk genes such as LRRK2 and PARK2, multiple genes associated to sporadic PD were discovered via genome-wide association studies. Yet, there is a large number of genetic factors that need to be deciphered. Methods: To unravel the genetic factors that play a role in PD we used the whole exome sequencing data available as a part of Parkinson Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The dataset comprised of 435 PD cases and 162 ethnically matched controls, respectively. We performed burden tests at single variant, gene and geneset levels on common and rare exonic and splice-variants. We also looked for severity of rare highly deleterious variants (CADD phred score>30) using the CADD score as well as singleton (variants seen in only one individual across cases and controls) rare variants. Additionally, we performed the functional enrichment analysis with the genes harboring rare highly deleterious variants (case uniq genes) that are only present in cases. Results: We observed an increased mutational burden of singleton variants in PD cases compared to the controls in nonsynonymous+LOF variants (empirical P-value 0.005) but not in the synonymous variants (empirical P-value 0.09). We observed a higher significant burden (P-value 0.028) as well as higher significant severity (empirical P-value 0.027) of rare, highly deleterious nonsynonymous variants, but not in the synonymous variants of the candidate genes (P-value 0.686, empirical P-value 0.556 for burden and severity respectively). The network analysis of genes having deleterious variants only present in cases (Case uniq) showed a significant increase in connectivity compared to random networks (P-value 0.0002). Pathway analysis of those genes showed a significant enrichment of pathways and biological process implicated in the nervous system functioning and the etiology of PD. Conclusions: Our study supports the complex disease notion of PD by highlighting the convoluted architecture of PD where case uniq genes including LRRK2 are implicated in several biological processes and pathways related to PD. The main finding of this study is to discover the complex genetics of PD at an exome wide level. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 258 (31 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroChip, an updated version of the NeuroX genotyping platform to rapidly screen for variants associated with neurological diseases
Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Faghri, Faraz; Pihlstrom, Lasse et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2017)

Genetics has proven to be a powerful approach in neurodegenerative diseases research, resulting in the identification of numerous causal and risk variants. Previously, we introduced the NeuroX Illumina ... [more ▼]

Genetics has proven to be a powerful approach in neurodegenerative diseases research, resulting in the identification of numerous causal and risk variants. Previously, we introduced the NeuroX Illumina genotyping array, a fast and efficient genotyping platform designed for the investigation of genetic variation in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we present its updated version, named NeuroChip. The NeuroChip is a low cost, custom-designed array containing a tagging variant backbone of about 306,670 variants complemented with a manually curated custom content comprised of 179,467 variants implicated in diverse neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and multiple system atrophy. The tagging backbone was chosen because of the low cost and good genome-wide resolution; the custom content can be combined with other backbones, like population or drug development arrays. Using the NeuroChip, we can accurately identify rare variants and impute over 5.3 million common SNPs from the latest release of the Haplotype Reference Consortium. In summary, we describe the design and usage of the NeuroChip array, and show its capability for detecting rare pathogenic variants in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. The NeuroChip has a more comprehensive and improved content, which makes it a reliable, high-throughput, cost-effective screening tool for genetic research and molecular diagnostics in neurodegenerative diseases. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 324 (68 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailApplication of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data
Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bridgers, Joshua et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2017)

The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly ... [more ▼]

The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients with IS or LGS. The contribution of autosomal recessive genetic variation, however, is less well understood. We implemented a rare variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to search for autosomal recessive epileptic encephalopathy genes in a cohort of 320 outbred patient–parent trios that were generally prescreened for rare metabolic disorders. In the current sample, our rare variant transmission disequilibrium test did not identify individual genes with significantly distorted transmission over expectation after correcting for the multiple tests. While the rare variant transmission disequilibrium test did not find evidence of a role for individual autosomal recessive genes, our current sample is insufficiently powered to assess the overall role of autosomal recessive genotypes in an outbred epileptic encephalopathy population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBiallelic Variants in OTUD6B Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome Associated with Seizures and Dysmorphic Features
Santiago-Sim, Teresa; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Ebstein, Frederic et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2017), 100(4), 676-688

Ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification that regulates many cellular processes including protein degradation, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and protein-protein interactions ... [more ▼]

Ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification that regulates many cellular processes including protein degradation, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and protein-protein interactions. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which reverse the process of ubiquitination, are important regulators of the ubiquitin system. OTUD6B encodes a member of the ovarian tumor domain (OTU)-containing subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes. Herein, we report biallelic pathogenic variants in OTUD6B in 12 individuals from 6 independent families with an intellectual disability syndrome associated with seizures and dysmorphic features. In subjects with predicted loss-of-function alleles, additional features include global developmental delay, microcephaly, absent speech, hypotonia, growth retardation with prenatal onset, feeding difficulties, structural brain abnormalities, congenital malformations including congenital heart disease, and musculoskeletal features. Homozygous Otud6b knockout mice were subviable, smaller in size, and had congenital heart defects, consistent with the severity of loss-of-function variants in humans. Analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from an affected subject showed reduced incorporation of 19S subunits into 26S proteasomes, decreased chymotrypsin-like activity, and accumulation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Our findings suggest a role for OTUD6B in proteasome function, establish that defective OTUD6B function underlies a multisystemic human disorder, and provide additional evidence for the emerging relationship between the ubiquitin system and human disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 144 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecessive mutations in SLC35A3 cause early onset epileptic encephalopathy with skeletal defects
Marini, Carla; Hardies, Katia; Pisano, Tiziana et al

in American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A (2017), 173(4), 1119-1123

We describe the clinical and whole genome sequencing (WGS) study of a non-consanguineous Italian family in which two siblings, a boy and a girl, manifesting a severe epileptic encephalopathy (EE) with ... [more ▼]

We describe the clinical and whole genome sequencing (WGS) study of a non-consanguineous Italian family in which two siblings, a boy and a girl, manifesting a severe epileptic encephalopathy (EE) with skeletal abnormalities, carried novel SLC35A3 compound heterozy- gous mutations. Both siblings exhibited infantile spasms, associated with focal, and tonic vibratory seizures from early infancy. EEG recordings showed a suppression-burst (SB) pattern and multifocal paroxysmal activity in both. In addition both had quadriplegia, acquired microcephaly, and severe intellectual disability. General examination showed distal arthrog- ryposis predominant in the hands in both siblings and severe left dorso-lumbar convex scoliosis in one. WGS of the siblings-parents quartet identified novel compound heterozygous mutations in SLC35A3 in both children. SLC35A3 encodes the major Golgi uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine transporter. With this study, we add SLC35A3 to the gene list of epilepsies. Neurological symptoms and skeletal abnormalities might result from impaired glycosylation of proteins involved in normal development and function of the central nervous system and skeletal apparatus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 153 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDe Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies.
Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi UL; Barisic, Nina et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2017), 100(1), 179-

In the list of consortium members for the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project, member Dina Amrom’s name was misspelled as Amron. The authors regret the error.

Detailed reference viewed: 160 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIDENTIFICATION OF A RARE GENE VARIANT THAT IS ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL ALZHEIMER DISEASE AND REGULATES APP EXPRESSION
Hartl, Daniela; May, Patrick UL; Gu, Wei UL et al

in Alzheimer's and Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2017), 13(7, Supplement), 648

Background Genetic mutations leading to familial forms of Alzheimer disease (AD) have so far been reported for a few genes including APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2, UNC5C, PLD3, ABCA7, TTC3, and possibly ADAM10 ... [more ▼]

Background Genetic mutations leading to familial forms of Alzheimer disease (AD) have so far been reported for a few genes including APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2, UNC5C, PLD3, ABCA7, TTC3, and possibly ADAM10. With the advent of whole exome and whole genome sequencing approaches new genes and mutations are likely to be identified. Methods We analyzed the genetic cause of AD in a large multiplex family with an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance with LOAD. The family lacked pathogenic mutations of known AD genes. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in six family members (two affected and four unaffected) and prioritized rare, potential damaging, variants that segregated with disease. Variants were further characterized by subsequent molecular analyzes in human brain and cell culture models. Results We identified a single rare nonsynonymous variant co-segregating with AD. The mutation inhibits pro-protein cleavage and the formation of the active enzyme, thus leading to a loss-of-function of the gene. We further found a strong negative correlation between the identified gene and APP gene expression in human brain and in cells over-expressing the gene. The negative regulation of APP expression was only observed for the wt gene, but not for mutated forms, thus causing beside the loss of enzyme function a decoupling of both APPexpression and subsequent beta-amyloid formation. The identity of the gene will be presented on the conference. Conclusions This novel pathway strongly supports a causative association of the identified gene with the pathogenesis of AD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 260 (26 UL)
Full Text
See detailReassessment Of Lesion-Associated Gene And Variant Pathogenicity In Focal Human Epilepsies
Neupert, Lisa Marie; Nothnagel, Michael; May, Patrick UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Purpose: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from Focal Cortical Dysplasia and low-grade epilepsy-associated tumor patients fostered large-scale genetic examination. However ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from Focal Cortical Dysplasia and low-grade epilepsy-associated tumor patients fostered large-scale genetic examination. However, assessment of germline and somatic variant pathogenicity remains difficult. Methods: Here, we critically reevaluated the pathogenicity for all neuropathology-associated variants reported to date in the PubMed and ClinVar databases, including 12 disease-related genes and 88 neuropathology-associated missense variants. We (1) assessed evolutionary gene constraint using the pLI and missense z scores, (2) applied guidelines by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG), and (3) predicted pathogenicity by using PolyPhen-2, CADD, and GERP. Results: Constraint analysis classified only seven out of 12 genes to be likely disease-associated, while 35 (40\%) of those 88 variants were classified as being variants of unknown significance (VUS) and 53 (60\%) as being likely pathogenic (LPII). Pathogenicity prediction yielded discrimination between neuropathology-associated variants (LPII and VUS) and rare variant scores obtained from individuals present in the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD). Conclusion: We conclude that several VUS are likely disease-associated and will be reclassified by future molecular evidence. In summary, interpretation of lesion-associated gene variants remains complex while the application of current ACMG guidelines including bioinformatic pathogenicity prediction will help improving interpretation and prediction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 170 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIMP: a pipeline for reproducible referenceindependent integrated metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses
Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Jarosz, Yohan UL; Muller, Emilie UL et al

in Genome Biology (2016), 17

Existing workflows for the analysis of multi-omic microbiome datasets are lab-specific and often result in sub-optimal data usage. Here we present IMP, a reproducible and modular pipeline for the ... [more ▼]

Existing workflows for the analysis of multi-omic microbiome datasets are lab-specific and often result in sub-optimal data usage. Here we present IMP, a reproducible and modular pipeline for the integrated and reference-independent analysis of coupled metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. IMP incorporates robust read preprocessing, iterative co-assembly, analyses of microbial community structure and function, automated binning, as well as genomic signature-based visualizations. The IMP-based data integration strategy enhances data usage, output volume, and output quality as demonstrated using relevant use-cases. Finally, IMP is encapsulated within a user-friendly implementation using Python and Docker. IMP is available at http://r3lab.uni.lu/web/imp/ (MIT license). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 343 (23 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTargeted sequencing of 351 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in a large cohort of patients
de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Kempen J.A. et al

in Molecular Genetics and Genomic Medicine (2016), 4(5), 568-80

Background Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional ... [more ▼]

Background Many genes are candidates for involvement in epileptic encephalopathy (EE) because one or a few possibly pathogenic variants have been found in patients, but insufficient genetic or functional evidence exists for a definite annotation. Methods To increase the number of validated EE genes, we sequenced 26 known and 351 candidate genes for EE in 360 patients. Variants in 25 genes known to be involved in EE or related phenotypes were followed up in 41 patients. We prioritized the candidate genes, and followed up 31 variants in this prioritized subset of candidate genes. Results Twenty-nine genotypes in known genes for EE (19) or related diseases (10), dominant as well as recessive or X-linked, were classified as likely pathogenic variants. Among those, likely pathogenic de novo variants were found in EE genes that act dominantly, including the recently identified genes EEF1A2, KCNB1 and the X-linked gene IQSEC2. A de novo frameshift variant in candidate gene HNRNPU was the only de novo variant found among the followed-up candidate genes, and the patient's phenotype was similar to a few recent publications. Conclusion Mutations in genes described in OMIM as, for example, intellectual disability gene can lead to phenotypes that get classified as EE in the clinic. We confirmed existing literature reports that de novo loss-of-function HNRNPUmutations lead to severe developmental delay and febrile seizures in the first year of life. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLoss of SYNJ1 dual phosphatase activity leads to early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline
Hardies, Katia; Cai, Yiying; Jardel, Claude et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2016)

SYNJ1 encodes a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase, synaptojanin 1, which contains two consecutive phosphatase domains and plays a prominent role in synaptic vesicle dynamics. Autosomal recessive inherited ... [more ▼]

SYNJ1 encodes a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase, synaptojanin 1, which contains two consecutive phosphatase domains and plays a prominent role in synaptic vesicle dynamics. Autosomal recessive inherited variants in SYNJ1 have previously been associated with two different neurological diseases: a recurrent homozygous missense variant (p.Arg258Gln) that abolishes Sac1 phosphatase activity was identified in three independent families with early onset parkinsonism, whereas a homozygous nonsense variant (p.Arg136*) causing a severe decrease of mRNA transcript was found in a single patient with intractable epilepsy and tau pathology. We performed whole exome or genome sequencing in three independent sib pairs with early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline, and identified novel segregating recessive SYNJ1 defects. A homozygous missense variant resulting in an amino acid substitution (p.Tyr888Cys) was found to impair, but not abolish, the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1, whereas three premature stop variants (homozygote p.Trp843* and compound heterozygote p.Gln647Argfs*6/p.Ser1122Thrfs*3) almost completely abolished mRNA transcript production. A genetic follow-up screening in a large cohort of 543 patients with a wide phenotypical range of epilepsies and intellectual disability revealed no additional pathogenic variants, showing that SYNJ1 deficiency is rare and probably linked to a specific phenotype. While variants leading to early onset parkinsonism selectively abolish Sac1 function, our results provide evidence that a critical reduction of the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1 underlies a severe disorder with neonatal refractory epilepsy and a neurodegenerative disease course. These findings further expand the clinical spectrum of synaptic dysregulation in patients with severe epilepsy, and emphasize the importance of this biological pathway in seizure pathophysiology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 201 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes
Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva; Dejanovic et al

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing ... [more ▼]

Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. Methods We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. Results and Interpretation We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10−4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 234 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe new Protein Topology Graph Library web server
Schäfer, Tim; Bruneß, Daniel; Scheck, Andreas et al

in Bioinformatics (2016), 32(3), 474-6

Summary: We present a new, extended version of the Protein Topology Graph Library (PTGL) web server. The PTGL describes the protein topology on the super-secondary structure level. It allows to compute ... [more ▼]

Summary: We present a new, extended version of the Protein Topology Graph Library (PTGL) web server. The PTGL describes the protein topology on the super-secondary structure level. It allows to compute and visualize protein ligand graphs and search for protein structural motifs. The new server features additional information on ligand binding to secondary structure elements (SSEs), increased usability, and an application programming interface (API) to retrieve data, allowing for an automated analysis of protein topology. Availability: The PTGL server is freely available on the web at http://ptgl.uni-frankfurt.de. The website is implemented in PHP, JavaScript, PostgreSQL and Apache. It is supported by all major browsers. The VPLG software that was used to compute the protein ligand graphs and all other data in the database is available under the GNU public license 2.0 from http://vplg.sourceforge.net. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 357 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIntegrated multi-omics of the human gut microbiome in a case study of familial type 1 diabetes.
Heintz, Anna UL; May, Patrick UL; Laczny, Cedric C. et al

in Nature Microbiology (2016), 2

The gastrointestinal microbiome is a complex ecosystem with functions that shape human health. Studying the relationship between taxonomic alterations and functional repercussions linked to disease ... [more ▼]

The gastrointestinal microbiome is a complex ecosystem with functions that shape human health. Studying the relationship between taxonomic alterations and functional repercussions linked to disease remains challenging. Here, we present an integrative approach to resolve the taxonomic and functional attributes of gastrointestinal microbiota at the metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic levels. We apply our methods to samples from four families with multiple cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Analysis of intra- and inter-individual variation demonstrates that family membership has a pronounced effect on the structural and functional composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome. In the context of T1DM, consistent taxonomic differences were absent across families, but certain human exocrine pancreatic proteins were found at lower levels. The associated microbial functional signatures were linked to metabolic traits in distinct taxa. The methodologies and results provide a foundation for future large-scale integrated multi-omic analyses of the gastrointestinal microbiome in the context of host-microbe interactions in human health and disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 561 (30 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIdentification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes from the human gastrointestinal tract
Laczny, Cedric Christian UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Heintz, Anna UL et al

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2016), 7(884),

Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference ... [more ▼]

Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference genomes. While the culture-independent recovery of population-level genomes from environmental samples using the binning of metagenomic data has expanded available reference genome catalogs, several microbial lineages remain underrepresented. Here, we present two reference-independent approaches for the identification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes. The first approach is aimed at genome recovery of varied taxa and involves multi-sample automated binning using CANOPY CLUSTERING complemented by visualization and human-augmented binning using VIZBINpost hoc. The second approach is particularly well-suited for the study of specific taxa and employs VIZBINde novo. Using these approaches, we reconstructed a total of six population-level genomes of distinct and divergent representatives of the Alphaproteobacteria class, the Mollicutes class, the Clostridiales order, and the Melainabacteria class from human gastrointestinal tract-derived metagenomic data. Our results demonstrate that, while automated binning approaches provide great potential for large-scale studies of mixed microbial communities, these approaches should be complemented with informative visualizations because expert-driven inspection and refinements are critical for the recovery of high-quality population-level genomes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 241 (16 UL)