References of "Martin, Romain 50002316"
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See detailThe importance of Human-Computer Interaction in Computer-Based Assessment
Martin, Romain UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Weinerth, Katja UL

Scientific Conference (2013, October 01)

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See detailLänderbericht Luxemburg: Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan)
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Martin, Romain UL

Presentation (2013, October)

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See detailBilingualism enriches the poor: Enhanced cognitive control in low-income minority children
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Cruz-Santos, A; Tourinho De Abreu Neto, Carlos José UL et al

Scientific Conference (2013, September 04)

Living in poverty is often accompanied by conditions that can negatively influence cognitive development. Is it possible that being bilingual might counteract these effects? Although previous research has ... [more ▼]

Living in poverty is often accompanied by conditions that can negatively influence cognitive development. Is it possible that being bilingual might counteract these effects? Although previous research has shown that being bilingual enhances executive functioning in middle-class children, less is known about how it affects lower income populations. This study was the first to explore whether the cognitive advantage associated with bilingualism in executive functioning extends to young immigrant children challenged by poverty and, if it does, which specific processes are most affected. A total of 80 second graders from low-income families participated in the study. Half of the children were first or second generation immigrants to Luxembourg, originally from Northern Portugal, who spoke both Luxembourgish and Portuguese on a daily basis. The other matched half of children lived in Northern Portugal and spoke only Portuguese. Children completed measures of vocabulary and visuospatial tests of working memory, abstract reasoning, selective attention, and interference suppression. Two broad cognitive factors of executive functioning — representation (abstract reasoning and working memory) and control (selective attention and interference suppression) — emerged from principal component analysis. Although the bilingual children knew fewer words than their monolingual peers, and did not show an advantage in representation, the bilinguals performed significantly better than did the monolinguals in cognitive control. These results demonstrate, first, that the bilingual advantage is neither confounded with nor limited by socioeconomic and cultural factors and, second, that separable aspects of executive functioning are differentially affected by bilingualism. The bilingual advantage lies in control but not in visuospatial representational processes. This is the first study to show that, although they may face linguistic challenges, minority bilingual children from low-income families demonstrate important strengths in other cognitive domains. The study therefore informs efforts to reduce the achievement gap between children of different socioeconomic backgrounds. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of predictors of emergent literacy
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Merrell, Christine; Ferring, Dieter UL et al

in The 16th European Conference on Developmental Psychology (2013, September)

Two studies examined the predictive value of a range of variables associated with young children on their later literacy. Study 1 involved children age 5 to 7 from Serbia (N = 159); Study 2 engaged ... [more ▼]

Two studies examined the predictive value of a range of variables associated with young children on their later literacy. Study 1 involved children age 5 to 7 from Serbia (N = 159); Study 2 engaged children age 4 to 6 from Luxembourg (N = 174). Children in Study 1 were assessed on entry to school, aged 5, and again at age 7. Children in Study 2 were assessed once, in preschool. In Study 1, multilevel models indicated that a baseline assessment administrated in school language at the age of 5, in particular with respect to their competence in mathematics, were the most significant predictors of children’s emergent literacy at the age of 7 after controlling for age, gender, vocabulary, and phonological awareness. In Study 2, gender, vocabulary, phonological awareness, and competence in mathematics at the age of 5 were significant predictors of emergent literacy at the same age, after controlling for age, test administered in school language, and behavior. The level of parental education in Study 1 and the children’s behavior in both studies proved not to be significant. Both studies have important educational implications, suggesting that practitioners should assess language-minority children at the start of school in their mother tongue and act upon the outcomes of those assessments to avoid later literacy problems. [less ▲]

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See detailLehrerurteile sagen Lebensläufe voraus
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis et al

Scientific Conference (2013, September)

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See detailLEARN stellt sech fier
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Hoffmann, Danielle UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

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See detailHow well does ‚general language proficiency’ explain language test performance?
Reichert, Monique UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Martin, Romain UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August 28)

The current research addresses the seemingly contradiction between the multiple findings of C-tests loading on a single general language proficiency (GLP) factor on the one hand, and the assumption that ... [more ▼]

The current research addresses the seemingly contradiction between the multiple findings of C-tests loading on a single general language proficiency (GLP) factor on the one hand, and the assumption that language proficiency as considered by language testing researchers is multi-dimensional. Research on the structure of language proficiency and in psycholinguistics suggests that GLP may best be represented as the common core across diverse language measures. In the present research, it is hypothesized that C-tests are excellent measures of this common core. In contrast, other language measures, beyond putting demands on GLP, are assumed to tap unique processes, explaining why multi-dimensionality often best reflects the structure of language measures. The current research addresses this hypothesis by examining structural equation models that evaluate alternative assumptions about the dimensionality of language proficiency. 222 students from the highest academic school track in Luxembourg completed a French C-test, as well as the Test de Connaissance du Français (TCF), encompassing measures of reading, listening, speaking and writing. The results show that the four TCF measures put extra demands on unique processes, whereas the C-test measured GLP only. The findings point out that the C-test should not be expected to replace measures of the four basic language skills, i.e., of reading and listening comprehension, or of written and spoken production, when a clear diagnostic of language proficiency in one of those domains is needed. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Usability on Computer-Based Concept Maps in Educational Assessment
Weinerth, Katja UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Brunner, Martin et al

Presentation (2013, July 03)

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See detailBilingualism Enriches the Poor: Enhanced Cognitive Control in Low-Income Minority Children
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Cruz-Santos, A; Tourinho De Abreu Neto, Carlos José UL et al

Poster (2013, June 24)

This study explores whether the cognitive advantage associated with bilingualism in executive functioning extends to young children challenged by poverty and if so, which specific processes are most ... [more ▼]

This study explores whether the cognitive advantage associated with bilingualism in executive functioning extends to young children challenged by poverty and if so, which specific processes are most affected. Forty Portuguese-Luxembourgish bilingual children from low-income immigrant families in Luxembourg and 40 matched monolingual children from Portugal completed visuo-spatial tests of working memory, abstract reasoning, selective attention, and interference suppression. Two broad cognitive factors of executive functioning labeled representation (abstract reasoning and working memory) and control (selective attention and interference suppression) emerged from principal components analysis. Whereas there were no group differences in representation, the bilinguals performed significantly better than the monolinguals in control. These results demonstrate first, that the bilingual advantage is neither confounded with nor limited by socioeconomic and cultural factors and second, that separable aspects of executive functioning are differentially affected by bilingualism. The bilingual advantage lies in control but not in visuo-spatial representational processes. [less ▲]

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See detailA meta-analysis of the effectiveness of bilingual programs in Europe
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Martin, Romain UL

in The 9th International Symposium on Bilingualism (2013, June)

The effectiveness of bilingual programs for promoting academic achievement of language-minority in the United States has been examined in six meta-analyses. The present meta-analytic study investigates ... [more ▼]

The effectiveness of bilingual programs for promoting academic achievement of language-minority in the United States has been examined in six meta-analyses. The present meta-analytic study investigates this topic for the first time in the European context. Thorough literature searches uncovered 101 European studies, with only seven meeting the inclusion criteria. Two studies were excluded from further analyses. Results from the random-effects model of the five remaining studies indicate a small positive effect (g = 0.23; 95% CI [0.10, 0.36]) for bilingual over submersion programs on reading of language-minority children. Thus, this meta-analysis supports bilingual education—that is, including the home language of language-minority children—in school instruction. However, the generalizability of the results is limited by the small number of studies on this topic. More published studies on bilingual education in Europe are needed as well as closer attention to the size of the effects. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation externe d’un lycée-pilote au Luxembourg – utilisation de questionnaires en miroir pour comparer l’opinion des différents acteurs de la communauté scolaire.
Villanyi, Denise UL; Mancuso, Giovanna UL; Poncelet, Débora UL et al

in Actes du 25ème colloque de l’ADMEE-Europe Fribourg 2013 : Evaluation et autoévaluation, quels espaces de formation (2013)

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See detailDo teacher judgments of student intelligence predict life outcomes?
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Preckel, Franzis et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2013), 27

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See detailEffects of impoverished environmental conditions on working memory performance
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Puglisi, M.; Cruz-Santos, A. et al

in Memory (2013), Mar 26. [Epub ahead of print]

This cross-cultural study investigates the impact of background experience on four verbal and visuo-spatial working memory (WM) tasks. Eighty-four children from low income families were recruited from the ... [more ▼]

This cross-cultural study investigates the impact of background experience on four verbal and visuo-spatial working memory (WM) tasks. Eighty-four children from low income families were recruited from the following groups: (1) Portuguese immigrant children from Luxembourg impoverished in terms of language experience; (2) Brazilian children deprived in terms of scholastic background; (3) Portuguese children from Portugal with no disadvantage in either scholastic or language background. Children were matched on age, gender, fluid intelligence, and socioeconomic status and completed four simple and complex span tasks of WM and a vocabulary measure. Results indicate that despite large differences in their backgrounds and language abilities, the groups exhibited comparable performance on the visuo-spatial tasks dot matrix and odd-one-out and on the verbal simple span task digit recall. Group differences emerged on the verbal complex span task counting recall with children from Luxembourg and Portugal outperforming children from disadvantaged schools in Brazil. The study suggests that whereas contributions of prior knowledge to digit span, dot matrix, and odd-one-out are likely to be minimal, background experience can affect performance on counting recall. Implications for testing WM capacity in children growing up in poverty are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Complex Problem Solving Simulations for General Cognitive Ability Assessment: the Genetics Lab Framework
Mayer, Hélène; Hazotte, Cyril; Djaghloul, Younes et al

in International Journal of Information Science and Intelligent System (2013), 2(4), 71-88

This paper presents the conception and operation of “the Genetics Lab,” a research platform designed for general intelligence measurement. This tool has been developed and refined to measure cognitive ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the conception and operation of “the Genetics Lab,” a research platform designed for general intelligence measurement. This tool has been developed and refined to measure cognitive skills of students in Luxembourg, Thanks to its generic and clear architecture, “the Genetics Lab” makes a major contribution by addressing technical weaknesses and flaws met with tools previously used to assess intelligence. This new platform can be used as groundwork for other evaluation solutions. In this paper, we explore in depth the main fields of e-assessment such as instructions, localized and multilingual content production and display, traces, and scoring. We also describe how the platform was put into action to create complex simulations and to make data collection resulting from the user’s test a flawless process. This paper is a continuation and extension of earlier work. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 153 (11 UL)