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See detailReduced early visual processing of own body images in anorexia nervosa: An event-related potentials study
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

Poster (2016)

Introduction. Although body image distortion in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been extensively studied over the past decades, its underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Neuro-imaging studies have ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Although body image distortion in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been extensively studied over the past decades, its underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Neuro-imaging studies have identified functional and structural alterations in brain areas involved in visual body perception, but the time course of visual body processing in AN remains mostly unexplored. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate single processing steps along the time course, particularly the visual processing of physical body image characteristics (featural processing, P1) and the recognition of a body as such (configural processing, N1). Methods. Twenty in-patients with AN, and 20 healthy women viewed photographs of themselves, of another woman’s body and of their own and another woman’s standardized object (cup) with concurrent EEG recording. Results. Body images elicited an accentuation of the P1 component (105-160 ms), which was absent for the comparison between own-body and own-cup images in the AN group. Results regarding the N1 component suggest alterations in object processing in AN. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that individuals with AN show reduced featural processing of their own body image, a process which, due to its position early in the visual processing stream, is unlikely to involve higher cognitive stimulus processing. This suggests a possible role of previously undetected pre-conscious mechanisms in body image disturbance. [less ▲]

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See detailGastrische Modulation der Schreckreaktion und gastrisch-evozierte Potenziale: zwei neue psychophysiologische Indikatoren für Interozeption des gastrointestinalen Systems
Schulz, André UL; Schaan, L.; Van Dyck, Zoé UL et al

in Kathmann, N. (Ed.) 42. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn Abstractband (2016)

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See detailZentralnervöse Verarbeitung von Körpersignalen bei Anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, Ulrich et al

Scientific Conference (2015, April)

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See detailInteroception in anorexia nervosa: evidence at cortical and self-report levels
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, Ulrich et al

in 45th Annual Congress of the European Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies (EABCT) (2015)

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See detailAffektive Bewertung von Körperbildern bei Anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, C.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Wittchen, H.-U.; Härtling, S.; Hoyer, J. (Eds.) Abstractband - Wieviel Psychologie steckt in der Psychotherapie? (2015)

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See detailShort-term food deprivation increases amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked potentials
Schulz, André UL; Ferreira de Sá, D. S.; Dierolf, Angelika UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(5), 695-703

Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate ... [more ▼]

Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate days: when satiated (standardized food intake) and after an 18 h food deprivation period. On both days, heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs) and cardiac and ANS activation indices (heart rate, nLF HRV) were assessed. The HEP is an EEG pattern that is considered an index of cortical representation of afferent cardiovascular signals. Average HEP activity (R-wave +455-595 ms) was enhanced during food deprivation compared to normal food intake. Cardiac activation did not differ between nutritional conditions. Our results indicate that short-term food deprivation amplifies an electrophysiological correlate of the cortical representation of visceral-afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system. This effect could not be attributed to increased cardiac activation, as estimated by heart rate and nLF HRV, after food deprivation. [less ▲]

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See detailGastrische Modulation der Schreckreaktion: eine prä-attentive Methode zur Abbildung afferenter Signale aus dem gastrointestinalen System
Schulz, André UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Lutz, Annika UL et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailGastrisch-evozierte Potenziale: ein neurophysiologischer Indikator für die kortikale Repräsentation afferenter Signale aus dem gastrointestinalen System
Schaan, L.; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Lutz, Annika UL et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailZentralnervöse Verarbeitung von Körpersignalen bei Anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, U. et al

in Kaiser, J.; Fiebach, C. (Eds.) 41. Tagung Psychologie und Gehirn - Abstracts der Beiträge (2015)

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See detailBody perception and evaluation in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Body image disturbance is a prominent feature in anorexia nervosa (AN) and encompasses alterations across the different dimensions of body image, that is, perception, affect, cognition, and behaviour ... [more ▼]

Body image disturbance is a prominent feature in anorexia nervosa (AN) and encompasses alterations across the different dimensions of body image, that is, perception, affect, cognition, and behaviour. There is a wealth of research regarding the subjective experience of body image disturbance and evidence for underlying neuronal alterations is beginning to emerge. The present project was designed to assess basic processes underlying body image disturbance with the help of psychophysiological measurement techniques and self-other discrimination tasks. In study 1, using a self-other discrimination task with distorted body images, we were able to demonstrate interactions between perceptual factors and cognitive bias which may sustain a distorted and negative body image in healthy women. Study 2 showed a discrepancy between explicit negative ratings for body shapes and implicit neutral affect towards the same images, as assessed with an affective startle-modulation paradigm, in healthy women and women with AN. These results suggest that automatic fear responses to fat-distorted self-body pictures, as well as implicit approach motivation towards thin body images, as reported in previous studies, are not present in all patients with AN. In study 3 a differential alteration of featural and configural visual processing of body images was detected in an event-related brain potentials (EEG-ERP) paradigm. Individuals with AN showed a lack of discrimination between self-body and self-object pictures between 105 and 160 ms after stimulus onset (P1 component, featural processing) and an enhanced processing of body relative to neutral object pictures between 160 and 225 ms after stimulus onset (N1 component, configural processing). This suggests alterations in the basic visual processing of body shapes in AN, which might be related to influences of top-down attentional modulation. Study 4 showed enhanced processing of cardiac visceral signals in the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with AN, which might either be a marker of psychopathology, in particular anxiety, or an indication of clinical improvement. In summary, the present results do not support the view of a global perceptual deficit in AN, but demonstrate the complexity of body image alterations in AN. It appears mandatory to further investigate basic processes underlying body image disturbances in AN and in healthy women to arrive at a comprehensive understanding of their nature and to provide a theoretical basis for body image interventions. The importance of using specific assessment methods, such as indicators of body-related processing in the CNS, is highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailBody or cup? Alterations in featural and configural body image processing in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(supplement 1), 123

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See detailFood-cue affected motor response inhibition and self-reported dieting success: a pictorial affective shifting task
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Krawietz, Vera et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2014), 5(216),

Behavioral inhibition is one of the basic facets of executive functioning and is closely related to self-regulation. Impulsive reactions, i.e. low inhibitory control, have been associated with higher body ... [more ▼]

Behavioral inhibition is one of the basic facets of executive functioning and is closely related to self-regulation. Impulsive reactions, i.e. low inhibitory control, have been associated with higher body-mass-index (BMI), binge eating, and other problem behaviors (e.g. substance abuse, pathological gambling, etc.). Nevertheless, studies which investigated the direct influence of food-cues on behavioral inhibition have been fairly inconsistent. In the current studies, we investigated food-cue affected behavioral inhibition in young women. For this purpose, we used a go/no-go task with pictorial food and neutral stimuli in which stimulus-response mapping is reversed after every other block (affective shifting task). In study 1, hungry participants showed faster reaction times to and omitted fewer food than neutral targets. Low dieting success and higher BMI were associated with behavioral disinhibition in food relative to neutral blocks. In study 2, both hungry and satiated individuals were investigated. Satiation did not influence overall task performance, but modulated associations of task performance with dieting success and self-reported impulsivity. When satiated, increased food craving during the task was associated with low dieting success, possibly indicating a preload-disinhibition effect following food intake. Food-cues elicited automatic action and approach tendencies regardless of dieting success, self-reported impulsivity, or current hunger levels. Yet, associations between dieting success, impulsivity, and behavioral food-cue responses were modulated by hunger and satiation. Future research investigating clinical samples and including other salient non-food stimuli as control category is warranted. [less ▲]

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See detailImpulsive reactions to food-cues predict subsequent food craving
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2014), 15

Low inhibitory control has been associated with overeating and addictive behaviors. Inhibitory control can modulate cue-elicited craving in social or alcohol-dependent drinkers, and trait impulsivity may ... [more ▼]

Low inhibitory control has been associated with overeating and addictive behaviors. Inhibitory control can modulate cue-elicited craving in social or alcohol-dependent drinkers, and trait impulsivity may also play a role in food-cue reactivity. The current study investigated food-cue affected response inhibition and its relationship to food craving using a stop-signal task with pictures of food and neutral stimuli. Participants responded slower to food pictures as compared to neutral pictures. Reaction times in response to food pictures positively predicted scores on the Food Cravings Questionnaire – State (FCQ-S) after the task and particularly scores on its hunger subscale. Lower inhibitory performance in response to food pictures predicted higher FCQ-S scores and particularly those related to a desire for food and lack of control over consumption. Task performance was unrelated to current dieting or other measures of habitual eating behaviors. Results support models on interactive effects of top-down inhibitory control processes and bottom-up hedonic signals in the self-regulation of eating behavior, such that low inhibitory control specifically in response to appetitive stimuli is associated with increased craving, which may ultimately result in overeating. [less ▲]

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See detailResisting high calorie foods: Heart rate variability as an indicator of self-regulatory processes in restrained eating behaviour
Lutz, Annika UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in André, C; Bohn, T; Evers, D (Eds.) et al Nutrition, chronic health complications, and healthy ageing (2013, October 25)

INTRODUCTION. In our affluent western society many people, especially young women, try to restrict their food intake in order to conform to the society’s thin ideal in spite of the omnipresence of high ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION. In our affluent western society many people, especially young women, try to restrict their food intake in order to conform to the society’s thin ideal in spite of the omnipresence of high-calorie foods. However, this dieting behaviour is often linked to eating binges, leads to weight gain in the long run, and is the best established risk factor for eating disorders. Therefore, it is of great importance to study the factors associated with successful vs. unsuccessful control of eating behaviour. Restrained eaters are people who habitually try to resist high calorie foods in order to restrict their food intake and have been shown to be prone to a breakdown of self-regulation. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a psychophysiological measure calculated from heart rate. It serves as an indicator of self-regulatory capacity and effort because of neural linkages between heart and brain. Resisting high calorie foods is associated with an increase of state-HRV and temporarily depletes self-regulatory resources, a mechanism which could explain breakdowns in self-regulation of food intake. Therefore, the current study investigated the changes in HRV during confrontation with high vs. low calorie foods in restrained and unrestrained eaters. METHOD. After a three hour-fast, 60 female university students were exposed to either high (brownie) or low calorie food (carrot). They were asked to look at the food and smell it, but to refrain from eating it. Heart rate was continuously recorded during exposure, as well as during rest before and after exposure. Restrained eating was assessed with the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire. RESULTS. HRV increased during exposure. This increase was characterised by an interaction of exposure condition and restrained eating. In the high-calorie condition, HRV increase was related to restrained eating. The higher the restrained eating scores, the stronger was the increase in HRV. In the low-calorie condition there was no significant association between HRV and restrained eating. DISCUSSION. The results suggest increased self-regulatory effort in highly restrained eaters when exposed to high calorie foods. In addition, restrained eaters seem to have spared their self-regulatory resources when exposed to diet-congruent low calorie food. These findings provide first insights into dietary strategies at a basic self-regulation level, using psychophysiological methods. In the long run, a detailed understanding of basic self-regulatory mechanisms in dietary restriction will help to develop strategies for healthy eating behaviour in normal-weight and over-weight populations. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart rate variability as an indicator of self-regulatory processes in restrained eating behaviour
Lutz, Annika UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in Psychophysiology (2013, September), 50(S1), 81

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See detailHerzratenvariabilität als Indikator für Selbstregulationsprozesse bei gezügeltem Essverhalten
Lutz, Annika UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in 11. Kongress der Fachgruppe Gesundheitspsychologie: Selbstregulation und Gesundheit: Abstractband des Kongresses (2013)

EINFÜHRUNG. Gezügelte Esser unterwerfen ihr Essverhalten einer ausgeprägten kognitiven Kontrolle. Sie versuchen andauernd, hochkalorische Nahrungsmittel zu vermeiden und diesen zu widerstehen. Dabei sind ... [more ▼]

EINFÜHRUNG. Gezügelte Esser unterwerfen ihr Essverhalten einer ausgeprägten kognitiven Kontrolle. Sie versuchen andauernd, hochkalorische Nahrungsmittel zu vermeiden und diesen zu widerstehen. Dabei sind sie jedoch sehr anfällig für ein kurzfristiges Versagen der Selbstregulation. Herzratenvariabilität (HRV) ist ein Indikator für Selbstregulationskapazität und -anstrengung. Sie steigt während des Versuchs, einem hochkalorischen Nahrungsmittel zu widerstehen, kurzfristig an. Im Anschluss an eine solche Anstrengung sind die Selbstregulationsressourcen vorübergehend erschöpft. Auf Grundlage dieser Befunde wurden in der vorliegenden Studie Veränderungen der HRV während der Konfrontation mit hoch- vs. niedrigkalorischen Nahrungsmitteln bei gezügelten und ungezügelten Essern untersucht. METHODIK. Nach dreistündigem Fasten wurden 60 Studentinnen entweder mit einem hochkalorischen (Brownie) oder mit einem niedrigkalorischen (Karotte) Nahrungsmittel konfrontiert. Sie wurden gebeten, das Nahrungsmittel zu betrachten und seinen Geruch wahrzunehmen, es aber nicht zu essen. Währenddessen wurde kontinuierlich die Herzrate aufgezeichnet. Zusätzlich fanden Ruhemessungen vor und nach der Konfrontation statt. Gezügeltes Essverhalten wurde mit dem Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire erfasst. ERGEBNISSE. Gezügelte Esser zeigten während der Konfrontation mit hochkalorischen Nahrungsmitteln einen stärkeren Anstieg der HRV als während der Konfrontation mit niedrigkalorischen Nahrungsmitteln. Bei ungezügelten Essern stieg die HRV in beiden Bedingungen gleich stark an. SCHLUSSFOLGERUNGEN. Gezügelte Esser setzen bei der Konfrontation mit hochkalorischen Nahrungsmitteln vermehrt Selbstregulationsressourcen ein, um sich zu kontrollieren. Bei der Konfrontation mit niedrigkalorischen Nahrungsmitteln, die den Erfolg ihrer Diät nicht bedrohen, scheint dies nur in geringem Maß nötig zu sein. Möglicherweise handelt es sich hier um eine Strategie zur Schonung von Selbstregulationsressourcen, um diese effektiver für die Vermeidung hochkalorischer Nahrungsmittel einsetzen zu können. Die Verwendung psychophysiologischer Methoden erweist sich als vielversprechender Ansatz zur Untersuchung grundlegender Selbstregulationsprozesse im Bereich des gezügelten Essverhaltens. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-reported dieting success is associated with cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2012), 59(2)

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students ... [more ▼]

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students (N = 50) indicated if they were currently trying to control their weight and completed the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS). Heart beat intervals were recorded during two 10 min relaxation periods from which parameters of vagal-cardiac control (high frequency power in normalized units, HF n.u.) and sympathovagal balance (ratio of low and high frequency power, LF/HF) were calculated. In current dieters, self-reported dieting success was positively associated with HF and negatively associated with LF/HF. These associations were independent of current body-mass and food deprivation (i.e. hours since the last meal). We conclude that vagal-cardiac control reflects self-regulatory strength, rather than nutritional status, in current dieters. [less ▲]

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