References of "Litina, Anastasia 50002221"
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See detailThe Cultural Transmission of Environmental Preferences: Evidence from International Migration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL; Moriconi, Simone

Scientific Conference (2014, June 30)

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this component, we exploit variation associated with international migration flows. We find that the environmental attitudes of migrants, while being resilient to environmental conditions, also embed a cultural component, which persists till the second generation migrants. Our results suggest that, in the presence of multiple environmental problems that require collective action, comprehending the driving forces behind the formation of an environmental culture is critical to design effective policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (8 UL)
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See detailCorruption, Tax Evasion and Social Values
Litina, Anastasia UL; Palivos, Theodore

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We provide empirical support and a theoretical explanation for the vicious circle of political corruption and tax evasion in which countries often fall into. We address this issue in the context of a ... [more ▼]

We provide empirical support and a theoretical explanation for the vicious circle of political corruption and tax evasion in which countries often fall into. We address this issue in the context of a model with two distinct groups of agents: citizens and politicians. Citizens decide the fraction of their income for which they evade taxes. Politicians decide the fraction of the public budget that they peculate. We show that multiple self-fulfilling equilibria with different levels of corruption can emerge based on the existence of strategic complementarities, indicating that corruption may corrupt. Furthermore, we find that standard deterrence policies cannot eliminate multiplicity. Instead, policies that impose a strong moral cost on tax evaders and corrupt politicians can lead to a unique equilibrium. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (5 UL)
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See detailGreat Expectations: The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

Scientific Conference (2014, June 12)

This research establishes the persistent effect of institutions on culture exploiting the natural experiment of migration. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that lower institutional ... [more ▼]

This research establishes the persistent effect of institutions on culture exploiting the natural experiment of migration. It advances and empirically establishes the hypothesis that lower institutional quality at the origin country of a migrant is associated with higher trust towards host country institutions. The inflated trust of migrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect and is intriguing in three respects. First it contradicts with the empirically observed attitude of migrants with respect to interpersonal trust, where low quality of institutions is associated with lower interpersonal trust in both the host and the home country. Second, the inflated trust persists for both first and second generation migrants. Third, the effect of home institutions is stronger than the effect of mean trust at home confirming that institutions prevail over culture. The formation of Great Expectations has profound policy implications as it generates lower demand for regulation and reduced political participation. These findings further highlight the interplay between culture and institutions and the spillover effects of institutions operating via migration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 UL)
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See detailThe Geographical Origins of Early State Formation
Litina, Anastasia UL

Scientific Conference (2014, May)

This research theoretically and empirically advances the hypothesis that in early stages of development land and climatic variability had a persistent beneficial effect on the advent of early statehood. A ... [more ▼]

This research theoretically and empirically advances the hypothesis that in early stages of development land and climatic variability had a persistent beneficial effect on the advent of early statehood. A high degree of diversity, and its association with potential gains from trade accentuated the incentives to develop social, political and physical infrastructure that could facilitate interregional interaction. Hence, the emergence of states, was expedited in more diverse geographical environments. Exploiting exogenous sources of variation in variability in land suitability for agriculture across countries as well as variation in climatic variability within countries over the period 500-1500 CE, the research establishes that: i) the advent of statehood was expedited in regions characterized by a higher degree of variability in agricultural suitability and climatic conditions, ii) the effect of variability on statehood operates through the advancement of medium of exchange and transportation, suggesting that it is the pivotal role of states in facilitating trade that ultimately contributed to their emergence and consolidation, and iii) the effect of land variability on statehood dissipates over time. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (24 UL)
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See detailGreat Expectations: The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

Presentation (2014)

This research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the ... [more ▼]

This research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the institutions at the host country. This inflated trust of immigrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect. This result is interesting and intriguing for several reasons. First, it highlights the persistent effect of institutions (at the origin country) on the cultural attitudes of immigrants. Interestingly, this effect is rather persistent and can be detected even to the second generation immigrants. Second, the analysis explores whether mean attitudes at the origin country have an effect on immigrants' attitude. The findings suggest that mean attitudes do not confer a statistically significant effect, whereas a horserace between origin institutions and origin culture suggests that it is the effect of institutions that prevails. Last, the analysis establishes that the inflated trust of immigrants affects their political attitudes. Immigrants coming from corrupt countries tend to be less interested in politics, to overtrust the host governments and to be less active in the political arena. In a globalized world where international immigration is rather extensive, pinning down the cultural differences across immigrants and thus the differences in their political attitudes is of an essence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (7 UL)
See detailDissecting the Act of God: An Exploration of the effect of Religion on Economic Activity
Carpantier, Jean-Francois UL; Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This research establishes that religiosity has a persistent effect on economic outcomes. First we use a sample of migrants in the US to establish that religiosity at the country of origin has a long ... [more ▼]

This research establishes that religiosity has a persistent effect on economic outcomes. First we use a sample of migrants in the US to establish that religiosity at the country of origin has a long lasting effect on the religiosity of migrants. Second, exploiting variations in the inherited component of religiosity of migrants, our analysis uncovers the causal effect of religiosity on economic activity using a panel of countries for the period 1935-2000. The empirical findings suggest that i) church attendance has a positive impact on economic outcomes; ii) religious beliefs in the existence of god, hell, heaven and miracles have no systematic effect on economic outcomes, and iii) stronger faith is associated with prosperity. Moreover we extend our analysis to uncover the channels via which religiosity operates. Notably, the positive effect of religious participation and of stronger faith on economic outcomes operates via the creation of social capital and the development of traits, such as hard work and thrift, that are conducive to growth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (7 UL)
See detailNatural Land Productivity, Cooperation and Comparative Development
Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This research advances the hypothesis that natural land productivity in the past, and its effect on the desirable level of cooperation in the agricultural sector, had a persistent effect on the evolution ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that natural land productivity in the past, and its effect on the desirable level of cooperation in the agricultural sector, had a persistent effect on the evolution of social capital, the process of industrialization and comparative economic development across the globe. Exploiting exogenous sources of variations in land productivity across a) countries; b) individuals within a country, and c) migrants of different ancestry within a country, the research establishes that lower level of land productivity in the past is associated with more intense cooperation and higher levels of contemporary social capital and development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (6 UL)
See detailGreat Expectations - The Persistent Effect of Institutions on Culture
Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

his research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the ... [more ▼]

his research exploits the event of immigration to establish that institutions have a persistent effect on culture. It is argued that immigrants coming from corrupt countries, tend to overtrust the institutions at the host country. This inflated trust of immigrants is documented as the Great Expectations effect. This result is interesting and intriguing for several reasons. First, it highlights the persistent effect of institutions (at the origin coun- try) on the cultural attitudes of immigrants. Interestingly, this effect is rather persistent and can be detected even to the second generation immigrants. Second, the analysis explores whether mean attitudes at the origin country have an effect on immigrants. attitude. The findings suggest that mean attitudes do not confer a statistically significant effect, whereas a horserace between origin institutions and origin culture suggests that it is the effect of institutions that prevails. Last, the analysis establishes that the inflated trust of immigrants affects their political attitudes. Immigrants coming from corrupt countries tend to be less interested in politics, to overtrust the host governments and to be less active in the political arena. In a globalized world where international immigration is rather extensive, pinning down the cultural differences across immigrants and thus the differences in their political attitudes is of an essence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (4 UL)
See detailNatural Land Productivity, Cooperation and Comparative Development
Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

ssion Paper Series 14-16, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg. Abstract: This research advances the hypothesis that natural land productivity in the past, and its effect on ... [more ▼]

ssion Paper Series 14-16, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg. Abstract: This research advances the hypothesis that natural land productivity in the past, and its effect on the desirable level of cooperation in the agricultural sector, had a persistent effect on the evolution of social capital, the process of industrialization and comparative economic development across the globe. Exploiting exogenous sources of variations in land productivity across a) countries; b) individuals within a country, and c) migrants of different ancestry within a country, the research establishes that lower level of land productivity in the past is associated with more intense cooperation and higher levels of contemporary social capital and development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (9 UL)
See detailThe Geographical Origins of Early State Formation
Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

his research theoretically and empirically advances the hypothesis that in early stages of development, land and climatic variability had a persistent beneficial effect on the advent of early statehood. A ... [more ▼]

his research theoretically and empirically advances the hypothesis that in early stages of development, land and climatic variability had a persistent beneficial effect on the advent of early statehood. A high degree of land and climatic diversity, and its association with potential gains from trade, accentuated the incentives to develop social, political and physical infrastructure that could facilitate interregional interaction. Hence, the emergence of states was expedited in more diverse geographical environments. To explore the hypotheses the analysis exploits exogenous sources of variation in a) the measure of land variability across countries, and b) climatic variability within countries over the period 500-1500 CE. The research establishes that i) the advent of statehood was expedited in regions characterized by a higher degree of variability in land and climatic conditions, ii) the effect of (land and climatic) variability on statehood operates partly through the advancement of technologies associated with trade, thus suggesting that it is the pivotal role of states in facilitating trade that ultimately contributed to their emergence and consolidation, and, iii) the effect of land variability on statehood dissipates over time [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (4 UL)
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See detailDissecting the Act of God: An Exploration of the Effect of Religion on Economic Activity
Litina, Anastasia UL; Carpantier, Jean-Francois UL

Presentation (2014)

This research establishes that religiosity has a persistent effect on economic outcomes. First we use a sample of migrants in the US to establish that religiosity at the country of origin has a long ... [more ▼]

This research establishes that religiosity has a persistent effect on economic outcomes. First we use a sample of migrants in the US to establish that religiosity at the country of origin has a long lasting effect on the religiosity of migrants. Second, exploiting variations in the inherited component of religiosity of migrants, our analysis uncovers the causal effect of religiosity on economic activity using a panel of countries for the period 1935-2000. The empirical findings suggest that i) church attendance has a positive impact on economic outcomes; ii) religious beliefs in the existence of god, hell, heaven and miracles have no systematic effect on economic outcomes, and iii) stronger faith is associated with prosperity. Moreover we extend our analysis to uncover the channels via which religiosity operates. Notably, the positive effect of religious participation and of stronger faith on economic outcomes operates via the creation of social capital and the development of traits, such as hard work and thrift, that are conducive to growth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (5 UL)
See detailThe cultural transmission of Environmental preferences: Evidence from International Migration
Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL; Litina, Anastasia UL; Moriconi, Simone

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (6 UL)
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See detailGrowth-Friendly Dictatorships
Da Luca, Giacomo; Litina, Anastasia UL; Sekeris, Petros

E-print/Working paper (2012)

In this paper we show that in highly unequal societies, different societal groups may support a rent-seeking dicator serving their interests better than the median voter in a democratic regime ... [more ▼]

In this paper we show that in highly unequal societies, different societal groups may support a rent-seeking dicator serving their interests better than the median voter in a democratic regime. Importantly, it is the stakes of dictator in the economy, in the form of capital ownership, that drives the support of individuals. In particular, in highly societies ruled by a capital-rich dictator endowed with the power to tax and appropriate at will, the elites support dictatorial policies that generate higher growth rates than the ones obtained under democracy. Such support arises despite the total absence of checks and balances on the dictator. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 160 (2 UL)
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See detailUnfavorable Land Endowment, Cooperation, and Reversal of Fortune
Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2012)

This research advances the hypothesis that reversal of fortunes in the process of economic develop- ment can be traced to the effect of natural land productivity on the desirable level of cooperation in ... [more ▼]

This research advances the hypothesis that reversal of fortunes in the process of economic develop- ment can be traced to the effect of natural land productivity on the desirable level of cooperation in the agricultural sector. In early stages of development, unfavorable land endowment enhanced the economic incentive for cooperation in the creation of agricultural infrastructure that could mitigate the adverse effect of the natural environment. Nevertheless, despite the beneficial effects of cooperation on the intensive margin of agriculture, low land productivity countries lagged behind during the agricultural stage of development. However, as cooperation, and its persistent effect on social capital, have become increasingly important in the process of industrialization, the transition from agriculture to industry among unfavorable land endowment economies was expedited, permitting those economies that lagged behind in the agricultural stage of development, to overtake the high land productivity economies in the industrial stage of development. Exploiting exogenous sources of variations in land productivity across countries the research further explores the testable predictions of the theory. It establishes that: (i) reversal of fortunes in the process of development can be traced to variation in natural land productivity across countries. Economies characterized by favorable land endowment dominated the world economy in the agricultural stage of development but were overtaken in the process of industrialization; (ii) lower level of land productivity in the past is associated with higher levels of contemporary social capital; (iii) cooperation, as reflected by agricultural infrastructure, emerged primarily in places were land was not highly productive and collective action could have diminished the adverse effects of the environment and enhance agricultural output. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (7 UL)
See detailThe Behavior of the Saving Rate in the Neoclassical Optimal Growth Model
Litina, Anastasia UL; Palivos, Theodore

E-print/Working paper (2011)

This paper characterizes analytically the saving rate in the Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans model with a general production function when there exists both exogenous and endogenous growth. It points out conditions ... [more ▼]

This paper characterizes analytically the saving rate in the Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans model with a general production function when there exists both exogenous and endogenous growth. It points out conditions involving the share of capital and the elasticities of factor and intertemporal substitution under which the saving rate path to its steady-state value exhibits overshooting, undershooting, or is monotonic. Simulations illustrate these interesting dynamics. The paper also identifies the general class of production functions that render the saving rate constant along the entire transition path and hence make the Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans model isomorphic to that of Solow-Swan. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (4 UL)
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See detailCorruption, Tax Evasion and Social Values
Litina, Anastasia UL; Palivos, Theodore

E-print/Working paper (2011)

We provide empirical support and a theoretical explanation for the vicious circle of political corruption and tax evasion in which countries often fall into. We address this issue in the context of a ... [more ▼]

We provide empirical support and a theoretical explanation for the vicious circle of political corruption and tax evasion in which countries often fall into. We address this issue in the context of a model with two distinct groups of agents: citizens and politicians. Citizens decide the fraction of their income for which they evade taxes. Politicians decide the fraction of the public budget that they peculate. We show that multiple self-fulfilling equilibria with different levels of corruption can emerge based on the existence of strategic complementarities, indicating that corruption may corrupt. Furthermore, we find that standard deterrence policies cannot eliminate multiplicity. Instead, policies that impose a strong moral cost on tax evaders and corrupt politicians can lead to a unique equilibrium. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (4 UL)
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See detailCorruption and Environmental Policy: An Alternative Perspective
Athanasios, Lapatinas; Sartzetakis, Eftichis; Litina, Anastasia UL

E-print/Working paper (2011)

Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (4 UL)
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See detailDo Inada conditions imply that production function must be asymptotically Cobb–Douglas? A comment
Litina, Anastasia UL; Palivos, Theodore

in Economics Letters (2008), 99

We correct an intermediate mistake in Barelli and Pessôa [Barelli P. and Pessôa S. de A., 2003, “Inada conditions imply that production function must be asymptotically Cobb–Douglas,” Economics Letters 81 ... [more ▼]

We correct an intermediate mistake in Barelli and Pessôa [Barelli P. and Pessôa S. de A., 2003, “Inada conditions imply that production function must be asymptotically Cobb–Douglas,” Economics Letters 81, 361–363] and show that the main result is still valid. We also show that Barelli and Pessôa wrongly identified the class of functions with elasticity of substitution asymptotically equal to one as the Cobb–Douglas class. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (4 UL)