References of "Leglu, Catherine 50036634"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detail'A New Medea' in late medieval French narratives
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Simon, Anne; Bartel, Heike (Eds.) Unbinding Medea : Interdisciplinary approaches to a classical myth from Antiquity to the 21st century (2010)

Within a themed volume dedicated to the reception and adaptation of the story of Medea in many media and genres, this chapter presents texts and images of the 15th century that point to a tendency to ... [more ▼]

Within a themed volume dedicated to the reception and adaptation of the story of Medea in many media and genres, this chapter presents texts and images of the 15th century that point to a tendency to interpret Medea as a tragic heroine rather than a monstrous mother. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 UL)
See detailMultilingualism and Mother Tongue in Medieval French, Occitan and Catalan Narratives
Leglu, Catherine UL

Book published by Pennsylvania State University Press - 1st ed. (2010)

This monograph examines the gap between multilingualism and the idea of a mother tongue in a series of narrative texts of the 13th to the 15th centuries. The texts include hybrid idioms mixing literary ... [more ▼]

This monograph examines the gap between multilingualism and the idea of a mother tongue in a series of narrative texts of the 13th to the 15th centuries. The texts include hybrid idioms mixing literary languages (Occitan, Catalan, French and Veneto) and genres (prose, verse and prosimetrum). A significant number of these narratives tell the tale now known as 'Sleeping Beauty' and address gendered questions of consent and autonomy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRebuilding the tower of Babel in Girart de Roussillon
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Ailes, Marianne; Saux, Francoise Le; Lawrence, Anne (Eds.) Medieval historical discourses: essays in honour of Professor Peter S. Noble (2008)

An exploration of how languages are treated in an epic poem that survives in hybrid blends of two vernaculars (French and Occitan).

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLanguages in conflict in Toulouse: las leys d'amors
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Modern Language Review (2008), 103(2), 383--396

The 'Leys d'Amors' (Laws of Love) is a work produced by the newly-founded Consistory of the city of Toulouse to teach correct Occitan poetry to those who wished to enter their annual competition, the ... [more ▼]

The 'Leys d'Amors' (Laws of Love) is a work produced by the newly-founded Consistory of the city of Toulouse to teach correct Occitan poetry to those who wished to enter their annual competition, the 'Jocs florals' (Jeux Floraux). The work of the Consistory was defined as an attempt to maintain a fading lyric tradition in a language that was changing. It is argued that the 'Leys d'Amors' betray a perception of the Occitan language as both familiar and foreign, in part through the rhetorical term 'allebolus', which refers to a 'strange' or somehow foreign term. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (0 UL)
See detailThe erotics of consolation: desire and distance in the late middle ages
Leglu, Catherine UL; Milner, Stephen

Book published by Palgrave Macmillan (2008)

A themed volume of essays on the varied ways in which medieval literature of the later Middle Ages engaged with discourses of love and loss, mourning and consolation from Classical and Christian ... [more ▼]

A themed volume of essays on the varied ways in which medieval literature of the later Middle Ages engaged with discourses of love and loss, mourning and consolation from Classical and Christian traditions, notably Boethius. The texts studied are in English, Italian, German and French literature. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaternal consolatio in Antoine de La Sale's reconfort de Madame de Fresne
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Leglu, Catherine; Milner, Stephen (Eds.) The erotics of consolation: desire and distance in the late middle ages (2008)

One of the last writings attributed to Antoine de La Sale is a diptych of two short tales designed to console a bereaved mother by providing her with two examples of women in comparable situations. This ... [more ▼]

One of the last writings attributed to Antoine de La Sale is a diptych of two short tales designed to console a bereaved mother by providing her with two examples of women in comparable situations. This chapter analyses one of the two tales, which is presented as an eye-witness report by La Sale and which focuses on the Portuguese court, thus inviting the reader to see it as a memoir also intended for the duchess of Burgundy, Isabella of Portugal. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailBetween hell and a fiery mountain: Antoine de La Sale's ascent of Vulcano
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Studies in Travel Writing (2007), 11(2), 109--126

Antoine de la Sale's texts contain short fragments of allegedly autobiographical memoir. This article examines his account of climbing an active volcano on Lipari and suggests a possible intertext with ... [more ▼]

Antoine de la Sale's texts contain short fragments of allegedly autobiographical memoir. This article examines his account of climbing an active volcano on Lipari and suggests a possible intertext with Petrarch's description of his ascent of Mont Ventoux. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNourishing lineage in Coudrette's Roman de Mélusine ou Histoire de Lusignan (1401)
Leglu, Catherine UL

in McNeill, I.; Stephens, B. (Eds.) Transmissions: essays in French literature, thought and cinema (2007)

An exploration of what Melusine, a supernatural and hybrid mother, transmits to her many sons, focusing on late-medieval texts that discuss maternal breastfeeding.

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
See detailL'art roman et la poésie occitane: une question de traduction
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Goustine, L. De (Ed.) Le Troubadour Marcabru et ses contemporains (2007)

This article suggests that the troubadour Marcabru's poetry has much in common with Romanesque art of the regions associated with his poems.

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlace and movement in the old French Chanson de Toile
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Parergon (2007), 24(1), 21--39

Before the thirteenth century, Medieval theories of movement and of place and space depended on Latin translations of Greek sources. This article explores the treatment of stasis, place, and movement in ... [more ▼]

Before the thirteenth century, Medieval theories of movement and of place and space depended on Latin translations of Greek sources. This article explores the treatment of stasis, place, and movement in the corpus of 'chansons de toile', songs which typically depict an enclosed young woman's dreams of escape. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (1 UL)
See detailSimone de Beauvoir, Les Bouches inutiles, edition with introduction
Leglu, Catherine UL

Book published by Duckworth (2001)

Intended for students, an edition with introduction to Simone de Beauvoir's only produced play of 1945, which anticipates many of the key ideas of Le Deuxieme Sexe. Set in the late-medieval Low Countries ... [more ▼]

Intended for students, an edition with introduction to Simone de Beauvoir's only produced play of 1945, which anticipates many of the key ideas of Le Deuxieme Sexe. Set in the late-medieval Low Countries, the play depicts a city forced to expel its non-fighting population : the women, children and the elderly. it explores inequality, and who is valued within a society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDid women perform satirical poetry? Trobairitz and Soldadeiras in Medieval Occitan poetry
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Forum for Modern Language Studies (2001), 37(1), 15-25

Women poets (trobairitz) are named as authors of satirical poems of the 12th-13th centuries. It is not known if they were accepted culturally as performers. This chapter suggests that women performers are ... [more ▼]

Women poets (trobairitz) are named as authors of satirical poems of the 12th-13th centuries. It is not known if they were accepted culturally as performers. This chapter suggests that women performers are received in culturally-determined ways that can make it difficult to view their work solely as subsersive. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (0 UL)
See detailBetween Sequence and Sirventes : Aspects of Parody in Troubadour Lyric
Leglu, Catherine UL

Book published by MHRA (2000)

This monograph, based on part of a doctoral thesis, is an enquiry into the relationship between troubadour poetry of the 12th to 13th centuries and religious chant, specifically the Aquitainian corpus ... [more ▼]

This monograph, based on part of a doctoral thesis, is an enquiry into the relationship between troubadour poetry of the 12th to 13th centuries and religious chant, specifically the Aquitainian corpus. The study assesses the extent to which these rewritten poems could have been received as parodies, with close attention to metre, rhyme, and to the construction of the troubadour's satirical or moralising persona. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA reading of Troubadour insult songs: the Comunals cycle
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Reading Medieval Studies (1996), XXII

An analysis of a cycle of aggressive songs by troubadours.

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)