References of "Lallemand, Carine 50009322"
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See detailDISCOV: Encouraging a Healthy Active Lifestyle through the Design of Interactive Environments.
van Renswouw, Loes; Verhoef, Jasmijn; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

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See detailRaya: A Tangible Sports Buddy Reminding Oneself of the Commitment to Exercise
Menheere, Daphne; de Haan, Alynne; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

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See detailSupporting bariatric surgery patients in their aftercare journey: a playful technological intervention “Truth-or-Dare?"
Driesse, Emma; Verburg, Pepijn; Jansen, Jos-Marien et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Background The amount of people coping with obesity keeps on increasing. While the physical comorbidities are clearly visible, mental issues such as a low self-image are just as damaging. Bariatric ... [more ▼]

Background The amount of people coping with obesity keeps on increasing. While the physical comorbidities are clearly visible, mental issues such as a low self-image are just as damaging. Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment with long-term results [2, 3]. Its effectiveness is however often expressed in postoperative weight loss, leaving the impact on psychological health aside [3]. Methods To support bariatric patients in the aftercare pathway, we designed Truth-or-Dare. Combining a physical artefact and a mobile app, Truth-or-Dare is a playful way to track patients' mental state, using challenges to help them to establish a better self-image and a physical exercise routine. The frame attracts attention by dropping magnetic wooden blocks, indicating it is time to play! The app displays a personalized exercise or reflection challenge. By placing the block back on one side of the frame the choice is made: truth or dare? The Truth-or-Dare frame and app have been used by a former bariatric patient for two weeks. Every 6-12 hours a block fell out of the frame. We conducted two semistructured interviews, the first focused on the experience and initial thoughts about the product, the second informed by the data gathered. During the deployment, we also implemented a feedback loop to collect participants’ experiences with the challenges, allowing to understand which strategy was the most effective for a patient and to iterate on them. Findings The challenges were positively perceived by the participant and helped her to become more aware of her behavior and mindset. While she enjoyed taking her time to perform each challenge, she felt pressed and rushed by the too short interval between challenges. She often rated the challenges as unpleasant, complicated or annoying, yet motivating. If a challenge is annoying, it does not mean it is not motivating. “If I would not want challenges like that, I would ignore my problems.” We observed a pattern of switching between truth and dare challenges, mainly triggered by the physical properties of the board. Discussion Playful Truth-or-Dare challenges implemented in a physical artefact and a related app are a new intervention approach for mental wellbeing after bariatric surgery. It shows potential in raising awareness amongst patients around their behaviors and motivating them throughout their journey. As the product is placed in a shared environment, family members are encouraged to join, which has a positive influence on both the patient and partner [1]. The design of the physical product uses friction as a motivational mechanism: (a) a block on the ground calls for action. Will the patient remove it without performing a challenge or engage with the game? (b) placing the block back, one can choose Truth or Dare. Yet, the board is designed to prevent one type of challenge to be chosen too often. These moments of friction act as triggers to step outside the comfort zone. Further research is necessary to refine the challenges, or even personalize them, and to investigate the longterm effect of Truth-or-Dare on patients’ mental wellbeing and self-image. [less ▲]

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See detailSensation: Sonifying the Urban Running Experience
Van Renswouw, L.; Neerhof, J.; Vos, S. et al

in Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (2021, May)

Following the need to promote physical activity as a part of a healthy lifestyle, in this study we focus on encouraging more physical activity by improving the experience, with running as an example of a ... [more ▼]

Following the need to promote physical activity as a part of a healthy lifestyle, in this study we focus on encouraging more physical activity by improving the experience, with running as an example of a popular outdoor activity. Running in nature is often described as more pleasant and relaxing than running in the city, yet in urban environments it is difficult to integrate true nature in one's running route. To bridge this gap we designed Sensation, a sonified running track that provides sensations of nature using audio feedback. Sensation senses the footsteps of runners and produces synced sounds of footsteps in several nature environments to augment the urban landscape. This way, Sensation aims to enhance the environmental factors that contribute to the positive feelings people experience during a run. We report on insights gathered during our Research-through-Design process, as well as a preliminary user test of this sonified running track. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailCrafting On-Skin Interfaces: An Embodied Prototyping Journey
Restrepo-Villamizar, J.; Vos, S.; Verhagen, E. et al

in DIS 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference: Nowhere and Everywhere (2021, May)

This pictorial presents a design exploration of On-Skin Interfaces for recreational running. By integrating principles of interaction design, art and psychology, we explore the design of unconventional ... [more ▼]

This pictorial presents a design exploration of On-Skin Interfaces for recreational running. By integrating principles of interaction design, art and psychology, we explore the design of unconventional interfaces that facilitate the intuitive understanding of biofeedback and physiological-related information. We explored how principles from agency and bodily ownership can be applied in the design of sport- related wearables. Through our embodied prototyping journey, we gained insights on the implications of using the skin as an interactive design material. We focused on diverse materiality explorations to uncover and highlight the possibilities and challenges of materializing both functional and appealing On-Skin Interfaces. We synthesize and refl on our theoretical and practical explorations and deliver actionable insights for this growing fi of bodily and unconventional interfaces. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailOffice Agents: Personal Office Vitality Sensors with Intent
Stamhuis, Sjoerd; Brombacher, Hans; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what ... [more ▼]

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what they would find meaningful to follow the recommendations on healthy work conditions and behavior, while productivity is the priority. The Office Agents are a set of artefacts placed on the employee’s desk, which capture data about the office environment. Air quality, sound level, light exposure, productivity, and physical activity level are measured to provide office workers with feedback on the ‘best’ working conditions. Using speculative design and Objects with Intent, the employee engages in a negotiation with the Office Agents based on the office ecosystem. Through this project and interactivity session, we open a debate on the use of sensors in office environments and the stakes around office vitality from the viewpoint of the employees. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the Design Space of InterActive Urban Environments: Triggering physical activity through embedded technology
Van Renswouw, L.; Vos, S.; Van Wesemael, P. et al

in DIS 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference: Nowhere and Everywhere (2021)

Promoting healthy lifestyles is an essential endeavor for public health. The design of active urban environments can be an effective medium to nudge people into moving. With technology increasingly ... [more ▼]

Promoting healthy lifestyles is an essential endeavor for public health. The design of active urban environments can be an effective medium to nudge people into moving. With technology increasingly integrated into our daily lives, designers have access to more data than ever. In this pictorial, we explore the design space of interActive environments (contraction of ginteractive' and gactive'); places designed to increase the physical activity of users or passers-by through the use of interactive technology. Through sketches, a benchmark of existing concepts and an analysis of designed artefacts, we map the different intervention levels, interaction modalities, behavior change strategies and technological opportunities to design such interActive environments. With this work, we invite the community to consider how digital technology can help understand and shape human behavior in urban environments, and provide inspiration to designers and practitioners. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailLaina: Dynamic Data Physicalization for Slow Exercising Feedback
Menheere, Daphne; Van Hartingsveldt, Evianne; Birkebæk, Mads et al

in DIS '21: Designing Interactive Systems Conference 2021 (2021)

The increased popularity of recreational sports, like running, led to the development of numerous technologies supporting people in their training. However, in their current form and interaction, these ... [more ▼]

The increased popularity of recreational sports, like running, led to the development of numerous technologies supporting people in their training. However, in their current form and interaction, these take a rather standardized approach focusing on quantified data tracking displayed through screens or audio. In this paper, we explore how dynamic data physicalization through a shape-changing interface can open the design space of exercise feedback. Relying on an expert study on the aesthetics of interaction (N=23), we designed Laina, a shape-changing art piece presenting physicalized running data through a slow feedback mechanism. We deployed Laina at 3 participant's home, during a series of 3-weeks field studies. Results show that Laina allows for deep reflection, anticipation and exploration of running behavior. The aim of our paper is to provide insights on the use of slow feedback mechanisms for exercise-related products, through the design of a dynamic data physicalization artefact. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailRaya: A Tangible Exercise Buddy Reminding Oneself of the Commitment to Exercise
Menheere, Daphne; de Haan, Alynne; Vos, Steven et al

in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (2021)

Although many people have a positive intention to be more active, a key challenge remains to turn this intention into action. Social support as a motivational strategy can increase adherence in exercise ... [more ▼]

Although many people have a positive intention to be more active, a key challenge remains to turn this intention into action. Social support as a motivational strategy can increase adherence in exercise and can be provided by relational agents as a substitute for human coaches. We first conducted an exploratory two-week user study, to explore how emotional design and tangible interaction influences experience and motivation to exercise. We then designed a propositional research object Raya, a tangible exercise buddy that helps one to realize their workout by reminding them of their goals and self-commitment. We invite designers to bridge the gap in the design space of sport-related technologies by designing tangible artefacts embedding supportive and qualitative aesthetics of interaction rather than focusing on performance. © 2021, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Hubs: Design Insights for Walking Meeting Technology
Damen, Ida; Vos, Steven; Lallemand, Carine UL

in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (2021), 12935 LNCS

As an active form of meeting, walking meetings can be beneficial for office workers who often have a sedentary work routine. Despite their substantial benefits in terms of health, social interactions, and ... [more ▼]

As an active form of meeting, walking meetings can be beneficial for office workers who often have a sedentary work routine. Despite their substantial benefits in terms of health, social interactions, and creativity, walking meetings are not yet widely adopted. Some key barriers limiting their social acceptance and wider adoption, for instance, the difficulty to present files or take notes, might be addressed by technology. Using the Hubs - a network of stand-up meeting stations - as a design exemplar, we conducted a scenario-based survey (N = 186) to provide insights into how technological solutions can support the practice of walking meetings. Focusing on the size of the group and type of meetings, we identify scenarios of use and discuss design implications for the development of future technologies and service design components to support walking meetings. © 2021, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing. [less ▲]

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See detailDefining the Pre-Examination Experience of MRI patients through Affective Interaction.
van Weert, Katja; Chen, Tianyi; Verburg, Pepijn et al

Poster (2021)

For many patients, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) experiences are uncomfortable and associated with high levels of anxiety and stress. Such negative experiences may interfere with image quality and ... [more ▼]

For many patients, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) experiences are uncomfortable and associated with high levels of anxiety and stress. Such negative experiences may interfere with image quality and increase examination time. It is therefore necessary to understand the mental states of the patients prior to the examination in order to provide stress-relieving measures. Studies exploring MRI-related anxiety and interventions to alleviate it have typically relied on self-reported data (e.g. STAI-6 questionnaire) or psychophysiological measures [1], usually in the waiting room. One could however benefit from an alternative measurement approach to overcome the limitations of current methods. The purpose of our study is to develop a tool for measuring mental states in the context of MRI experiences and explore the suitability of various sensors to detect anxiety. [less ▲]

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See detailCasual Leisure in Rich-Prospect: Advancing Visual Information Behavior for Digital Museum Collections
Morse, Christopher UL; Niess, Jasmin; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in Journal on Computing and Cultural Heritage (2021), 14(3),

As digital cultural collections become increasingly sophisticated in their scope and functionality, there is a need to build an in-depth understanding concerning the information behaviors of users in this ... [more ▼]

As digital cultural collections become increasingly sophisticated in their scope and functionality, there is a need to build an in-depth understanding concerning the information behaviors of users in this new domain. Research has demonstrated that many digital museum visitors are engaged in casual leisure during exploration of a collection, suggesting that they do not have an inherent information goal but rather seek new experiences or learning opportunities based on personal curiosity and moments of discovery. Consequently, understanding how to translate casual leisure contexts into meaningful interaction design may play a critical role in designing engaging digital collections. Our study reports on the user experience of a largely unexplored user interface design framework called rich-prospect, which was originally developed to enhance browsing and discovery for complex visual collections. We performed a mixed-method, within-subjects study (N=30) that simulated a casual leisure approach to information browsing and retrieval across three different rich-prospect interfaces for digital cultural heritage. Our results show that rich-prospect scores well in the hedonic facets of its user experience, whereas pragmatic aspects have room for improvement. Additionally, through our qualitative analysis of participant feedback, we derived salient themes relating to the exploratory browsing experience. We conclude with a series of design implications to better connect interactive elements with casual leisure contexts for digital cultural collections. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailAesthetic of Friction for Exercising Motivation: A Prototyping Journey
De Haan, A.; Menheere, D.; Vos, S. et al

in DIS 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference: Nowhere and Everywhere (2021)

Despite an intention to exercise, it remains a challenge for many people to establish a workout routine over a period of time. Amongst identified barriers and enablers to exercise, getting dressed for a ... [more ▼]

Despite an intention to exercise, it remains a challenge for many people to establish a workout routine over a period of time. Amongst identified barriers and enablers to exercise, getting dressed for a workout is considered as one of the tipping points of actually going. Implementing the Aesthetic of Friction in this specific context, could imply the right course of action for the user, while it also allows freedom and encourages meaning-making. In this Research-through-Design project, we designed an interactive shrinking hanger, that implements these key principles, to encourage exercise motivation. We followed an iterative process focusing on the aesthetics of the interaction to find out how a careful consideration of the look and feel of an interactive artefact influences the acceptance of the implemented friction. We document the design process of this aesthetics of friction exemplar, and reflect on how to implement friction in design. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailVirtual Masterpieces: Innovation through Public Co-creation for Digital Museum Collections
Morse, Christopher UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Wieneke, Lars UL et al

in International Journal of the Inclusive Museum (2021), 15(1), 65-83

In this study, we describe the results of a series of co-creation workshops in museums with the goal of designing future digital cultural collections. Ranging from exhibition teasers to comprehensive ... [more ▼]

In this study, we describe the results of a series of co-creation workshops in museums with the goal of designing future digital cultural collections. Ranging from exhibition teasers to comprehensive virtual galleries, digital collections are an increasingly prominent feature of many museum websites but remain a largely unexplored facet of the visitor experience. Building on research in museum experience design, which suggests that involving the public in the development of on-site museum spaces and technologies supports better engagement, we investigated how this translates into digital-only contexts. We invited members of the public (N = 12) to the Luxembourg National Museum of History and Art for a series of design jams to investigate how non-experts envision the future of digital interactivity with museums through a series of ideation and rapid prototyping activities. Our analysis of the workshops and resulting prototypes reveals the design space of digital collections across three continuums of experience: individual/social, creation/consumption, and complementary/standalone. We conclude with design implications, namely how museum professionals can apply these dimensions to the design and implementation of digital collections. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Office Jungle: Exploring Unusual Ways of Working through Bodily Experimentations
Damen, I.; Nieuweboer, I.; Brombacher, H. et al

in DIS 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference: Nowhere and Everywhere (2021)

Modern office environments foster sitting, a major public health risk, with physical inactivity being the fourth cause of death worldwide. This provocative pictorial presents the design explorations and ... [more ▼]

Modern office environments foster sitting, a major public health risk, with physical inactivity being the fourth cause of death worldwide. This provocative pictorial presents the design explorations and bodily experimentations culminating in The Office Jungle, a critical and speculative redesign of the office environment that encourages physical activity by embracing wildness. The Office Jungle is a design exemplar of a "wild"office space presented as a suspended geodesic structure. It is built to experienc e how our office environment and our behaviour at work affect each other. We advocate that bringing wildness into office spaces will create more durable office environments that foster movement. With this pictorial, we aim to spark discussion amongst designers to think in new ways and to consider new opportunities to design for workplaces that integrate physical activity with work. © 2021 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimenter Effects in Children Using the Smileyometer Scale
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 19)

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these ... [more ▼]

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these challenges is related to the validity and reliability of user experience measurement tools. Scale designs, like the Smileyometer, have been proven to contain biases such as the tendency for children to rate almost every technology as great. This explorative paper discusses a possible effect of two experimenter styles on the distribution of 6-8 years old pupils' ratings (N= 73) to the Smileyometer. We administered the scale before and after a tablet-based assessment in two schools. Experimenter 1 employed a child-directed speech compared to a monotone speech of Experimenter 2. While brilliant (5 out of 5) was the most frequent answer option in all conditions, the mean scores were higher and associated with a lower variability across both conditions for Experimenter 2. We discuss a possible experimenter effect in the Smileyometer and implications for evaluating children’s user experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailHow do pupils experience Technology-Based Assessments? Implications for methodological approaches to measuring the User Experience based on two case studies in France and Luxembourg
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 12)

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at ... [more ▼]

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at their best (i.a. independent of individual differences in computer literacy), we must ensure reliable and valid data collection. By reducing Human-Computer Interaction issues, we provide the best possible assessment conditions and user experience (UX) with the TBA and reduce educational inequalities. Good UX is thus a prerequisite for better data validity. Building on a recent case study, we investigated how pupils perform TBAs in real-life settings. We addressed the context-dependent factors resulting from the observations that ultimately influence the UX. The first case study was conducted with pupils age 6 to 7 in three elementary schools in France (n=61) in collaboration with la direction de l’évaluation, de la prospective et de la performance (DEPP). The second case study was done with pupils age 12 to 16 in four secondary schools in Luxembourg (n=104) in collaboration with the Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET). This exploratory study focused on the collection of various qualitative datasets to identify factors that influence the interaction with the TBA. We also discuss the importance of teachers’ moderation style and mere system-related characteristics, such as audio protocols of the assessment data. This study contribution comprises design recommendations and implications for methodological approaches to measuring pupils’ user experience during TBAs. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Framework of Security-Enhancing Friction: How UX Can Help Users Behave More Securely
Distler, Verena UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in New Security Paradigms Workshop (2020, October 26)

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by ... [more ▼]

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by integrating the concept of user experience (UX) into empirical usable privacy and security studies that attempt to change risktaking behavior. UX enables us to study the complex interplay between user-related, system-related and contextual factors and provides insights into the experiential aspects underlying behavior change, including negative experiences. We first compare and contrast existing security-enhancing interventions (e.g., nudges, warnings, fear appeals) through the lens of friction. We then build on these insights to argue that it can be desirable to design for moments of negative UX in security-critical situations. For this purpose, we introduce the novel concept of security-enhancing friction, friction that effectively reduces the occurrence of risk-taking behavior and ensures that the overall UX (after use) is not compromised. We illustrate how security-enhancing friction provides an actionable way to systematically integrate the concept of UX into empirical usable privacy and security studies for meeting both the objectives of secure behavior and of overall acceptable experience. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring the Contextual Dimension of User Experience: Development of the User Experience Context Scale (UXCS)
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society (2020, October)

The context of use has been highlighted for a long time as being a key factor impacting User Experience (UX). Yet current UX evaluation tools, especially questionnaires, rarely encompass an explicit ... [more ▼]

The context of use has been highlighted for a long time as being a key factor impacting User Experience (UX). Yet current UX evaluation tools, especially questionnaires, rarely encompass an explicit investigation of the context. With the ever-growing trend for mobile products and ubiquitous computing, the absence of a dedicated measurement tool becomes critical. Based on a review of relevant literature and a fine-grained categorization of contextual factors, we developed the UX Context Scale (UXCS), a 30-items instrument allowing for a measure of context properties, as perceived by the user. We report on the development of the scale and present a first validation study (N = 137). A principal component analysis on the subjective items reveals a 6-components structure: Physical Context, Social Context, Internal Context, Perceived Resources, Task Context, and Temporal Context. Reliability of each subscale is high and further analyses confirm the relevance of this tool for UX evaluation. [less ▲]

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