References of "Kreis, Stephanie 50002134"
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See detailComparison of a healthy miRNome with melanoma patient miRNomes: are microRNAs suitable serum biomarkers for cancer?
Margue, Christiane UL; Reinsbach, Susanne UL; Philippidou, Demetra UL et al

in Oncotarget (2015), 6(14), 12110-27

MiRNAs are increasingly recognized as biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancers where they are profiled from tumor tissue (intracellular miRNAs) or serum/plasma samples (extracellular miRNAs). To improve ... [more ▼]

MiRNAs are increasingly recognized as biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancers where they are profiled from tumor tissue (intracellular miRNAs) or serum/plasma samples (extracellular miRNAs). To improve detection of reliable biomarkers from blood samples, we first compiled a healthy reference miRNome and established a well-controlled analysis pipeline allowing for standardized quantification of circulating miRNAs. Using whole miRNome and custom qPCR arrays, miRNA expression profiles were analyzed in 126 serum, whole blood and tissue samples of healthy volunteers and melanoma patients and in primary melanocyte and keratinocyte cell lines. We found characteristic signatures with excellent prognostic scores only in late stage but not in early stage melanoma patients. Upon comparison of melanoma tissue miRNomes with matching serum samples, several miRNAs were identified to be exclusively tissue-derived (miR-30b-5p, miR-374a-5p and others) while others had higher expression levels in serum (miR-3201 and miR-122-5p). Here we have compiled a healthy and widely applicable miRNome from serum samples and we provide strong evidence that levels of cell-free miRNAs only change significantly at later stages of melanoma progression, which has serious implications for miRNA biomarker studies in cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic change of host gastrointestinal microbiome and immune status in relation to mucosal barrier effects during chemotherapy and immune ablative intervention in humans
Kaysen, Anne UL; Heintz, Anna UL; Lebrun, Laura UL et al

Poster (2014, April)

The human gastrointestinal tract is colonized by communities of endogenous microbes, commonly referred to as the microbiome. Here, the microbiota are in close contact with the host intestinal mucosa and ... [more ▼]

The human gastrointestinal tract is colonized by communities of endogenous microbes, commonly referred to as the microbiome. Here, the microbiota are in close contact with the host intestinal mucosa and its innate and adaptive immune systems. The fact that certain stimuli induce an inflammatory response whereas others induce tolerance suggests, that the host immune system interacts with the microbiota and vice versa in different ways. However, the exact details of theses interactions remain largely unknown. It is known that cancer treatment can result in severe adverse effects like mucositis and in combination with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (Tx), in graft-versus host disease (GvHD). However, there is at present only sparse information available on the effects of chemotherapy on the intestinal microbiota and resulting changes in microbiome-immune system interactions. Almost no data exists on the effect of allogeneic stem cell Tx on the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota. In this project, we are studying the complex interactions between the host and the intestinal microbiota after chemotherapy with or without allogeneic Tx and the occurrence of severe adverse side effects such as mucositis and GvHD. Using a systems biology approach including metagenomics and RNAseq, fecal samples and blood plasma samples from patients undergoing these treatments for malignancies will be analysed to identify the composition of the gastrointestinal microbiome and bacterial small RNAs. The main research hypothesis is that there are quantitative and qualitative changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome following chemotherapy and allogeneic Tx which are linked to the immune status of the patients and possible treatment side-effects, in particular mucositis and GvHD. We aim to provide knowledge on how the host's intestinal mucosa and immune system influence the gastrointestinal microbiome and on the role and involvement of the gastrointestinal microbiota in development in mucositis and GvHD. Importantly, this could help in the formulation of measures to prevent mucositis and GvHD development. [less ▲]

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See detailNew Target Genes of MITF-Induced microRNA-211 Contribute to Melanoma Cell Invasion
Margue, Christiane UL; Philippidou, Demetra UL; Reinsbach, Susanne UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(9),

The non-coding microRNAs (miRNA) have tissue- and disease-specific expression patterns. They down-regulate target mRNAs, which likely impacts on most fundamental cellular processes. Differential ... [more ▼]

The non-coding microRNAs (miRNA) have tissue- and disease-specific expression patterns. They down-regulate target mRNAs, which likely impacts on most fundamental cellular processes. Differential expression patterns of miRNAs are currently being exploited for identification of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis, prediction of progression for melanoma and other cancers and as promising drug targets, since they can easily be inhibited or replaced in a given cellular context. Before successfully manipulating miRNAs in clinical settings, their precise expression levels, endogenous functions and thus their target genes have to be determined. MiR-211, a melanocyte lineage-specific small non-coding miRNA, is located in an intron of TRPM1, a target gene of the microphtalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). By transcriptionally up-regulating TRPM1, MITF, which is critical for both melanocyte differentiation and survival and for melanoma progression, indirectly drives the expression of miR-211. Expression of this miRNA is often reduced in melanoma samples. Here, we investigated functional roles of miR-211 by identifying and studying new target genes. We show that MITF-correlated miR-211 expression levels are mostly but not always reduced in a panel of 11 melanoma cell lines and in primary and metastatic melanoma compared to normal melanocytes and nevi, respectively. MiR-211 itself only marginally impacted on cell invasion and migration, while perturbation of some new miR-211 target genes, such as AP1S2, SOX11, IGFBP5, and SERINC3 significantly increased invasion. These results and the variable expression levels of miR-211 raise serious doubts on the value of miR-211 as a melanoma tumor-suppressing miRNA and/or as a biomarker for melanoma. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay of microRNAs, transcription factors and target genes: Linking dynamic expression changes to function
Nazarov, P. V. A; Reinsbach, Susanne UL; Muller, A. A et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2013), 41(5), 2817-2831

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitously expressed small non-coding RNAs that, in most cases, negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. miRNAs are involved in fine-tuning ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitously expressed small non-coding RNAs that, in most cases, negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. miRNAs are involved in fine-tuning fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation, cell death and cell cycle control and are believed to confer robustness to biological responses. Here, we investigated simultaneously the transcriptional changes of miRNA and mRNA expression levels over time after activation of the Janus kinase/Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak/STAT) pathway by interferon-c stimulation of melanoma cells. To examine global miRNA and mRNA expression patterns, time-series microarray data were analysed. We observed delayed responses of miRNAs (after 24-48 h) with respect to mRNAs (12-24 h) and identified biological functions involved at each step of the cellular response. Inference of the upstream regulators allowed for identification of transcriptional regulators involved in cellular reactions to interferon-c stimulation. Linking expression profiles of transcriptional regulators and miRNAs with their annotated functions, we demonstrate the dynamic interplay of miRNAs and upstream regulators with biological functions. Finally, our data revealed network motifs in the form of feed-forward loops involving transcriptional regulators, mRNAs and miRNAs. Additional information obtained from integrating time-series mRNA and miRNA data may represent an important step towards understanding the regulatory principles of gene expression. © The Author(s) 2013. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic regulation of microRNA expression following interferonγ- induced gene transcription
Reinsbach, Susanne UL; Nazarov, Petr V.; Philippidou, Demetra UL et al

in RNA Biology (2012), 9(7), 987-989

MicroRNAs are major players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Even small changes in miRNA levels may have profound consequences for the expression levels of target genes. Hence, miRNAs themselves ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs are major players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Even small changes in miRNA levels may have profound consequences for the expression levels of target genes. Hence, miRNAs themselves need to be tightly, albeit dynamically, regulated. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of miRNAs over a wide time range following stimulation of melanoma cells with interferonγ (IFNγ), which activates the transcription factor STAT1. By applying several bioinformatic and statistical software tools for visualization and identification of differentially expressed miRNAs derived from time-series microarray experiments, 8.9% of 1105 miRNAs appeared to be directly or indirectly regulated by STAT1. Focusing on distinct dynamic expression patterns, we found that the majority of robust miRNA expression changes occurred in the intermediate time range (24-48 h). Three miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-30a and miR-34a) had a delayed regulation occurring at 72 h while none showed significant expression changes at early time points between 30 min and 6 h. Expression patterns of individual miRNAs were altered gradually over time or abruptly increased or decreased between two time points. Furthermore, we observed coordinated dynamic transcription of most miRNA clusters while few were found to be regulated independently of their genetic cluster. Most interestingly, several "star" or passenger strand sequences were specifically regulated over time while their "guide" strands were not. © 2012 Landes Bioscience. [less ▲]

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See detailInterferon-γ-induced activation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) up-regulates the tumor suppressing microRNA-29 family in melanoma cells
Schmitt, Martina J.; Philippidou, Demetra UL; Reinsbach, Susanne UL et al

in Cell Communication and Signaling (2012), 10

Background: The type-II-cytokine IFN-γ is a pivotal player in innate immune responses but also assumes functions in controlling tumor cell growth by orchestrating cellular responses against neoplastic ... [more ▼]

Background: The type-II-cytokine IFN-γ is a pivotal player in innate immune responses but also assumes functions in controlling tumor cell growth by orchestrating cellular responses against neoplastic cells. The role of IFN-γ in melanoma is not fully understood: it is a well-known growth inhibitor of melanoma cells in vitro. On the other hand, IFN-γ may also facilitate melanoma progression. While interferon-regulated genes encoding proteins have been intensively studied since decades, the contribution of miRNAs to effects mediated by interferons is an emerging area of research.We recently described a distinct and dynamic regulation of a whole panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) after IFN-γ-stimulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the transcriptional regulation of miR-29 family members in detail, identify potential interesting target genes and thus further elucidate a potential signaling pathway IFN-γ → Jak→ P-STAT1 → miR-29 → miR-29 target genes and its implication for melanoma growth. Results: Here we show that IFN-γ induces STAT1-dependently a profound up-regulation of the miR-29 primary cluster pri-29a∼b-1 in melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, expression levels of pri-29a∼b-1 and mature miR-29a and miR-29b were elevated while the pri-29b-2∼c cluster was almost undetectable. We observed an inverse correlation between miR-29a/b expression and the proliferation rate of various melanoma cell lines. This finding could be corroborated in cells transfected with either miR-29 mimics or inhibitors. The IFN-γ-induced G1-arrest of melanoma cells involves down-regulation of CDK6, which we proved to be a direct target of miR-29 in these cells. Compared to nevi and normal skin, and metastatic melanoma samples, miR-29a and miR-29b levels were found strikingly elevated in certain patient samples derived from primary melanoma. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that the miR-29a/b1 cluster is to be included in the group of IFN- and STAT-regulated genes. The up-regulated miR-29 family members may act as effectors of cytokine signalling in melanoma and other cancer cells as well as in the immune system. © 2012 Schmitt et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailMiRNA-29: A microRNA family with tumor-suppressing and immune-modulating properties
Schmitt, Martina; Margue, Christiane UL; Behrmann, Iris UL et al

in Current Molecular Medicine (2012), 13(4), 572-585

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitously expressed small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. So far, over 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitously expressed small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. So far, over 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells and their diverse functions in normal cell homeostasis and many different diseases have been thoroughly investigated during the past decade. MiR-29, one of the most interesting miRNA families in humans to date, consists of three mature members miR-29a, miR-29b and miR-29c, which are encoded in two genetic clusters. Members of this family have been shown to be silenced or down-regulated in many different types of cancer and have subsequently been attributed predominantly tumor-suppressing properties, albeit exceptions have been described where miR-29s have tumor-promoting functions. MiR-29 targets expression of diverse proteins like collagens, transcription factors, methyltransferases and others, which may partake in abnormal migration, invasion or proliferation of cells and may favor development of cancer. Furthermore, members of the miR-29 family can be activated by interferon signaling, which suggests a role in the immune system and in host-pathogen interactions, especially in response to viral infections. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the genomic organization and regulation of the miR-29 family and we provide an overview of its implication in cancer suppression and promotion as well as in host immune responses. The numerous remarkable properties of these miRNAs and their often altered expression patterns might make the miR-29 family promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets for various diseases in future. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers. [less ▲]

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See detailIL-24: Physiological and supraphysiological effects on normal and malignant cells
Margue, Christiane UL; Kreis, Stephanie UL

in Current Medicinal Chemistry (2010), 17(29), 3318-3326

IL-24, previously known as melanoma differentiation antigen 7 (mda-7), is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines and is mainly produced by Th 2 cells and activated monocytes. Binding of IL-24 to either ... [more ▼]

IL-24, previously known as melanoma differentiation antigen 7 (mda-7), is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines and is mainly produced by Th 2 cells and activated monocytes. Binding of IL-24 to either of its two heterodimeric receptors IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2 triggers phosphorylation and consequently activation of STAT3 and/or STAT1 in target tissues such as lung, testis, ovary, keratinocytes and skin. There is accumulating evidence that skin represents a major target tissue for IL-24 and related cytokines such as IL-19, -20, and -22. To date, the physiological properties of IL-24 are incompletely understood but available data indicate that it affects epidermal functions by increasing proliferation of dermal cells, suggestive of a possible role in psoriasis. However, the initial interest in IL-24 did not arise from its physiological signaling properties through its cognate receptors but rather because this cytokine has been reported to efficiently kill cancer cells independent of receptor expression and Jak-STAT signaling. These potentially intriguing properties have led to the development of adenovirally expressed IL-24, which was reported to induce selective cancer cell death in many different malignancies by activation or deactivation of a continuously growing list of distinct signaling pathways without harming surrounding healthy cells. In the present review we critically revisit and discuss the potential of IL-24 to become a selective and cancer cell-specific oncolytic drug and put these tentative properties into context with recent data on the physiological properties of this cytokine. © 2010 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailSignatures of MicroRNAs and selected MicroRNA target genes in human melanoma
Philippidou, Demetra UL; Schmitt, Martina UL; Moser, Dirk et al

in Cancer Research (2010), 70(10), 4163-4173

Small noncoding microRNAs (miRNA) regulate the expression of target mRNAs by repressing their translation or orchestrating their sequence-specific degradation. In this study, we investigated miRNA and ... [more ▼]

Small noncoding microRNAs (miRNA) regulate the expression of target mRNAs by repressing their translation or orchestrating their sequence-specific degradation. In this study, we investigated miRNA and miRNA target gene expression patterns in melanoma to identify candidate biomarkers for early and progressive disease. Because data presently available on miRNA expression in melanoma are inconsistent thus far, we applied several different miRNA detection and profiling techniques on a panel of 10 cell lines and 20 patient samples representing nevi and primary or metastatic melanoma. Expression of selected miRNAs was inconsistent when comparing cell line-derived and patient-derived data. Moreover, as expected, some discrepancies were also detected when miRNA microarray data were correlated with qPCR-measured expression levels. Nevertheless, we identified miRNA-200c to be consistently downregulated in melanocytes, melanoma cell lines, and patient samples, whereas miRNA-205 and miRNA-23b were markedly reduced only in patient samples. In contrast, miR-146a and miR-155 were upregulated in all analyzed patients but none of the cell lines. Whole-genome microarrays were performed for analysis of selected melanoma cell lines to identify potential transcriptionally regulated miRNA target genes. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we identified a deregulated gene network centered around microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, a transcription factor known to play a key role in melanoma development. Our findings define miRNAs and miRNA target genes that offer candidate biomarkers in human melanoma. ©2010 AACR. [less ▲]

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See detailIL-24: a classic cytokine and/or a potential cure for cancer?
Kreis, Stephanie UL; Philippidou, Demetra UL; Margue, Christiane UL et al

in Journal of Cellular & Molecular Medicine (2008), 12(6A), 2505-2510

IL-24, a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines, is produced by monocytes and Th2 cells. Interestingly, immune cells do not appear to express specific IL-24 receptor chains (IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL ... [more ▼]

IL-24, a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines, is produced by monocytes and Th2 cells. Interestingly, immune cells do not appear to express specific IL-24 receptor chains (IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2), it is therefore unlikely that IL-24 has classical immune-modulating properties. Skin, on the other hand, seems to represent a major target tissue for IL-24 and related cytokines such as IL-19, -20, and -22. However, the initial interest in IL-24 did not arise from its physiological signalling properties through its cognate receptors but rather because of its tentative ability to selectively kill different cancer cells. In an attempt to further investigate the signalling events underlying the IL-24-induced cancer cell death, we found that melanoma cell lines did not react in the expected and previously described way. Using several different forms and delivery modes of IL-24, we were unable to detect any apoptosis-inducing properties of this cytokine in melanoma cells. In the present "Point of view" we will briefly summarise these findings and put them in context of published reports stating that IL-24 might be a long sought after treatment for several types of cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailCell density dependent increase of constitutive signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 activity in melanoma cells is mediated by Janus kinases
Kreis, Stephanie UL; Munz, George. A.; Haan, Serge UL et al

in Molecular Cancer Research (2008), 5(12), 1331-41

Signal transducers and activators of transcriptions (STAT) are key mediators of cytokine signaling. Moreover, these transcription factors play a crucial role in oncogenic signaling where inappropriate and ... [more ▼]

Signal transducers and activators of transcriptions (STAT) are key mediators of cytokine signaling. Moreover, these transcription factors play a crucial role in oncogenic signaling where inappropriate and sustained activation of STATs, especially STAT3, is a trait of many different cancers and their derived cell lines. Constitutively active STAT3 has been reported to prevent programmed cell death and enhance cell proliferation, whereas the disruption of STAT3 signaling can inhibit tumor growth. The physiologic activation of STAT3 by cytokines has been well established; however, little is known about altered, stimulation-independent STAT3 activation. Here, we show that, in most but not all melanoma cell lines, STAT3 phosphorylation increased substantially with cell density and that this STAT3 was able to bind to DNA and to activate transcription. Inhibitor studies showed that the cell density-dependent STAT3 activation relies on Janus kinases (JAK) rather than Src kinases. Using a specific JAK inhibitor, sustained STAT3 activation was completely abrogated in all tested melanoma lines, whereas inhibition of Src or mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase 1/2 had no effect on constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3 levels. Although STAT3 activation was completely blocked with JAK inhibitor I and to a lesser extent with the common JAK inhibitor AG490, only the latter compound markedly decreased proliferation and induced apoptosis. Taken together, variations in cell density can profoundly modify the extent of JAK-mediated persistent STAT3 phosphorylation; however, STAT3 activation was not sufficient to provide critical growth and survival signals in melanoma cell lines. [less ▲]

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See detailRecombinant interleukin-24 lacks apoptosis-inducing properties in melanoma cells
Kreis, Stephanie UL; Philippidou, Demetra UL; Margue, Christiane UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2007), 2(12), 1300

IL-24, also known as melanoma differentiation antigen 7 (mda-7), is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines and is mainly produced by Th(2) cells as well as by activated monocytes. Binding of IL-24 to ... [more ▼]

IL-24, also known as melanoma differentiation antigen 7 (mda-7), is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines and is mainly produced by Th(2) cells as well as by activated monocytes. Binding of IL-24 to either of its two possible heterodimeric receptors IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2 activates STAT3 and/or STAT1 in target tissues such as lung, testis, ovary, keratinocytes and skin. To date, the physiological properties of IL-24 are still not well understood but available data suggest that IL-24 affects epidermal functions by increasing proliferation of dermal cells. In stark contrast to its "normal" and physiological behaviour, IL-24 has been reported to selectively and efficiently kill a vast variety of cancer cells, especially melanoma cells, independent of receptor expression and Jak-STAT signalling. These intriguing properties have led to the development of adenovirally-expressed IL-24, which is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Using three different methods, we have analysed a large panel of melanoma cell lines with respect to IL-24 and IL-24 receptor expression and found that none of the investigated cell lines expressed sufficient amounts of functional receptor pairs and therefore did not react to IL-24 stimulation with Jak/STAT activation. Results for three cell lines contrasted with previous studies, which reported presence of IL-24 receptors and activation of STAT3 following IL-24 stimulation. Furthermore, evaluating four different sources and modes of IL-24 administration (commercial recombinant IL-24, bacterially expressed GST-IL-24 fusion protein, IL-24 produced from transfected Hek cells, transiently over-expressed IL-24) no induction or increase in cell death was detected when compared to appropriate control treatments. Thus, we conclude that the cytokine IL-24 itself has no cancer-specific apoptosis-inducing properties in melanoma cells. [less ▲]

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See detailJaks and cytokine receptors - an intimate relationship
Haan, Claude UL; Kreis, Stephanie UL; Margue, Christiane UL et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2006), 72(11), 1538-46

Most cytokine receptors lack intrinsic kinase activity and many of them signal via Janus kinases (Jaks). These tyrosine kinases are associated with cytokine receptor subunits, they become activated upon ... [more ▼]

Most cytokine receptors lack intrinsic kinase activity and many of them signal via Janus kinases (Jaks). These tyrosine kinases are associated with cytokine receptor subunits, they become activated upon receptor triggering and subsequently activate downstream signalling events, e.g. the phosphorylation of STAT transcription factors. The successful interplay between cytokines, their receptors and the connected Jaks not only determines signalling competence but is also vital for intracellular traffic, stability, and fate of the cognate receptors. Here, we will discuss underlying mechanisms as well as some structural features with a focus on Jak1 and two of the signal transducing receptor subunits of interleukin (IL)-6 type cytokines, gp130 and OSMR. Regions that are critically involved in Jak-binding have been identified for many cytokine receptor subunits. In most cases the membrane-proximal parts comprising the box1 and box2 regions within the receptor are involved in this association while, within Jaks, the N-terminal FERM domain, possibly together with the SH2-like domain, are pivotal for binding to the relevant receptors. The exclusive membrane localisation of Jaks depends on their ability to associate with cytokine receptors. For gp130 and Jak1, it was shown that the cytokine receptor/Jak complex can be regarded as a receptor tyrosine kinase since both molecules have the same diffusion dynamics and are virtually undissociable. Furthermore, Jaks take an active role in the regulation of the surface expression of at least some cytokine receptors, including the OSMR and this may provide a quality control mechanism ensuring that only signalling-competent receptors (i.e. those with an associated Jak) would be enriched at the cell surface. [less ▲]

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See detailThe intermediate filament protein vimentin binds specifically to a recombinant integrin α2/β1 cytoplasmic tail complex and co-localizes with native α2/β1 in endothelial cell focal adhesions
Kreis, Stephanie UL; Schönfeld, H.-J. B; Melchior, C. A et al

in Experimental Cell Research (2005), 305(1), 110-121

Integrin receptors are crucial players in cell adhesion and migration. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with their short α and β cytoplasmic tails will help to ... [more ▼]

Integrin receptors are crucial players in cell adhesion and migration. Identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with their short α and β cytoplasmic tails will help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which integrins mediate bi-directional signaling across the plasma membrane. Integrin α2β1 is a major collagen receptor but to date, only few proteins have been shown to interact with the α2 cytoplasmic tail or with the α2β1 complex. In order to identify novel binding partners of a α2β1cytoplasmic domain complex, we have generated recombinant GST-fusion proteins, incorporating the leucine zipper heterodimerization cassettes of Jun and Fos. To ascertain proper functionality of the recombinant proteins, interaction with natural binding partners was tested. GST-α2 and GST-Jun α2 bound His-tagged calreticulin while GST-β1 and GST-Fos β1 proteins bound talin. In screening assays for novel binding partners, the immobilized GST-Jun α2/GST-Fos β1 heterodimeric complex, but not the single subunits, interacted specifically with endothelial cell-derived vimentin. Vimentin, an abundant intermediate filament protein, has previously been shown to co-localize with αvβ3-positive focal contacts. Here, we provide evidence that this interaction also occurs with α2β1-enriched focal adhesions and we further show that this association is lost after prolonged adhesion of endothelial cells to collagen. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA fluorescence cell biology approach to map the second integrin-binding site of talin to a 130-amino acid sequence within the rod domain
Tremuth, Laurent A; Kreis, Stephanie UL; Melchior, Chantal et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(21), 22258-22266

The cytoskeletal protein talin, which provides a direct link between integrins and actin filaments, has been shown to contain two distinct binding sites for integrin β subunits. Here, we report the ... [more ▼]

The cytoskeletal protein talin, which provides a direct link between integrins and actin filaments, has been shown to contain two distinct binding sites for integrin β subunits. Here, we report the precise delimitation and a first functional analysis of the talin rod domain integrin-binding site. Partially overlapping cDNAs covering the entire human talin gene were transiently expressed as DsRed fusion proteins in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing α IIbβ 3, linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Two-color fluorescence analysis of the transfected cells, spread on fibrinogen, revealed distinct subcellular staining patterns including focal adhesion, actin filament, and granular labeling for different talin fragments. The rod domain fragment G (residues 1984-2344), devoid of any known actin- or vinculin-binding sites, colocalized with β 3-GFP in focal adhesions. Direct in vitro interaction of fragment G with native platelet integrin α IIbβ 3 or with the recombinant wild type, but not the Y747A mutant β 3 cytoplasmic tail, linked to glutathione S-transferase, was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance analysis and pull-down assays, respectively. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the in vivo relevance of this interaction by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between β 3-GFP and DsRed-talin fragment G. Further in vitro pull-down studies allowed us to map out the integrin-binding site within fragment G to a stretch of 130 residues (fragment J, residues 1984-2113) that also localized to focal adhesions. Finally, we show by a cell biology approach that this integrin- binding site within the talin rod domain is important for β 3-cytoskeletal interactions but does not participate in α IIbβ 3 activation. [less ▲]

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See detailPromoter characterization and genomic organization of the gene encoding integrin-linked kinase 1
Melchior, C. A; Kreis, Stephanie UL; Janji, B. B et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Gene Structure and Expression (2002), 1575(1-3), 117-122

Integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-1 is a 59-kDa serine-threonine protein kinase, which associates with the cytoplasmic domain of β1, β2 and β3 integrins and acts as a receptor proximal kinase regulating ... [more ▼]

Integrin-linked kinase (ILK)-1 is a 59-kDa serine-threonine protein kinase, which associates with the cytoplasmic domain of β1, β2 and β3 integrins and acts as a receptor proximal kinase regulating integrin-mediated signal transduction. We have recently identified an isoform of ILK (ILK-2), which is expressed, in a TGF-β1-dependent manner, in a highly invasive tumor cell line but not in normal adult tissues. In contrast, ILK-1 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and is up-regulated in various tumors independent of TGF-β1. Here, we report the structural organization and the promoter activity of the human ILK-1 gene, contained within a 8.8-kb genomic fragment cloned from a human BAC library. The mature protein is encoded by 13 exons. The last coding exon contains the entire 3′ UTR of the ILK-1 gene, which overlaps with the complementary 3′ UTR sequence of the TAF2H gene, a TATA box binding protein-associated factor. A major transcriptional initiation start site was found 138 bp upstream of exon 1 in close proximity to a consensus initiator element (Inr). The ILK gene is transcribed by a TATA-less and CAAT-less promoter with typical features of housekeeping genes. The promoter activity was characterized by a luciferase reporter assay and the minimal sequence conferring promoter activity was 349 bp in size and located immediately upstream of exon 1. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHeteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) pre-screening: An improved strategy for the rapid identification of inserts selected from phage-displayed peptide libraries
Fack, F.; Deroo, S.; Kreis, Stephanie UL et al

in Molecular Diversity (2000), 5(1), 7-12

Phage-displayed peptide libraries represent an efficient tool to isolate peptides that bind a given target molecule. After several selection rounds, generally a large pool of target binding phages is ... [more ▼]

Phage-displayed peptide libraries represent an efficient tool to isolate peptides that bind a given target molecule. After several selection rounds, generally a large pool of target binding phages is obtained. Conventional analysis of the selected phage population involves extensive sequencing of many clones, most of which can be identical. We have adapted the Heteroduplex Mobility Assay (HMA) for pre-screening of phage inserts that were amplified by direct colony PCR of ELISA-positive clones. This strategy allowed for the rapid and reproducible assignment of insert sequences to different 'heteroduplex migration groups'. Sequence analysis of only one representative of each HMA migration group then completes the characterisation of the binding phage population. In our model experiments, only 16% of HMA pre-screened clones required further sequence analysis. [less ▲]

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