References of "Krause, Roland 50002132"
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See detailDe Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies.
Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi UL; Barisic, Nina et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2017), 100(1), 179-

In the list of consortium members for the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project, member Dina Amrom’s name was misspelled as Amron. The authors regret the error.

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See detailEvaluation of Presumably Disease Causing SCN1A Variants in a Cohort of Common Epilepsy Syndromes
Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva; Dejanovic et al

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing ... [more ▼]

Objective The SCN1A gene, coding for the voltage-gated Na+ channel alpha subunit NaV1.1, is the clinically most relevant epilepsy gene. With the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are generating an ever-increasing catalogue of SCN1A variants. Variants are more likely to be classified as pathogenic if they have already been identified previously in a patient with epilepsy. Here, we critically re-evaluate the pathogenicity of this class of variants in a cohort of patients with common epilepsy syndromes and subsequently ask whether a significant fraction of benign variants have been misclassified as pathogenic. Methods We screened a discovery cohort of 448 patients with a broad range of common genetic epilepsies and 734 controls for previously reported SCN1A mutations that were assumed to be disease causing. We re-evaluated the evidence for pathogenicity of the identified variants using in silico predictions, segregation, original reports, available functional data and assessment of allele frequencies in healthy individuals as well as in a follow up cohort of 777 patients. Results and Interpretation We identified 8 known missense mutations, previously reported as pathogenic, in a total of 17 unrelated epilepsy patients (17/448; 3.80%). Our re-evaluation indicates that 7 out of these 8 variants (p.R27T; p.R28C; p.R542Q; p.R604H; p.T1250M; p.E1308D; p.R1928G; NP_001159435.1) are not pathogenic. Only the p.T1174S mutation may be considered as a genetic risk factor for epilepsy of small effect size based on the enrichment in patients (P = 6.60 x 10−4; OR = 0.32, fishers exact test), previous functional studies but incomplete penetrance. Thus, incorporation of previous studies in genetic counseling of SCN1A sequencing results is challenging and may produce incorrect conclusions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Human Phenotype Ontology in 2017
Köhler, Sebastian; Vasilevsky, Nicole A.; Engelstad, Mark et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2016)

Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components ... [more ▼]

Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the algorithms that operate on these. These components are being used for computational deep phenotyping and precision medicine as well as integration of clinical data into translational research. The HPO is being increasingly adopted as a standard for phenotypic abnormalities by diverse groups such as international rare disease organizations, registries, clinical labs, biomedical resources, and clinical software tools and will thereby contribute toward nascent efforts at global data exchange for identifying disease etiologies. This update article reviews the progress of the HPO project since the debut Nucleic Acids Research database article in 2014, including specific areas of expansion such as common (complex) disease, new algorithms for phenotype driven genomic discovery and diagnostics, integration of cross-species mapping efforts with the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, an improved quality control pipeline, and the addition of patient-friendly terminology. [less ▲]

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See detail70S-scanning initiation is a novel and frequent initiation mode of ribosomal translation in bacteria.
Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Wittek, Daniela; Gupta, Romi et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016), 113(9), 1180-9

According to the standard model of bacterial translation initiation, the small ribosomal 30S subunit binds to the initiation site of an mRNA with the help of three initiation factors (IF1-IF3). Here, we ... [more ▼]

According to the standard model of bacterial translation initiation, the small ribosomal 30S subunit binds to the initiation site of an mRNA with the help of three initiation factors (IF1-IF3). Here, we describe a novel type of initiation termed "70S-scanning initiation," where the 70S ribosome does not necessarily dissociate after translation of a cistron, but rather scans to the initiation site of the downstream cistron. We detailed the mechanism of 70S-scanning initiation by designing unique monocistronic and polycistronic mRNAs harboring translation reporters, and by reconstituting systems to characterize each distinct mode of initiation. Results show that 70S scanning is triggered by fMet-tRNA and does not require energy; the Shine-Dalgarno sequence is an essential recognition element of the initiation site. IF1 and IF3 requirements for the various initiation modes were assessed by the formation of productive initiation complexes leading to synthesis of active proteins. IF3 is essential and IF1 is highly stimulating for the 70S-scanning mode. The task of IF1 appears to be the prevention of untimely interference by ternary aminoacyl (aa)-tRNA*elongation factor thermo unstable (EF-Tu)*GTP complexes. Evidence indicates that at least 50% of bacterial initiation events use the 70S-scanning mode, underscoring the relative importance of this translation initiation mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailCrowdsourced estimation of cognitive decline and resilience in Alzheimer's disease
Allen, Genevera; Amoroso, Nicola; Anghel, Catalina et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2016), 12(6), 645-653

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See detailDe novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy
Syrbe, Steffen; Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Riesch, Erik et al

in Nature Genetics (2015), 47(4), 393-9

Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1–6. Using next ... [more ▼]

Epileptic encephalopathies are a phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe epilepsies accompanied by intellectual disability and other neurodevelopmental features1–6. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four different de novo mutations in KCNA2, encoding the potassium channel KV1.2, in six patients with epileptic encephalopathy (one mutation recurred three times independently). Four individuals presented with febrile and multiple afebrile, often focal seizure types, multifocal epileptiform discharges strongly activated by sleep, mild to moderate intellectual disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing neurons. [less ▲]

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See detailCHD2 myoclonic encephalopathy is frequently associated with self-induced seizures
Thomas, Rhys H.; Zhang, Lin Mei; Carvill, Gemma L. et al

in Neurology (2015), 84(9), 951-958

Objective: To delineate the phenotype of early childhood epileptic encephalopathy due to de novo mutations of CHD2, which encodes the chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2. Methods: We analyzed the ... [more ▼]

Objective: To delineate the phenotype of early childhood epileptic encephalopathy due to de novo mutations of CHD2, which encodes the chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2. Methods: We analyzed the medical history, MRI, and video-EEG recordings of 9 individuals with de novo CHD2 mutations and one with a de novo 15q26 deletion encompassing CHD2. Results: Seizures began at a mean of 26 months (12–42) with myoclonic seizures in all 10 cases. Seven exhibited exquisite clinical photosensitivity; 6 self-induced with the television. Absence seizures occurred in 9 patients including typical (4), atypical (2), and absence seizures with eyelid myoclonias (4). Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 9 of 10 cases with a mean onset of 5.8 years. Convulsive and nonconvulsive status epilepticus were later features (6/10, mean onset 9 years). Tonic (40%) and atonic (30%) seizures also occurred. In 3 cases, an unusual seizure type, the atonic-myoclonic-absence was captured on video. A phenotypic spectrum was identified with 7 cases having moderate to severe intellectual disability and refractory seizures including tonic attacks. Their mean age at onset was 23 months. Three cases had a later age at onset (34 months) with relative preservation of intellect and an initial response to antiepileptic medication. Conclusion: The phenotypic spectrum of CHD2 encephalopathy has distinctive features of myoclonic epilepsy, marked clinical photosensitivity, atonic-myoclonic-absence, and intellectual disability ranging from mild to severe. Recognition of this genetic entity will permit earlier diagnosis and enable the development of targeted therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe phenotypic spectrum of SCN8A encephalopathy
Larsen, Jan; Carvill, Gemma L.; Gardella, Elena et al

in Neurology (2015), 84(5), 480-489

Objective: SCN8A encodes the sodium channel voltage-gated α8-subunit (Nav1.6). SCN8A mutations have recently been associated with epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. We aimed to delineate the ... [more ▼]

Objective: SCN8A encodes the sodium channel voltage-gated α8-subunit (Nav1.6). SCN8A mutations have recently been associated with epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. We aimed to delineate the phenotype associated with SCN8A mutations. Methods: We used high-throughput sequence analysis of the SCN8A gene in 683 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies. In addition, we ascertained cases with SCN8A mutations from other centers. A detailed clinical history was obtained together with a review of EEG and imaging data. Results: Seventeen patients with de novo heterozygous mutations of SCN8A were studied. Seizure onset occurred at a mean age of 5 months (range: 1 day to 18 months); in general, seizures were not triggered by fever. Fifteen of 17 patients had multiple seizure types including focal, tonic, clonic, myoclonic and absence seizures, and epileptic spasms; seizures were refractory to antiepileptic therapy. Development was normal in 12 patients and slowed after seizure onset, often with regression; 5 patients had delayed development from birth. All patients developed intellectual disability, ranging from mild to severe. Motor manifestations were prominent including hypotonia, dystonia, hyperreflexia, and ataxia. EEG findings comprised moderate to severe background slowing with focal or multifocal epileptiform discharges. Conclusion: SCN8A encephalopathy presents in infancy with multiple seizure types including focal seizures and spasms in some cases. Outcome is often poor and includes hypotonia and movement disorders. The majority of mutations arise de novo, although we observed a single case of somatic mosaicism in an unaffected parent. [less ▲]

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See detailCHD2 variants are a risk factor for photosensitivity in epilepsy
Galizia, Elizabeth C.; Myers, Candace T.; Leu, Costin et al

in Brain (2015)

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See detailInvestigation of GRIN2A in common epilepsy phenotypes.
Lal, Dennis; Steinbrucker, Sandra; Schubert, Julian et al

in Epilepsy research (2015), 115

Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the ... [more ▼]

Recently, mutations and deletions in the GRIN2A gene have been identified to predispose to benign and severe idiopathic focal epilepsies (IFE), revealing a higher incidence of GRIN2A alterations among the more severe phenotypes. This study aimed to explore the phenotypic boundaries of GRIN2A mutations by investigating patients with the two most common epilepsy syndromes: (i) idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and (ii) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Whole exome sequencing data of 238 patients with IGE as well as Sanger sequencing of 84 patients with TLE were evaluated for GRIN2A sequence alterations. Two additional independent cohorts comprising 1469 IGE and 330 TLE patients were screened for structural deletions (>40kb) involving GRIN2A. Apart from a presumably benign, non-segregating variant in a patient with juvenile absence epilepsy, neither mutations nor deletions were detected in either cohort. These findings suggest that mutations in GRIN2A preferentially are involved in genetic variance of pediatric IFE and do not contribute significantly to either adult focal epilepsies as TLE or generalized epilepsies. [less ▲]

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See detailBiomarkers of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction
Androsova, Ganna UL; Krause, Roland UL; Winterer, Georg et al

in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience (2015), 7(112),

Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD) and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Clinical features include deterioration in ... [more ▼]

Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD) and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Clinical features include deterioration in cognition, disturbance in attention and reduced awareness of the environment and result in higher morbidity, mortality and greater utilization of social financial assistance. The aging Western societies can expect an increase in the incidence of POD and POCD. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied on the molecular level albeit with unsatisfying small research efforts given their societal burden. Here, we review the known physiological and immunological changes and genetic risk factors, identify candidates for further studies and integrate the information into a draft network for exploration on a systems level. The pathogenesis of these postoperative cognitive impairments is multifactorial; application of integrated systems biology has the potential to reconstruct the underlying network of molecular mechanisms and help in the identification of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes
Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Melanie UL et al

in Nature Genetics (2014), 46(12), 1327-32

Febrile seizures affect 2–4% of all children1 and have a strong genetic component2. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)3, 4, 5 have been identified that cause febrile ... [more ▼]

Febrile seizures affect 2–4% of all children1 and have a strong genetic component2. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)3, 4, 5 have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B6, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees7, 8 identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes. [less ▲]

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See detailDe Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies
Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi UL; Barisic, Nina et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2014), 4

Emerging evidence indicates that epileptic encephalopathies are genetically highly heterogeneous, underscoring the need for large cohorts of well-characterized individuals to further define the genetic ... [more ▼]

Emerging evidence indicates that epileptic encephalopathies are genetically highly heterogeneous, underscoring the need for large cohorts of well-characterized individuals to further define the genetic landscape. Through a collaboration between two consortia (EuroEPINOMICS and Epi4K/EPGP), we analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the “classical” epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1 in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p = 8.2 × 10−4), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have an identifiable causal de novo mutation. Strikingly, 75% of mutations in these probands are predicted to disrupt a protein involved in regulating synaptic transmission, and there is a significant enrichment of de novo mutations in genes in this pathway in the entire cohort as well. These findings emphasize an important role for synaptic dysregulation in epileptic encephalopathies, above and beyond that caused by ion channel dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailDe novo mutations in HCN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy
Nava, Caroline; Dalle, Carine; Rastetter, Agnès et al

in Nature Genetics (2014)

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See detailExploring biological interaction networks with tailored weighted quasi-bicliques.
Chang, Wen-Chieh; Vakati, Sudheer; Krause, Roland UL et al

in BMC Bioinformatics (2012), 13 Suppl 10

BACKGROUND: Biological networks provide fundamental insights into the functional characterization of genes and their products, the characterization of DNA-protein interactions, the identification of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Biological networks provide fundamental insights into the functional characterization of genes and their products, the characterization of DNA-protein interactions, the identification of regulatory mechanisms, and other biological tasks. Due to the experimental and biological complexity, their computational exploitation faces many algorithmic challenges. RESULTS: We introduce novel weighted quasi-biclique problems to identify functional modules in biological networks when represented by bipartite graphs. In difference to previous quasi-biclique problems, we include biological interaction levels by using edge-weighted quasi-bicliques. While we prove that our problems are NP-hard, we also describe IP formulations to compute exact solutions for moderately sized networks. CONCLUSIONS: We verify the effectiveness of our IP solutions using both simulation and empirical data. The simulation shows high quasi-biclique recall rates, and the empirical data corroborate the abilities of our weighted quasi-bicliques in extracting features and recovering missing interactions from biological networks. [less ▲]

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See detailSelecting oligonucleotide probes for whole-genome tiling arrays with a cross-hybridization potential.
Hafemeister, Christoph; Krause, Roland UL; Schliep, Alexander

in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (2011), 8(6), 1642-52

For designing oligonucleotide tiling arrays popular, current methods still rely on simple criteria like Hamming distance or longest common factors, neglecting base stacking effects which strongly ... [more ▼]

For designing oligonucleotide tiling arrays popular, current methods still rely on simple criteria like Hamming distance or longest common factors, neglecting base stacking effects which strongly contribute to binding energies. Consequently, probes are often prone to cross-hybridization which reduces the signal-to-noise ratio and complicates downstream analysis. We propose the first computationally efficient method using hybridization energy to identify specific oligonucleotide probes. Our Cross-Hybridization Potential (CHP) is computed with a Nearest Neighbor Alignment, which efficiently estimates a lower bound for the Gibbs free energy of the duplex formed by two DNA sequences of bounded length. It is derived from our simplified reformulation of t-gap insertion-deletion-like metrics. The computations are accelerated by a filter using weighted ungapped q-grams to arrive at seeds. The computation of the CHP is implemented in our software OSProbes, available under the GPL, which computes sets of viable probe candidates. The user can choose a trade-off between running time and quality of probes selected. We obtain very favorable results in comparison with prior approaches with respect to specificity and sensitivity for cross-hybridization and genome coverage with high-specificity probes. The combination of OSProbes and our Tileomatic method, which computes optimal tiling paths from candidate sets, yields globally optimal tiling arrays, balancing probe distance, hybridization conditions, and uniqueness of hybridization. [less ▲]

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See detailThe plexus model for the inference of ancestral multidomain proteins.
Wiedenhoeft, John; Krause, Roland UL; Eulenstein, Oliver

in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (2011), 8(4), 890-901

Interactions of protein domains control essential cellular processes. Thus, inferring the evolutionary histories of multidomain proteins in the context of their families can provide rewarding insights ... [more ▼]

Interactions of protein domains control essential cellular processes. Thus, inferring the evolutionary histories of multidomain proteins in the context of their families can provide rewarding insights into protein function. However, methods to infer these histories are challenged by the complexity of macroevolutionary events. Here, we address this challenge by describing an algorithm that computes a novel network-like structure, called plexus, which represents the evolution of domains and their combinations. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this algorithm with empirical data sets. [less ▲]

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See detailCocos: Constructing multi-domain protein phylogenies.
Homilius, Max; Wiedenhoeft, John; Thieme, Sebastian et al

in PLoS Currents (2011), 3

Phylogenies of multi-domain proteins have to incorporate macro-evolutionary events, which dramatically increases the complexity of their construction.We present an application to infer ancestral multi ... [more ▼]

Phylogenies of multi-domain proteins have to incorporate macro-evolutionary events, which dramatically increases the complexity of their construction.We present an application to infer ancestral multi-domain proteins given a species tree and domain phylogenies. As the individual domain phylogenies are often incongruent, we provide diagnostics for the identification and reconciliation of implausible topologies. We implement and extend a suggested algorithmic approach by Behzadi and Vingron (2006). [less ▲]

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See detailLive Coverage of Scientific Conferences Using Web Technologies
Lister, Allyson L.; Datta, Ruchira S.; Hofmann, Oliver et al

in PLoS Computational Biology (2010), 6(1), 1-2

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See detailLive Coverage of Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology
Lister, Allyson L.; Datta, Ruchira S.; Hofmann, Oliver et al

in PLoS Computational Biology (2010), 6

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