References of "Kornadt, Anna Elena 50038614"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSocial Isolation, Loneliness and Well-being in the Covid-19 Crisis: A Look at Nursing Home Residents in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL et al

in Innovation in Aging (2020), 4(Supplement_1), 957-958

During the COVID-19 crisis, older adults, in particular those with underlying health conditions, were at a special risk for severe illness and mortality, and efforts were made to shield them from exposure ... [more ▼]

During the COVID-19 crisis, older adults, in particular those with underlying health conditions, were at a special risk for severe illness and mortality, and efforts were made to shield them from exposure to the virus. While measures of physical distancing and reduction of in-person contacts were necessary to prevent contraction, they hit residents of care settings particularly hard since visits from family and friends were banned and the risk for loneliness and social isolation increased. In the present study, we therefore gave the voice to nursing home residents and focused on their perceived loneliness and subjective well-being during the crisis. We were both interested in difficulties but also in personal resources and resilience factors that might protect older adults from negative mental health outcomes and help to maintain subjective well-being. A sample of N = 76 residents in care homes in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg were interviewed by use of a standardized questionnaire during July and August 2020. Participants reported on their loneliness and life satisfaction during the crisis, on their self-regulatory strategies as well as on personal and social resources (e.g. self-efficacy, generativity, social support). Data will be analyzed by use of regression analysis to predict loneliness and well-being by risk and protective factors. Results will be discussed applying a life-span developmental and systemic perspective to understand the mutual interplay of individual, social and institutional resources to mitigate negative side effects of protective measures on care home residents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 171 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailCurrent directions in views on aging. Editorial for the Special Section.
Klusmann, Verena; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in European Journal of Ageing (2020), 17

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSocial Roles, Subjective Age, and Gender: Exploring the Links in Later Life
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in Innovation in Aging (2020), 4(Supplement_1), 556-556

Subjective age (SA) is strongly linked to positive developmental outcomes and successful aging. The social roles people assume are supposed to impact SA, since they incorporate age-graded social ... [more ▼]

Subjective age (SA) is strongly linked to positive developmental outcomes and successful aging. The social roles people assume are supposed to impact SA, since they incorporate age-graded social experiences and age-stereotypic role expectations. Social roles are also strongly gendered, providing the opportunity to understand gender-specific processes of SA. This study investigates a broad range of social roles and their relation to older men and women’s SA in later life. N = 285 participants aged 50 to 86 years (Mage = 65.04, SD = 8.88) reported on 19 social roles and their SA. Higher commitment to social roles of continued development and engagement was related to a younger subjective age, above and beyond sociodemographic variables, physical and mental health, but only for younger men. Commitment to family roles was related to a younger subjective age only for older men. Implications for the gender-specific understanding of antecedents of SA are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExamining the Interplay of Generalized and Personal Views on Aging on Physical and Mental Health Across 2.5 Years
Brothers, Allyson; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Nehrkorn-Bailey, Abigail et al

in Innovation in Aging (2020), 4(Supplement_1), 588-588

It remains unknown how distinct types of views on aging (VoA) are related to one another, and to aging outcomes. We used a latent-variable structural equation model to test the hypothesis that generalized ... [more ▼]

It remains unknown how distinct types of views on aging (VoA) are related to one another, and to aging outcomes. We used a latent-variable structural equation model to test the hypothesis that generalized views on aging (assessed as Age Stereotypes (AS)) would influence personal views on aging (assessed as Self-Perceptions of Aging (SPA)), which in-turn would influence later physical and mental health. Data came from a longitudinal survey on VoA (N= 537, MageT1 = 64.13, age rangeT1 = 40-98). As expected, SPA mediated the effect of AS on physical (loss-SPA: β = .23, p< .001; gain-SPA: β = .06, p< .001; R2 = .62) and mental health (loss-SPA: β = .13, p< .001; gain-SPA: β = .03, p< .01, ; R2 = .31). Congruent with theoretical assumptions, our findings provide empirical support for a directional pathway by which generalized views on aging affect health outcomes via personal views of aging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExamining the Relation Among Subjective Age and Working Memory in Old Age on a High-Frequency Basis Across 7 Days
Lücke, Anna; Siebert, Jelena; Schilling, Oliver et al

in Innovation in Aging (2020), 4(Supplement_1), 598-598

While increasing longitudinal evidence suggests that negative age views accelerate cognitive decline and increase dementia risk, we know little about such co-variance dynamics on a daily basis. We make ... [more ▼]

While increasing longitudinal evidence suggests that negative age views accelerate cognitive decline and increase dementia risk, we know little about such co-variance dynamics on a daily basis. We make use of subjective age and working memory performance data obtained six times a day over seven consecutive days as people went about their daily routines from 123 young-old (aged 66-69 years, 47.2% women) and 42 old-old (aged 86-90 years, 55.8% women) adults. Notably, multilevel models revealed considerably-sized short-term intra-individual variation of subjective age and working memory within days and these short-term within-day fluctuations in subjective age and working memory were coupled as expected. Hence, increased subjective age went along with lowered working memory confirming previous research. However, the respective between-day associations appeared reversed. Given this evidence of correlated short-term variability, we also discuss implications of different change dynamics that might explain moment-to-moment versus day-to-day associations between subjective age and working memory. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Uniqueness of Subjective Ageing. Convergent and Discriminant Validity
Spuling, Svenja M.; Klusmann, Verena; Bowen, Catherine E. et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2020), 17

Detailed reference viewed: 122 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailViews on Ageing - A Lifespan Approach
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Kessler, Eva-Marie; Wurm, Susanne et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2020), 17

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailYoung people feel wise and older people feel energetic: Comparing age stereotypes and self-evaluations across adulthood
Bowen, Catherine E.; Spuling, Svenja M.; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2020), 17

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (3 UL)
See detailGesund Altern - Ergebnisse einer Repräsentativumfrage zu Altersbildern junger Erwachsener
Blawert, Anne; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Schröder, Helmut et al

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGenetic and environmental variation in political orientation in adolescence and early adulthood: A Nuclear Twin Family Analysis.
Hufer, Anke; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Kandler, Christian et al

in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2020), 118(4), 762-766

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDomain-specific views on aging and preparation for age-related changes – Development and validation of three brief scales.
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Hess, Thomas M; Rothermund, Klaus

in Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences (2020), 75(2), 303-307

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultidimensional views on aging and old age.
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Wurm, Susanne

in Danan, Gu; Dupre, Matthew E (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSOCIAL ROLES AND PERSONALITY IN LATER LIFE
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in Innovation in Aging (2019), 3(Supplement_1), 729-730

Despite considerable stability of the Big Five personality traits, there is evidence for personality plasticity and change across the lifespan. In younger years, the investment in social roles, such as ... [more ▼]

Despite considerable stability of the Big Five personality traits, there is evidence for personality plasticity and change across the lifespan. In younger years, the investment in social roles, such as entering worklife or starting a family has been shown to drive personality change. With regard to personality in later life, the investigation of social roles has so far been neglected. A questionnaire was developed to assess a large number of social roles that can be assumed in the second half of life. N = 306 participants aged 50 to 86 years reported on their social roles and rated their personality traits. Results show that assuming and investing in certain social roles (e.g. friend, retiree, volunteer) mediated the effects of age on the Big Five, especially for the oldest participants and in the domains openness and extraversion. The findings support the importance of social roles for personality also in later life. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailATTITUDES TOWARD OWN AGING AND PERSONALITY IN LATER LIFE: EXAMINATION OF BIDIRECTIONALITY OVER 20 YEARS
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Siebert, Jelena S.; Wahl, Hans-Werner

in Innovation in Aging (2019), 3(Supplement_1), 385-385

Big Five personality traits are assumed to be linked with attitudes toward own aging (ATOA). Both constructs have central importance for the aging process, it is thus important to comprehensively address ... [more ▼]

Big Five personality traits are assumed to be linked with attitudes toward own aging (ATOA). Both constructs have central importance for the aging process, it is thus important to comprehensively address their mutual connection over time. We used data from the ILSE study, a longitudinal study with four measurement occasions, spanning 20 years and including two participant cohorts (n = 501; born 1950-52 and n = 500; born 1930-32). Dual latent change score models showed that personality was longitudinally related to change in ATOA: Lower Neuroticism, higher Conscientiousness, and higher Openness predicted more positive attitudes; the effect for Extraversion varied by time. Furthermore, the role of personality seems to be confined to certain sensitive periods in midlife and early old age. ATOA had only marginal longitudinal impact on personality. Our results shed light on the developmental co-dynamics of personality and subjective perceptions of aging across the second half of life. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPreparation for Old Age – The Role of Cultural Context and Future Perceptions
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Voss, Peggy; Fung, Helene H. et al

in The Journals of Gerontology. Series B. Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences (2019), 74(4), 609--619

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe interplay of personality and attitudes toward own aging across two decades of later life
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Siebert, Jelena S.; Wahl, Hans-Werner

in PLoS One (2019), 14(10),

Big Five personality traits are assumed to be linked with attitudes toward own aging. Since both constructs have central importance for the aging process, it is surprising that to our knowledge no study ... [more ▼]

Big Five personality traits are assumed to be linked with attitudes toward own aging. Since both constructs have central importance for the aging process, it is surprising that to our knowledge no study so far comprehensively addressed their mutual connection over time. We used data from the ILSE study, a longitudinal study capturing personality and attitudes toward own aging at four measurement occasions, spanning 20 years and including two participant cohorts in midlife (n = 501; born 1950–52) and later life (n = 500; born 1930–32). Dual latent change score models showed that personality was longitudinally related to change in attitudes toward own aging: Lower Neuroticism, higher Conscientiousness, and higher Openness predicted more positive attitudes, whereas the direction of the effect for Extraversion varied by time. Furthermore, the role of personality seems to be confined to certain sensitive periods in midlife and early old age. Contrary to our expectations, attitudes toward own aging had only marginal longitudinal impact on the Big Five. Our results shed light on the developmental co-dynamics of personality and subjective perceptions of aging across the second half of the lifespan. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLife span development
Wurm, Susanne; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in Danan, Gu; Dupre, Matthew E (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPolygenic Scores for Education, Health, and Personality as Predictors of Subjective Age Among Older Individuals of European Ancestry: Evidence From the Health and Retirement Study
Stephan, Yannick; Sutin, Angelina R.; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL et al

in PSYCHOLOGY AND AGING (2019), 34(1), 139-144

The present study aimed to identify whether polygenic scores (PGSs) for education, health and psychological factors are related to subjective age in a large sample of older adults. Participants were 7,763 ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to identify whether polygenic scores (PGSs) for education, health and psychological factors are related to subjective age in a large sample of older adults. Participants were 7,763 individuals of European ancestry (57% women, Mean age = 69.15, SD = 10.18) from the Health and Retirement Study who were genotyped and provided subjective age data. Higher PGSs for educational achievement and well-being were related to a younger subjective age, whereas higher PGSs for neuroticism, body mass index, waist circumference, and depressive symptoms were associated with an older subjective age. This study provides new evidence on the potential genetic underpinnings of subjective age. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelf-perceptions of aging
Wurm, Susanne; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in Danan, Gu; Dupre, Matthew E (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailYOUNG PEOPLE FEEL WISE, OLD PEOPLE FEEL ENERGETIC: COMPARING AGE STEREOTYPES AND SELF-EVALUATIONS ACROSS ADULTHOOD
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Bowen, Catherine E.; Spuling, Svenja M. et al

in Innovation in Aging (2019), 3(Supplement_1), 787-787

Using questionnaire data from the MIDUS study (N=6.325) we examined the extent to which people in their late 20s, 40s, and 60s think that positive stereotypic “old” and “young” characteristics describe ... [more ▼]

Using questionnaire data from the MIDUS study (N=6.325) we examined the extent to which people in their late 20s, 40s, and 60s think that positive stereotypic “old” and “young” characteristics describe themselves, their age peers, and other age groups. A constellation of “old” characteristics (e.g., wise, caring, calm) was seen as more descriptive of older adults, while a constellation of “young” characteristics (e.g., healthy, energetic) was seen as more descriptive of younger adults. Self-evaluations were highly positive and largely consistent across age groups. Compared to their age peers, younger adults saw themselves as having as many positive “young” characteristics but more positive “old” characteristics whereas older adults saw themselves as having more positive “young” characteristics but fewer positive “old” characteristics. The results support the stability of the aging self despite the existence of age stereotypes and the role of negative age stereotypes as a frame of reference for making self-evaluations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (1 UL)