References of "Karavdic, Senad 50002073"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudents' Dropout regarding Academic Employability Skills and Satisfaction Against
Amara, Marie-Emmanuelle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pracana, Clara; Silva, Liliana (Eds.) International psychological Applications and Trends (2013)

With the Lisbon and Bologna processes, studies completion and sustainable employability of students became priorities for European universities. For the Council of European Union, the share of 30-40 year ... [more ▼]

With the Lisbon and Bologna processes, studies completion and sustainable employability of students became priorities for European universities. For the Council of European Union, the share of 30-40 year olds with tertiary educational attainment should be at least 40% by 2020. The young Luxembourg University needs to understand why some students choose to leave without a diploma. Our aim was to analyse the relationships between self-perceiving of the academic employability skills (AES), self-related global quality of life (GQoL) and satisfaction towards against university services (SUS) among persisting and non-persisting students. Design: All freshmen (947) from the three Faculties of Luxembourg University (Sciences & Technology, Law & Finances and Social Sciences) were invited to participate to a cross-sectional survey that took place at beginning of the second semester. Methods: The persisting <br />students were requested to complete an online questionnaire and those who had dropped out during the first semester (non-registered for the second semester) were contacted to responding at the same questions including socio-demographics characteristics: age; sex; nationality (yes/no); work (yes/no); father’s and mother's occupational level and education. A discriminant analysis was undertaken using: the AES scale-6 items (Cronbach’s alpha 0.81); the level of GQoL (1 item, values from 1 “very bad” to 5 “very good”) and the SUS scale-3 items (Cronbach’s alpha 0.74). Findings: 99 persisting students and 68 dropouts have responding. There's no significant age difference between these 2 groups (mean 21.12 years old). Dropouts are more likely young men (55.9% vs. 39.4% persisting, p = 0.036) and have a job (58.2% vs. 3.6% persisting, p = 0.000). Their GQoL is higher (83.3/100 vs. 78.1/100 persisting, p = 0.032), but their AES are lower (55.2/100 vs. 67.3/100 persisting, p°= 0.000). Among them, AES and SUS are positively correlated (correlation 0.414; p = 0.000). Conclusions: Contrary to what described in literature, dropouts are not older than persisting students. They’ve a poorer perception of their employability skills, they're less satisfied with university services (like reputation of university, of faculty and teaching quality). However, they've a better quality of life and much of them have a gainful work. These findings are in line <br />with recent studies suggesting that perceptions of quality of higher education have an impact on students’ satisfaction and behavioral intentions. Further researches will determine nature of links between academic services, employability skills and dropout. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 297 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPsychological quality of life and employability skills among newly registered first-year students:
Baumann, Michèle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL

in Health (2013), 5(3), 617-626

In accord with new European university reforms initiated by the Bologna Process, our objective was to evaluate influences on the relationship between psychological quality of life (QoL) and the ... [more ▼]

In accord with new European university reforms initiated by the Bologna Process, our objective was to evaluate influences on the relationship between psychological quality of life (QoL) and the acquisition of academic employability skills (AES) among first-year students at the Univer- sity in Luxembourg. At the beginning (2 months in) and the end (9 months) of the academic year, 973 newly registered students participated in this study involving two cross-university sur- veys. Students who redoubled or who had stud- ied at other universities were excluded. Data were collected with an online questionnaire com- prising the psychological Whoqol-bref subscale, AES scale, and questions about other related factors. The AES score decreased from 74.2 to 65.6. At both time points, the psychological Whoqol-bref was positively correlated with en-vironmental and social relations QoL and per- ceived general health. Multiple regression mod-els including interaction terms showed that a higher psychological QoL was associated with better general health (difference satisfied-dis- satisfied 9.44), AES (slope 0.099), social rela- tionships QoL (0.321), and environmental QoL (0.298). No interaction with time effects was sig- nificant, which indicates that the effects remain stable with time. If the university could maintain the QoL indicators at appropriate levels or man- age decreases as they occur, it would have im- plications for health promotion and the crea- tion of new student support systems. The SQA- LES project provides valuable information for universities aiming to develop a European High- er Educational Area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 274 (44 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelf-perceived academic employability skills and physical quality of life on first-year university students’ wellbeing
Baumann, Michèle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL

in Pracana, lara; Silva, Liliana (Eds.) International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2013)

With the Bologna Process, students’ wellbeing and generic skills for employability became priorities for European universities, but their respective influences remain unclear. Our aims were to analyse the ... [more ▼]

With the Bologna Process, students’ wellbeing and generic skills for employability became priorities for European universities, but their respective influences remain unclear. Our aims were to analyse the relationships between Academic Employability Skills (AES), psychological suffering (General Health Questionnaire) and psychological quality of life(psychological Whoqol-bref) and other physical, social and environmental Whoqol-bref domains and socio-demographic characteristics. Design: Nine months after the start of their first-year at University of Luxembourg, 973 students were invited to participate at a cross-sectional study. Methods: An online questionnaire was proposed in French, German, and English to assess : a) two instruments described the student’s well-being : 1) Whoqol-bref's psychological subscale-6 items (Cronbach's alpha 0.77) with higher the score, higher the psychological quality of live; 2) GHQ-12 items scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.75) with lower the score, lower the psychological suffering; and one explored the AES-5 items scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.76) (capacities of drafting, solution problem, team work, supervision / direction of others, and use new technologies). Data were analysed using logistic models. Findings: 321 first-year students participated in the study Psychological Whoqol-bref’s and AES’s scores are positively correlated. This relation was verified for each item (drafting, critical spirit, solution to problem, team work, and supervision/direction of others) except use new technologies. Between the correlations of the two instruments only 3/6 items of psychological Whoqol-bref (ability to concentrate, satisfaction with self, negative feelings) are correlated with 8/12 items of GHQ-12 (sleep lost, making decisions, feeling under strain, no overcome difficulties, depressed, loosing self-confidence, considering his/her self as a worthless, reasonably happy). A positive effect between the psychological Whoqol-bref and the AES scores was observed, including with physical, social relationships and environmental domains. No connection exists between the AES and the GHQ-12 scores; on the other side the GHQ-12 score has a negative influence on physical Whoqol-bref status. Conclusions: If a wellbeing suffering contributes in less physical quality of life, the better wellbeing, the higher academic employability skills. Campus should care of students ‘wellbeing and implement counselling activities and adapted environmental to improve their sustainable skills for employability. If the university could maintain the well-being indicators at appropriate levels or manage decreases as they occur, it would have implications for health promotion by creation of new student support systems and <br />services developing sustainable conditions for better European Higher Educational Area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 312 (16 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelf-perceived academic employability skills and physical quality of life on first-year university students’ well-being
Baumann, Michèle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Amara, Marie-Emmanuelle UL

in Pracana, L.; Silva, L. (Eds.) INPACT - International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2013)

With the Bologna Process, students’ wellbeing and generic skills for employability became priorities for European universities, but their respective influences remain unclear. Our aims were to analyse the ... [more ▼]

With the Bologna Process, students’ wellbeing and generic skills for employability became priorities for European universities, but their respective influences remain unclear. Our aims were to analyse the relationships between Academic Employability Skills (AES), psychological suffering (General Health Questionnaire) and psychological quality of life (psychological Whoqol-bref) and other physical, social and environmental Whoqol-bref domains and socio-demographic characteristics. Design. Nine months after the start of their first-year at University of Luxembourg, 973 students were invited to participate at a cross-sectional study. Methods. An online questionnaire was proposed in French, German, and English to assess : a) two instruments described the student’s well-being : 1) Whoqol-bref's psychological subscale-6 items (Cronbach's alpha 0.77) with higher the score, higher the psychological quality of live; 2) GHQ-12 items scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.75) with lower the score, lower the psychological suffering; and one explored the AES-5 items scale (Cronbach's alpha 0.76) (capacities of drafting, solution problem, team work, supervision / direction of others, and use new technologies). . Data were analysed using logistic models. Findings. 321 first-year students participated in the study Psychological Whoqol-bref’s and AES’s scores are positively correlated. This relation was verified for each item (drafting, critical spirit, solution to problem, team work, and supervision/direction of others) except use new technologies. Between the correlations of the two instruments only 3/6 items of psychological Whoqol-bref (ability to concentrate, satisfaction with self, negative feelings) are correlated with 8/12 items of GHQ-12 (sleep lost, making decisions, feeling under strain, no overcome difficulties, depressed, loosing self-confidence, considering his/her self as a worthless, reasonably happy). A positive effect between the psychological Whoqol-bref and the AES scores was observed, including with physical, social relationships and environmental domains. No connection exists between the AES and the GHQ-12 scores; on the other side the GHQ-12 score has a negative influence on physical Whoqol-bref status. Conclusions. If a wellbeing suffering contributes in less physical quality of life, the better wellbeing, the higher academic employability skills. Campus should care of students ‘wellbeing and implement counselling activities and adapted environmental to improve their sustainable skills for employability. If the university could maintain the well-being indicators at appropriate levels or manage decreases as they occur, it would have implications for health promotion by creation of new student support systems and services developing sustainable conditions for better European Higher Educational Area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (12 UL)