References of "König, Ariane 50002126"
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See detailGreen growth in the Benelux: Indicators of local transition to a low-carbon economy in cross-border regions
Bruyninckx, Hans; Martinez-Fernandez; Sharpe, Samantha et al

Report (2013)

This paper discusses the results of a study of measuring green growth in the Benelux countries (Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg). The study paid particular attention to the challenges of measuring ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses the results of a study of measuring green growth in the Benelux countries (Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg). The study paid particular attention to the challenges of measuring the transition to a low-carbon economy in cross-border areas as they have additional levels of complexity when it comes to measuring and monitoring their low-carbon transition. In cross- regions data collection hardly ever coincide with any single data gathering ‘institution’. Moreover, Belgium (Flanders, Brussels, Wallonia), the Netherlands, and Luxembourg have different indicator systems at the national level, and even more so at the more decentralised level which creates problems of data availability, data (in)consistency, and hence comparability. Progress is already noticeable in the two crossborder areas analysed in the study. In Ghent-Terneuzen the bio-base economy is contributing to the value of turnover and growth in employment in the environmental goods and services (EGS) sectors. In Alzette-Belval the construction industry is engaging in resource-efficient building design and certification. In other aspects there is evidence of progress, but this evidence is anecdotal, or patchy in its collection, and not able to be included in the dashboard metrics developed during the study and discussed in the paper. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat might a sustainable university look like? Challenges and opportunities in the development of the University of Luxembourg and its new campus
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailIntroduction: Experimenting for sustainable development? Living laboratories, social learning and the role of the university
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailConclusion: a cross-cultural exploration of the co-creation of knowledge in living laboratories for societal transformation across four continents
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailEnvironmental risk assessment for food-related substances
Smith, M. R.; König, Ariane UL

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1588-1600

This report analyses various environmental risk assessment practices that are currently in place for food-related substances in both the EU and the USA. Within the EU, REACH requires the systematic review ... [more ▼]

This report analyses various environmental risk assessment practices that are currently in place for food-related substances in both the EU and the USA. Within the EU, REACH requires the systematic review of the toxicity of chemicals, with varying degrees of extensiveness of testing required based on the quantities of the chemicals used in practice. Genetically modified organisms are another example of how the environmental impacts of food-producing crops are assessed. The requirements for the use of substances in organic agriculture imply that these should also be assessed for environmental impact. In the USA, the FDA requires environmental assessments for food substance requiring this agency’s action. The EPA has elaborated guidelines for ecological risk assessment that show parallels with the food safety assessment, including the stages of problem formulation, analysis (assessment), and risk characterisation. Also the stakeholder involvement and risk management play an important role in the procedures envisaged by these guidelines. The utility of integrated assessments has been further stressed by WHO/IPCS. It is considered that the new integrated risk-analysis approach recommended by SAFE FOODS can benefit from the integration of environmental issues, including their assessment in the risk–benefit stage of the risk analysis cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailCompatibility of the SAFE FOODS Risk Analysis Framework with the legal and institutional settings of the EU and the WTO
König, Ariane UL

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1638-1652

This paper analyses the compatibility of the SAFE FOODS recommendations with the food safety governance systems of the EU and the World Trade Organisation (WTO), in which standard setting procedures of ... [more ▼]

This paper analyses the compatibility of the SAFE FOODS recommendations with the food safety governance systems of the EU and the World Trade Organisation (WTO), in which standard setting procedures of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) are considered most relevant. The objective is to better understand the implications from (1) the addition of formalised framing and evaluation stages to the risk analysis process and (2) the expansion of the scope of the risk assessment to comprise the distribution of risks, benefits and costs of regulatory measures. The paper concludes that these recommendations of the SAFE FOODS project are compatible to EU law provided they are fine-tuned to legal provisions on specific roles for agencies, EU Member States and the European Commission services. All recommendations are deemed largely compatible with the rules for procedure of the CAC. [less ▲]

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See detailThe SAFE FOODS framework for improved risk analysis of foods.
König, Ariane UL; Kuiper, H. A.; Marvin, H. J. P. et al

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1566-1587

The SAFEFOODS framework proposes an integrated five-step procedure for the risk analysis. The five steps are: framing, risk assessment, evaluation, risk management, and review. The framework is designed ... [more ▼]

The SAFEFOODS framework proposes an integrated five-step procedure for the risk analysis. The five steps are: framing, risk assessment, evaluation, risk management, and review. The framework is designed to address both risks and benefits. The SAFEFOODS approach introduces a 20-member Interface Committee, headed by a risk manager, to run the procedure. First third of the members is risk managers, second third is independent scientific experts and the last third is stakeholders with economic interests and with consumer interests. The role of the different steps in the procedure and the role of each category of Committee Members during the process are described. The proposal suggests a strict separation of responsibilities between managerial members on one side and scientific members and stakeholder members on the other side. This division of responsibilities in the committee opens up new possibilities for transparency, openness and participation without violation of the delegation-of-power rule. For the communication with the interested parties and the public at large during the process it is foreseen to create an Internet Forum, and use press conferences, press releases and interviews. Overall the SAFEFOODS proposal shall be seen as an invitation for rethinking the current risk assessment/risk management system in EU. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic assessment of food safety standards: Costs and benefits of alternative approaches
Traill, W. B.; König, Ariane UL

in Food Control (2010), 21(12), 1611-1619

This article provides an overview of economic methods to measure costs and benefits related to food safety issues. After an introduction on general economic principles, including the distinction between ... [more ▼]

This article provides an overview of economic methods to measure costs and benefits related to food safety issues. After an introduction on general economic principles, including the distinction between social and private costs and benefits, the article highlights the various methods for calculation of costs and benefits, including "willingness to pay", amongst others. Particular attention is paid to the "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY) method for quantitatively expressing health impacts. The practice of Regulatory Impact Assessments as carried out by the UK authorities is explored in more detail as an example of cost-benefit analysis of regulatory measures. The applicability of the approaches to the various stages of the SAFE FOODS model is highlighted. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailThe views of key stakeholders on an evolving food risk governance framework: Results from a Delphi study
Wentholt, M.T.A.; Rowe, G.; König, Ariane UL et al

in Food Policy (2009), 34(6), 539-548

Evidence of a decline in public trust associated with food risk governance over recent years has called into question the appropriateness of the current dominant risk analysis framework. Within the EU ... [more ▼]

Evidence of a decline in public trust associated with food risk governance over recent years has called into question the appropriateness of the current dominant risk analysis framework. Within the EU-funded SAFE FOODS project a novel risk analysis framework has been developed that attempts to address potential shortcomings by increasing stakeholder (including consumer) input, improving transparency, and formally incorporating benefit and non-health aspects into the analysis. To assess the viability of this novel framework, the views of food risk experts from the EU and beyond were sought using a distributed online questionnaire process called Delphi. In this paper the main results of this survey are described, revealing varying levels of support for the key innovations of the novel framework. Implications of our results for the new and old frameworks, for the future of risk analysis, and for the policy community more widely, are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDemocratizing Decision-Making on Food-Safety in the E.U.: Closing gaps between principles of governance and practice
König, Ariane UL

in Minerva (2007), 45(3), 275-294

Food safety is a preoccupation of the European Commission, but there are major shortcomings in its governance. Reviewing legislation and practice, this paper explores the background of EU food safety ... [more ▼]

Food safety is a preoccupation of the European Commission, but there are major shortcomings in its governance. Reviewing legislation and practice, this paper explores the background of EU food safety institutions, and develops recommendations to make the EU decision process more transparent, accountable, and democratic. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards safer foods and more democratic decisions: Is this a contradictory goal?
König, Ariane UL

in Oléagineux, Corps Gras, Lipides (2007), 14(2), 92-99

Since the mid-1990s and the BSE crisis food safety policy is a priority of the EU. In practise there are however many hurdles towards implementing principles of improved governance, such as transparency ... [more ▼]

Since the mid-1990s and the BSE crisis food safety policy is a priority of the EU. In practise there are however many hurdles towards implementing principles of improved governance, such as transparency and greater participation, especially at EU-level. This paper presents the work of the SAFE FOODS prospect towards the development an improved framework for risk analysis. The final aim is to develop concrete recommendations on how to facilitate coordination between risk assessors, risk managers and stakeholders across the EU, and to keep methods for risk assessment apace with developments in the life sciences. [less ▲]

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See detailGovernance of Food Safety in the European Union
König, Ariane UL

in Carruth, Reba Anne (Ed.) Global Governance of Food and Agriculture Industries: Transatlantic Regulatory Harmonization and Multilateral Policy Cooperation for Food Safety (2006)

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See detailA quantitative analysis of fish consumption and stroke risk.
Bouzan, C.; Cohen, J. T.; Connor, W. E. et al

in American Journal of Preventive Medicine (2005), 29(4), 347-352

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government ... [more ▼]

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government recommendations for women of childbearing age are to modify consumption of high-MeHg fish to reduce MeHg exposure, while recommendations encourage fish consumption among the general population because of the nutritional benefits. The Harvard Center for Risk Analysis convened an expert panel (see acknowledgements) to quantify the net impact of resulting hypothetical changes in fish consumption across the population. This paper estimates the impact of fish consumption on stroke risk. Other papers quantify coronary heart disease mortality risk and the impacts of both prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs on cognitive development. This analysis identified articles in a recent qualitative literature review that are appropriate for the development of a dose-response relationship between fish consumption and stroke risk. Studies had to satisfy quality criteria, quantify fish intake, and report the precision of the relative risk estimates. The analysis combined the relative risk results, weighting each proportionately to its precision. Six studies were identified as appropriate for inclusion in this analysis, including five prospective cohort studies and one case-control study (total of 24 exposure groups). Our analysis indicates that any fish consumption confers substantial relative risk reduction compared to no fish consumption (12% for the linear model), with the possibility that additional consumption confers incremental benefits (central estimate of 2.0% per serving per week). [less ▲]

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See detailFish consumption and coronary heart disease: A review of data on the dose-response relationship
König, Ariane UL; Cohen, J. T.; Bouzan, C. et al

in American Journal of Preventive Medicine (2005), 29(4), 335-346

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government ... [more ▼]

Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government recommendations for women of childbearing age are to modify consumption of high-MeHg fish to reduce MeHg exposure, while recommendations encourage fishconsumption among the general population because of the nutritional benefits. The Harvard Center for Risk Analysis convened an expert panel (see acknowledgments) to quantify the net impact of resulting hypothetical changes in fishconsumption across the population. This paper estimates the impact of fishconsumption on coronaryheartdisease (CHD) mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI). Other papers quantify stroke risk and the impacts of both prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs on cognitive development. This analysis identified articles in a recent qualitative review appropriate for the development of a dose–response relationship. Studies had to satisfy quality criteria, quantify fish intake, and report the precision of the relative risk estimates. Relative risk results were averaged, weighted proportionately by precision. CHD risks associated with MeHg exposure were reviewed qualitatively because the available literature was judged inadequate for quantitative analysis. Eight studies were identified (29 exposure groups). Our analysis estimated that consuming small quantities of fish is associated with a 17% reduction in CHD mortality risk, with each additional serving per week associated with a further reduction in this risk of 3.9%. Small quantities of fishconsumption were associated with risk reductions in nonfatal MI risk by 27%, but additional fishconsumption conferred no incremental benefits. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of the safety of foods derived from genetically modified crops
König, Ariane UL; Cockburn, A.; Crevel, R. et al

in Food & Chemical Toxicology (2004), 42

This paper provides guidance on how to assess the safety of foods derived from genetically modified crops (GM crops); it summarises conclusions and recommendations of Working Group 1 of the ENTRANSFOOD ... [more ▼]

This paper provides guidance on how to assess the safety of foods derived from genetically modified crops (GM crops); it summarises conclusions and recommendations of Working Group 1 of the ENTRANSFOOD project. The paper provides an approach for adapting the test strategy to the characteristics of the modified crop and the introduced trait, and assessing potential unintended effects from the genetic modification. The proposed approach to safetyassessment starts with the comparison of the new GM crop with a traditional counterpart that is generally accepted as safe based on a history of human food use (the concept of substantial equivalence). This case-focused approach ensures that foods derived from GM crops that have passed this extensive test-regime are as safe and nutritious as currently consumed plant-derived foods. The approach is suitable for current and future GM crops with more complex modifications. First, the paper reviews test methods developed for the risk assessment of chemicals, including food additives and pesticides, discussing which of these methods are suitable for the assessment of recombinant proteins and whole foods. Second, the paper presents a systematic approach to combine test methods for the safetyassessment of foods derived from a specific GM crop. Third, the paper provides an overview on developments in this area that may prove of use in the safetyassessment of GM crops, and recommendations for research priorities. It is concluded that the combination of existing test methods provides a sound test-regime to assess the safety of GM crops. Advances in our understanding of molecular biology, biochemistry, and nutrition may in future allow further improvement of test methods that will over time render the safetyassessment of foods even more effective and informative. [less ▲]

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See detailCombining multiple viewpoints on genetically modified foods
König, Ariane UL

Report (2004)

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See detailA framework for designing transgenic crops - science, safety, and citizen’s concerns.
König, Ariane UL

in Nature Biotechnology (2003), 21(11), 1274-1279

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See detailForum Comment
König, Ariane UL

in Science & Technology (2003), XX

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