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See detailAutomation, Growth, and Factor Shares in the Era of Population Aging
Irmen, Andreas UL

Presentation (2019)

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question ... [more ▼]

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question in a new model of automation where competitive firms perform tasks to produce output. Tasks require labor and machines as inputs. New machines embody superior technological knowledge and substitute for labor in the performance of tasks. The incentive to automate is stronger when the expected wage is higher or when the price of an automation investment is lower. Automation is shown to i) boost the aggregate demand for labor if the incentives to automate are strong enough and ii) reduce the labor share. These predictions obtain even though automation is labor-augmenting in the economy’s reduced-form production function. In the short run, population aging weakens the incentives to automate and increases the labor share as individuals augment their labor supply. These implications may be neutralized if, at the same time, the price of investment goods declines. In the log-run, population aging and a lower price of investment goods are reinforcing. Both imply more automation, a lower labor share, and faster economic growth. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomation, Growth, and Factor Shares in the Era of Population Aging
Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question ... [more ▼]

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question in a new model of automation where competitive firms perform tasks to produce output. Tasks require labor and machines as inputs. New machines embody superior technological knowledge and substitute for labor in the performance of tasks. The incentive to automate is stronger when the expected wage is higher or when the price of an automation investment is lower. Automation is shown to i) boost the aggregate demand for labor if the incentives to automate are strong enough and ii) reduce the labor share. These predictions obtain even though automation is labor-augmenting in the economy’s reduced-form production function. In the short run, population aging weakens the incentives to automate and increases the labor share as individuals augment their labor supply. These implications may be neutralized if, at the same time, the price of investment goods declines. In the log-run, population aging and a lower price of investment goods are reinforcing. Both imply more automation, a lower labor share, and faster economic growth. [less ▲]

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See detailRents and Research in Modern Growth Theory
Irmen, Andreas UL

Presentation (2019)

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See detailCatalyzing the Benefits of Globalization - Panel Chair of the session "Revitalizing Economic Grwoth"
Irmen, Andreas UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

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See detailWie Luxemburg weiter wachsen kann
Irmen, Andreas UL

Article for general public (2018)

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See detailBaustelle Digitalisierung
Irmen, Andreas UL; André, Bauler

Article for general public (2018)

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See detailTechnological Progress, the Supply ofHours Worked, and the Consumption-Leisure Complementarity
Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2018)

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption ... [more ▼]

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption-leisure complementarity explains these stylized facts. Technological progress drives real wages up and expands the amount of available consumption goods. Enjoying consumption goods increases the value of leisure. Therefore, individuals demand more leisure and supply less labor. This mechanism appears in an OLG-model with two-period lived individuals equipped with per-period utility functions of the generalized log-log type proposed by Boppart-Krusell (2016). The optimal plan is piecewise defined and hinges on the wage level. Technological progress moves a poor economy out of a regime with low wages and an inelastic supply of hours worked into a regime where wages increase further and hours worked continuously decline. [less ▲]

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See detailTASKS, TECHNOLOGY, AND FACTOR PRICES IN THE NEOCLASSICAL PRODUCTION SECTOR
Irmen, Andreas UL

E-print/Working paper (2018)

This paper introduces tasks into the neoclassical production sector. Competitive firms choose the profit-maximizing amounts of factor-specific tasks that determine their factor demands and output supplies ... [more ▼]

This paper introduces tasks into the neoclassical production sector. Competitive firms choose the profit-maximizing amounts of factor-specific tasks that determine their factor demands and output supplies. We show that the effect of factor-augmenting technical change on relative and absolute factor prices can be decomposed into a productivity effect and a market size effect of opposite sign. These effects appear since the novel task-based approach distinguishes between the demands for tasks and the demands for factors. This perspective provides a new intuition for the emergence of relative and absolute factor biases and the role of the elasticity of substitution. [less ▲]

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See detailA Generalized Steady-State Growth Theorem
Irmen, Andreas UL

in Macroeconomic Dynamics (2018)

Uzawa’s steady-state growth theorem (Uzawa (1961)) is generalized to a neoclassical economy that uses current output, e.g., to create technical progress or to manufacture intermediates. The difference ... [more ▼]

Uzawa’s steady-state growth theorem (Uzawa (1961)) is generalized to a neoclassical economy that uses current output, e.g., to create technical progress or to manufacture intermediates. The difference between aggregate final-good production and these resources is referred to as net output. The new generalized steady-state growth theorem holds since net output exhibits constant returns to scale in capital and labor. This insight provides an understanding for why technical change is labor-augmenting in steady state even if capital-augmenting technical change is feasible. By example, this point is made for four growth mod-els that allow for endogenous capital- and labor-augmenting technical change, namely, Irmen and Tabakovic (2015), Acemoglu (2003), Acemoglu (2009), Chapter 15, and for the typical model of the induced innovations literature of the 1960s.The reduced form of these models is shown to be consistent with the generalizedsteady-state growth theorem. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnological Progress, the Supply ofHours Worked, and the Consumption-Leisure Complementarity
Irmen, Andreas UL

E-print/Working paper (2018)

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption ... [more ▼]

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption-leisure complementarity explains these stylized facts. Technological progress drives real wages up and expands the amount of available consumption goods. Enjoying consumption goods increases the value of leisure. Therefore, individuals demand more leisure and supply less labor. This mechanism appears in an OLG-model with two-period lived individuals equipped with per-period utility functions of the generalized log-log type proposed by Boppart-Krusell (2016). The optimal plan is piecewise defined and hinges on the wage level. Technological progress moves a poor economy out of a regime with low wages and an inelastic supply of hours worked into a regime where wages increase further and hours worked continuously decline. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (1 UL)
See detailEconomic Growth: Past, Present, and Future
Irmen, Andreas UL

Speeches/Talks (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (3 UL)
See detailSecurity of Financial Systems and Economic Policies
Irmen, Andreas UL

Speeches/Talks (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 UL)