References of "Hussinger, Katrin 50002016"
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See detailIs Success Hereditary? Evidence on the Performance of Spawned Ventures
Dick, Johannes; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Blumberg, Boris et al

in Small Business Economics (2013)

A common phenomenon in entrepreneurship is that employees turn away from employment to found their own businesses. Prior literature discusses the former employers’ characteristics that influence the ... [more ▼]

A common phenomenon in entrepreneurship is that employees turn away from employment to found their own businesses. Prior literature discusses the former employers’ characteristics that influence the creation of entrepreneurial ventures. An investigation of whether these characteristics also affect the success of the spawned ventures is missing so far. This paper contributes to the literature by showing that entrepreneurial ventures spawned by well performing firms are financially more successful than ventures stemming from poorly performing firms. This suggests that spawned entrepreneurs are able to exploit valuable knowledge from their previous employers which impacts their ventures’ performance positively. The analysis is based on a linked employee–employer data set for the Netherlands for the period 1999–2004. [less ▲]

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See detailFormal and Informal Technology Transfer from Academia to Industry: Complementarity Effects and Innovation Performance
Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Industry and Innovation (2013)

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See detailHow valuable are Patent Blocking Strategies?
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Leten, Bart

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 178 (4 UL)
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See detailResource Complementarity and Value Capture in Firm Acquisitions: The Role of Intellectual Property Rights
Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin UL

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (2 UL)
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See detailInsider Trading and the Patent Application Process
Hussinger, Katrin UL; Keusch, Thomas; Moers, Frank

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 146 (5 UL)
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See detailFormal and Informal Technology Transfer from Academia to Industry: Complementarity Effects and Innovation Performance
Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Industry and Innovation (2013)

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See detailCorporate Science in the Patent System: An Analysis of the Semiconductor Technology
Della Malva, Antonio; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2012)

Corporate scientific publications are often presented as a strategic means for firms to create prior art with the objective to prevent others from patenting related inventions. This presumes that ... [more ▼]

Corporate scientific publications are often presented as a strategic means for firms to create prior art with the objective to prevent others from patenting related inventions. This presumes that corporate publications enter the pool of prior art which is relevant to judge the novelty of patent applications at the patent office and that corporate science has the power to block patent applications. This paper analyses for the first time whether the presumed mechanism behind corporate publications as a means to preempt patents works. With a focus on the semiconductor technology, our results show that scientific publications by corporations challenge the novelty of patent applications at the European Patent Office (EPO) significantly more than other pieces of prior art. Detailed information from the EPO patent examination procedure allows us to show that corporate publications threaten the novelty of patent applications if combined with other pieces of prior art like patents rather than as standalone documents. This supports the claim that corporate scientific publishing can be an effective means for firms to protect their freedom to operate if used as a complementary part of a firm’s overall IP protection strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailAbsorptive Capacity and Post-Merger Inventor Productivity
Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Journal of Technology Transfer (2012)

Inventors often experience a low productivity after their company has been subject to a merger or acquisition (M&As). It is of central managerial interest to identify factors facilitating the integration ... [more ▼]

Inventors often experience a low productivity after their company has been subject to a merger or acquisition (M&As). It is of central managerial interest to identify factors facilitating the integration of new inventive staff and thereby counteracting innovation declines after M&As. This paper provides empirical evidence into the role of acquiring firms’ absorptive capacity for the post-merger patent productivity of the acquired inventors. Based on a sample of 544 inventors employed by European acquisition targets in the period 2000–2001 it is shown that the post-merger productivity of acquired inventors is significantly higher within acquiring firms with a distinct absorptive capacity. It can be concluded that absorptive capacity is a firm capability that enhances the integration of inventors after firm takeovers. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Nexus between Science and Industry: Evidence from Faculty Inventions
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Schneider, Cedric

in Journal of Technology Transfer (2012)

Knowledge transfer from science to industry has been shown to be beneficial for the corporate partner. In order to get a better understanding of the reasons behind these positive effects, this study ... [more ▼]

Knowledge transfer from science to industry has been shown to be beneficial for the corporate partner. In order to get a better understanding of the reasons behind these positive effects, this study focuses on the junction of science and industry by comparing characteristics of academic inventions that are transferred to industry and those staying in the public sector. Academic inventions are identified via patent applications of German academic scientists. We find that academic patents assigned to corporations are more likely to enable firms reaping short term rather than, possibly more uncertain, long-run returns, in contrast to patents that stay in the public sector. Firms also strive for academic inventions with a high blocking potential in technology markets. Academic patents issued to corporations appear to reflect less complex inventions as compared to inventions that are patented by the public science sector. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropean Market Integration through Technology-driven M&As
Frey, Rainer; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Applied Economics (2011)

Merger and Acquisitions (M&As) have been an important tool for reorganizing the European market since the establishment of European Economic and Monetary Union. This article suggests that European ... [more ▼]

Merger and Acquisitions (M&As) have been an important tool for reorganizing the European market since the establishment of European Economic and Monetary Union. This article suggests that European integration helped and encouraged European firms to source technology across national borders in Europe, establishing European innovative firms. The figures confirm that, once barriers impeding the free movement of capital, goods and labour had fallen, European firms used M&As intensively to enter foreign European markets. Enhancing technology competencies is found to be one of the main motives for cross-border acquisitions in the 1990s but is not a factor in domestic acquisitions over the same period. [less ▲]

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See detailInventions under Siege? The Impact of Technology Competition on Licensing
Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Academy of Management, Best Paper Proceedings (2011)

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See detailCosts and Benefits of Inter-Departmental Innovation Collaboration
Cuijpers, Maarten; Guenter, Hannes; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Research Policy (2011)

Inter-departmental innovation collaboration facilitates innovation performance. At the same time, it has been identified as a source of increased coordination costs. Using organizational information ... [more ▼]

Inter-departmental innovation collaboration facilitates innovation performance. At the same time, it has been identified as a source of increased coordination costs. Using organizational information processing theory, this paper builds and tests hypotheses on the costs and benefits of innovation-related collaboration within firms. Based on a sample of 433 German manufacturing firms we show interdepartmental innovation collaboration to increase process innovation performance, but also to produce costs in terms of project delay and project termination. These costs, however, do not affect innovation performance at the firm level. This finding suggests firms to be well able to balance the costs and benefits of inter-departmental collaboration across their innovation project portfolio. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCommercializing Academic Research: The Quality of Faculty Patenting
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Schneider, Cedric

in Industrial and Corporate Change (2011)

The knowledge produced by academic scientists has been identified as a potential key driver of technological progress. Recent policies in Europe aim at increasing commercially orientated activities in ... [more ▼]

The knowledge produced by academic scientists has been identified as a potential key driver of technological progress. Recent policies in Europe aim at increasing commercially orientated activities in academe. Based on a sample of German scientists across all fields of science, we investigate the importance of academic patenting. Our findings suggest that academic involvement in patenting results in a citation premium, as academic patents appear to generate more forward citations. We also find that in the European context of changing research objectives and funding sources since the mid-1990s, the “importance” of academic patents declines over time. We show that academic entrants have patents of lower “quality” than academic incumbents but they did not cause the decline, since the relative importance of patents involving academics with an existing patenting history declined over time as well. Moreover, a preliminary evaluation of the effects of the abolishment of the “professor privilege” (the German counterpart of the US Bayh-Dole Act) reveals that this legal disposition led to an acceleration of this apparent decline. [less ▲]

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See detail“Wacky” Patents Meet Economic Indicators
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Schneider, Cedric

in Economics Letters (2011)

We investigate whether standard indicators can distinguish between ‘‘wacky’’ patents and a control group. Forward citations are good predictors of importance. However, ‘‘wacky’’ patents have higher ... [more ▼]

We investigate whether standard indicators can distinguish between ‘‘wacky’’ patents and a control group. Forward citations are good predictors of importance. However, ‘‘wacky’’ patents have higher originality, generality and citation lags, suggesting that these indicators should be interpreted carefully. [less ▲]

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See detailExports versus FDI in German Manufacturing: Firm Performance and Participation in International Markets
Arnold, Jens Matthias; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Review of World Economics (2010)

This paper tests some of the predictions of recent advances in trade theory that have focused on different trade patterns of firms within the same sector. Helpman, Melitz and Yeaple (2005) develop a model ... [more ▼]

This paper tests some of the predictions of recent advances in trade theory that have focused on different trade patterns of firms within the same sector. Helpman, Melitz and Yeaple (2005) develop a model in which innate productivity differences between firms determine the degree of international engagement of firms: The least productive firms produce for the domestic market, better performers engage in export activities, and the top firms establish foreign subsidiaries. Using German firm-level data from 1996 to 2002, we test this prediction using non-parametric methods, by examining the distribution functions of the three subsets of firms for stochastic dominance. Rather than just comparing first moments, this technique allows us to compare productivity over the entire distribution. Our results show robust support for the prediction from theory. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Importance of Technology for Firm Acquisitions: SMEs versus Large Acquisition Targets
Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Technovation (2010)

This paper empirically investigates a sample of German domestic merger and acquisitions (M&As) in the 1990s to analyze the importance of a related technology portfolio in the decision to acquire a ... [more ▼]

This paper empirically investigates a sample of German domestic merger and acquisitions (M&As) in the 1990s to analyze the importance of a related technology portfolio in the decision to acquire a particular firm. The novelty of this analysis lies in the fact that the sample does not contain exclusively large firms, but also a large share of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The empirical results suggest that firms engage in M&As to strengthen their technological competencies. A related technology portfolio is, in particular, important for the decision to acquire SMEs. This suggests an information advantage of acquirers with related technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailHeterogeneity of Patenting and Implications for Basic Research
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Glanzel, Wolfgang; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Research Policy (2009)

The increasing commercialization of university discoveries has initiated a controversy on the impact for scientific research. It has been argued that an increasing orientation towards commercialization ... [more ▼]

The increasing commercialization of university discoveries has initiated a controversy on the impact for scientific research. It has been argued that an increasing orientation towards commercialization may have a negative impact on more fundamental research efforts in science. Several scholars have therefore analyzed the relationship between publication and patenting activity of university researchers, and most articles report positive correlations between patenting and publishing activities of scientists. However, previous studies do not account for heterogeneity of patenting activities. This paper explores the incidence of patenting and publishing of scientists distinguishing between corporate patents and patents assigned to non-profit organizations for a largesample of professors active in Germany. While patents assigned to nonprofit organizations (incl. individual ownership of the professors themselves) complement publication quantity and quality, patents assigned to corporations are negatively related to quantity and quality of publication output. [less ▲]

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See detailWhy Challenge the Ivory Tower? New Evidence on the Basicness of Academic Patents
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Schneider, Cedric

in Kyklos: Internationale Zeitschrift für Sozialwissenschaften (2009)

While often presumed in academic literature and policy discussions there is little empirical evidence showing that academic patents protectmore basic inventions than corporate patents. This study provides ... [more ▼]

While often presumed in academic literature and policy discussions there is little empirical evidence showing that academic patents protectmore basic inventions than corporate patents. This study provides new evidence on the basicness of academic patents using German professor patents linked to patent opposition data from the European Patent Office (EPO). Patent oppositions are the most important mechanism by which the validity of patents filed at the EPO can be challenged. Controlling for patent value, asymmetric information and diverging expectations between the opposition parties, the likelihood of a potentially litigious situation and the relative costs of opposition versus settlement, we find that academic patents are opposed less frequently than a control group of corporate patents.This suggests that academic patents cover rather basic inventions with a low immediate commercial value not threatening current returns of potential plaintiffs. The effect is weaker for academic patents filed in collaboration with the business sector, which suggests that those patents are evaluated as more applied by owners of potentially rival technologies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (1 UL)