References of "Glock, Sabine 40020803"
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See detail„Bitte ein….“: Der Einfluss von Alkoholwerbung auf Einstellungen und Verhalten
Unz, Dagmar; Glock, Sabine UL; Kovacs, Carrie UL

in Rossmann, Constanze; Hastall, Matthias R. (Eds.) Medien und Gesundheitskommunikation: Befunde, Entwicklungen und Herausforderungen (2013)

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See detailBeyond judgment bias: How students' ethnicity and academic profile consistency influence teachers' tracking judgments
Glock, Sabine UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Klapproth, Florian UL et al

in Social Psychology of Education (2013), 16

Research on school tracking has provided evidence that students with immigrant backgrounds are overrepresented in the lower school tracks. As teachers are the main decision makers when it comes to ... [more ▼]

Research on school tracking has provided evidence that students with immigrant backgrounds are overrepresented in the lower school tracks. As teachers are the main decision makers when it comes to tracking, we investigated whether teachers’ tracking judgments are biased by the immigrant backgrounds of the students and how teachers’ tracking judgments are affected by inconsistencies in students’ academic profiles. Drawing on dual process models of judgment formation, we conducted two experimental studies to investigate teachers’ judgments. The results of both studies showed less favorable teacher judgments of students with immigrant backgrounds than of students without immigrant backgrounds. Students with inconsistent academic profiles were also judged less favorably than students with consistent profiles. Think aloud data indicated careful processing of all information both for students with immigrant backgrounds and students with inconsistent profiles. Results are discussed with regard to their underlyingmechanisms as well as with regard to their implications for teacher training. [less ▲]

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See detail"Smoking kills” vs. “Smoking makes restless”: Effectiveness of different warning labels on smoking behavior
Glock, Sabine UL; Ritter, Simone; Engels, R. C. M. E. et al

in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences (2013), 2

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See detailStudent teachers’ implicit attitudes toward students with and without immigration background: A pilot study
Glock, Sabine UL; Kneer, Julia; Kovacs, Carrie UL

in Studies in Educational Evaluation (2013), 39

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See detailEscaping in digital games: The relationship between playing motives and addictive tendencies in males
Kneer, Julia; Glock, Sabine UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2013), 29

Problematic playing behaviour in terms of addiction is well known to be associated with specific traits (e.g., self-esteem) and weak social settings (e.g., negative relationships). What remains unclear is ... [more ▼]

Problematic playing behaviour in terms of addiction is well known to be associated with specific traits (e.g., self-esteem) and weak social settings (e.g., negative relationships). What remains unclear is the impact of playing motives on addictive tendencies. We investigated how playing motives were related to problematic playing behaviour. Using ratings indicating explicit motives and response latencies indicating the activation of implicit motives, we investigated Yee’s (2006) three main playing motives: social interaction, achievement, and immersion. All three implicit motives were found to be highly activated among problematic players while only explicit immersion was judged as less important by non-problematic and excessive players. In addition, implicit immersion together with explicit immersion and playing hours were found to be strong predictors for problematic playing behaviour. We discuss motives, especially immersion, as possible risk factors for addictive tendencies when motives become internalised and therefore automatically activated by thoughts about digital games. [less ▲]

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See detailImproving teachers’ judgments: Accountability affects teachers’ tracking decisions
Glock, Sabine UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Klapproth, Florian UL et al

in International Journal of Technology and Inclusive Education (2012), 1

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See detailAccountability as a moderator of teachers' tracking decisions: Two experimental studies
Glock, Sabine UL; Klapproth, Florian UL; Böhmer, Matthias UL et al

in Shoniregun, C. A.; Akmayeva, G. A. (Eds.) Ireland International Conference on Education - IIEC 2012 proceedings (2012)

In some European countries, teachers select students for entry into different secondary school types on the basis of students’ achievement level. In Luxembourg, teachers join a council to select students ... [more ▼]

In some European countries, teachers select students for entry into different secondary school types on the basis of students’ achievement level. In Luxembourg, teachers join a council to select students. PISA provided evidence that students with immigration background and/or low socioeconomic status are underrepresented in the highest school track. The question arises whether teachers’ tracking decisions are biased towards non-performance-related cues. Dual process theories of judgment suggest accountability to be a moderator of judgment accuracy. Judgments of highly accountable teachers should be less biased through non-performance-related cues than those of teachers with low accountability. In groups, diffusion of responsibility may occur, thereby reducing accountability of the individual members. We designed two experiments to investigate whether teachers’ tracking decisions differ given different levels of accountability. In both studies, teachers in the high accountability condition did not rely on nonperformance- related cues. Increasing accountability for teachers’ decisions could reduce disadvantages of immigration and low SES students. [less ▲]

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See detailSchool placement decisions in Luxembourg: Do teachers meet the Education Ministry’s standards?
Klapproth, Florian UL; Glock, Sabine UL; Böhmer, Matthias UL et al

in Literacy Information and Computer Education Journal (2012), 1

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See detailDo social variables affect school placement decisions in Luxembourg?
Klapproth, Florian UL; Glock, Sabine UL; Böhmer, Matthias UL et al

in Shoniregun, C. A.; Akmayeva, G. A. (Eds.) Ireland International Conference on Education - IIEC 2012 proceedings (2012)

In Luxembourg, the assignment of primary-school students to one of the tracks in secondary school is regulated by the Luxembourgish Ministry of Education. These regulations entail four criteria according ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, the assignment of primary-school students to one of the tracks in secondary school is regulated by the Luxembourgish Ministry of Education. These regulations entail four criteria according to which decisions about the assignment should be made. With the study at hand, it was examined whether teachers meet these four criteria when assigning students to either the academic track or the vocational track of secondary school. We conducted multi-level regression analyses on a representative sample of 2,731 Luxembourgish primary school 6th graders. Six major results were obtained. (1) Students’ school marks in language courses were most predictive for school placement decisions. (2) School marks were on average of more predictive value than were scores of standardized scholastic achievement tests. (3) Working and learning habits of the students played a role when teachers made their school placement decisions. (4) There was a strong positive relationship between the teachers’ placement decisions and the parents’ schooling preferences. (5) The socio-economic back- ground of the students did substantially affect school placement decisions. (6) Even when achievement variables were controlled for, migration background of students contributed significantly to teachers’ school placement decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailAre digital games perceived as fun or danger? Supporting and suppressing different game-related concepts
Kneer, Julia; Glock, Sabine UL; Beskes, Sarah et al

in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking (2012), 15

Violent digital game play has repeatedly been discussed to be strongly related to aggression and emotional instability. Thus, digital game players have to defend against these prejudices through ... [more ▼]

Violent digital game play has repeatedly been discussed to be strongly related to aggression and emotional instability. Thus, digital game players have to defend against these prejudices through emphasizing positive game-related concepts such as achievement, social interaction, and immersion. We experimentally investigated which positive- and negative-concept players and nonplayers activate when being primed with digital games. Participants were either exposed to violent or nonviolent game content and were required to work on a lexical decision task. Results showed that response latencies for the concept aggression and emotional instability were faster than for neutral concepts (not associated with digital games), but slower than for the positive concepts sociality and competition. Both players and nonplayers felt the need to defend against prejudices and emphasized positive concepts. Neither their own gaming experience nor the game content influenced the results. Being a part of the net generation is sufficient to suppress negative game-related concepts and to support positive game-related concepts to protect digital games as common leisure activity among peers. [less ▲]

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See detailFast and not furious? Cognitive dissonance reduction in smokers.
Kneer, Julia; Glock, Sabine UL; Rieger, Diana

in Social Psychology (2012), 43

Three studies explored whether cognitive dissonance in smokers is reduced immediately or remains constant due to the perceived health risk. Because dissonance-reducing strategies might occur very quickly ... [more ▼]

Three studies explored whether cognitive dissonance in smokers is reduced immediately or remains constant due to the perceived health risk. Because dissonance-reducing strategies might occur very quickly and previous research has focused only on ratings concerning health risk, we additionally analyzed response latencies and psychophysiological arousal as more implicit measurements. In Study 1, 2, and 3, participants rated their smoking-related health risks twice for different diseases. Ratings, response latencies (Study 1, 2), and psychophysiological arousal (Study 3) differed during the first testing. Differences in response latencies and psychophysiological arousal diminished during the second testing, whereas ratings did not change. The results are discussed in terms of implicit methods as measurements for cognitive dissonance and in terms of prevention and intervention programs. [less ▲]

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See detailBeyond fear appeals: Contradicting positive smoking outcome expectancies to influence smokers' implicit attitudes, perception, and behavior.
Glock, Sabine UL; Unz, Dagmar; Kovacs, Carrie UL

in Addictive Behaviors (2012), 37

Smokers often have (implicit or explicit) positive smoking outcome expectancies that motivate them to smoke. For instance, they may feel that smoking is relaxing, that it improves concentration, or that ... [more ▼]

Smokers often have (implicit or explicit) positive smoking outcome expectancies that motivate them to smoke. For instance, they may feel that smoking is relaxing, that it improves concentration, or that it is seen as cool and attractive by peers. These expectations are, for the most part, illusory. In order to counteract these expectations, we designed cigarette package warning labels that contradicted common positive outcome expectancies. We investigated the effectiveness of our new warning labels in two experiments. We first measured smokers' implicit attitudes toward smoking using an affective priming method and found that our new warning labels changed positive attitudes into ambivalent attitudes. We then tested whether our warning labels changed smokers' self-reported positive outcome expectancies and smoking behavior. Smokers presented with the new warning labels immediately associated positive outcome expectancies less strongly with smoking and reported smoking fewer cigarettes in the 24 hours following the experiment. Explicitly taking the reasons for unhealthy behavior into account when trying to change people's habits could offer a valuable contribution to effective health campaigns. [less ▲]

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See detailDefending the Doomed: Implicit Strategies concerning Protection of First Person Shooter Games
Kneer, Julia; Munko, Daniel; Glock, Sabine UL et al

in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking (2012), 15

Abstract Censorship of violent digital games, especially first-person shooter (FPS) games, is broadly discussed between generations. While older people are concerned about possible negative influences of ... [more ▼]

Abstract Censorship of violent digital games, especially first-person shooter (FPS) games, is broadly discussed between generations. While older people are concerned about possible negative influences of these games, not only players but also nonplayers of the younger net-generation seem to deny any association with real aggressive behavior. Our study aimed at investigating defense mechanisms players and nonplayers use to defend FPS and peers with playing habits. By using a lexical decision task, we found that aggressive concepts are activated by priming the content of FPS but suppressed afterward. Only if participants were instructed to actively suppress aggressive concepts after priming, thought suppression was no longer necessary. Young people still do have negative associations with violent video games. These associations are neglected by implicitly applying defense strategies—independent of own playing habits—to protect this specific hobby, which is common for the netgeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailImpression formation or prediction? Category fit and task influence forensic person memory.
Glock, Sabine UL; Kneer, Julia; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

in Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice (2011), 11

We experimentally investigated whether forensic psychologists differ from laymen in their use of heuristic and integrated information processing depending on the given task and category fit of information ... [more ▼]

We experimentally investigated whether forensic psychologists differ from laymen in their use of heuristic and integrated information processing depending on the given task and category fit of information. Participants’ task was either forming an impression or predicting the development of a fictitious rapist and a fictitious robber-and-murderer. Case report recall was measured. Results showed that experts processed the rapist’s information heuristically when offender information fit the category and the task required impression formation. In contrast, laymen did not apply the offender categories and processed all the information using an integrated strategy. When predicting the development of an offender, forensic psychologists integrated all relevant information. The robber-and-murderer information was always processed using an integrated strategy. The practical relevance of the results is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRauchen macht einsam“ und „Rauchen erhöht den Stress“ als Warnhinweise reduzieren den Zigarettenkonsum.
Glock, Sabine UL

in Zeitschrift für Sozialmanagement = Journal of Social Management (2011), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (4 UL)