References of "Fletcher, Denise Elaine 50001794"
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See detailFamily and Enterprise
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Carter, Sara; Jones-Evans, Dylan (Eds.) Enterprise and Small Business: principles, practice and policy (2006)

This chapter provides a review of the different approaches that have been utilised to examine the link between family and enterprise. Definitional issues are addressed, as are rationalist and ‘systems’ ... [more ▼]

This chapter provides a review of the different approaches that have been utilised to examine the link between family and enterprise. Definitional issues are addressed, as are rationalist and ‘systems’ ways of evaluating the relationship between family and enterprise. Criticism is made of the effects of rationalist thinking on studies of family businesses which have tended to create duality and polarity in our understanding of the family-enterprise relationship. It is argued that a developmental and integrated view of family and enterprise is more useful for understanding the specific transactions linking the institutions of ‘economy’ and ‘family’. A range of approaches and theories that are being used to examine the integration of family and enterprise/business activities are outlined. The chapter concludes with a discussion of interpretive inquiry and its potential benefits or uses in explaining how family and enterprise issues ‘come together’ in small business creation and development. [less ▲]

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See detailEntrepreneurial processes and the social construction of opportunity
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Entrepreneurship and Regional Development (2006), 18(5), 421-440

In contrast to structurally-determinist and cognitive/agency oriented views of opportunity recognition, it is argued that opportunity formation is relationally and communally constituted - an insight that ... [more ▼]

In contrast to structurally-determinist and cognitive/agency oriented views of opportunity recognition, it is argued that opportunity formation is relationally and communally constituted - an insight that is not recognised in descriptive or linear process models of opportunity recognition. To arrive at this claim, use is made of social constructionist ideas. These ideas have been frequently applied in entrepreneurship studies but less attention has been given to the relational aspects of social constructionist thinking particularly with regard to opportunity formation processes. To aid this line of inquiry an analysis is undertaken of a sibling-autobiographical account of a high profile business venture, Coffee Republic. This account has been crafted by the sibling partnership with a particular audience in mind (the would-be entrepreneur) with guidelines and principles on how ‘anyone can do it’. However, it is not utilised here as a good specimen of business venturing to be probed for particular (hidden) meanings. Instead, the account is evaluated in order to illustrate how individualistic statements about opportunity discovery can be reconceptualised as relationally and communally constituted - an emphasis which is important for widening our theoretical understanding of the activities we label entrepreneurship. [less ▲]

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See detailInternational entrepreneurship and the small business
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Entrepreneurship and Regional Development (2004), 16

The topic of ‘international entrepreneurship’ is becoming increasingly popular with researchers concerned with examining how international and entrepreneurial activities intersect when people in ... [more ▼]

The topic of ‘international entrepreneurship’ is becoming increasingly popular with researchers concerned with examining how international and entrepreneurial activities intersect when people in organizations engage in pro-active brokering and risk-taking behaviour in cross-border contexts. Some caution is needed in over-generalizing the meaning and significance of international entrepreneurship – especially in relation to small businesses. Not all entrepreneurial risk-taking, brokering and opportunity-seeking activities lead to internationalization (as the statistics on small business international activities indicate). This might suggest then that the only truly internationally entrepreneurial firms are those that are ‘born global’. However, their entrepreneurial activities are more ‘spatial’, concerned with what can be constructed again in relation to global markets rather than in relation to the local/regional context in which the business is located. For small firms that internationalize a few years after start-up (late starters), processes of international entrepreneurship are different. For ‘later starters’, international entrepreneurship is distinctive in that it is characterized by extending and modifying entrepreneurial understandings and practices that have been socially constructed in relation to the local and regional context in which the small firm is located. [less ▲]

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See detailInterpreneurship’: Organisational (re)emergence and entrepreneurial development in a second-generation family firm
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Research (2004), 10(1/2), 34-48

Although there has been some attention to how notions of entrepreneurship and family intersect in the life of family businesses, intensive analysis of these issues in relation to inter-generational and ... [more ▼]

Although there has been some attention to how notions of entrepreneurship and family intersect in the life of family businesses, intensive analysis of these issues in relation to inter-generational and organisational emergence in small family firms is underdeveloped. In order to redress this imbalance, it is important to undertake intensive analysis of entrepreneurial issues alongside those of family, ownership, management and inter-generational emergence. This is undertaken in this article using a biographical analysis of two second generation owner-managers and sons-in-law of the original founders of a small manufacturing company in the UK. Working with his younger brother-in-law, they are responsible for taking a small steeplejack company into its second/third generation and a new electrical engineering market. As the younger brother-in-law takes on an entrepreneurial role within the company and endeavours to develop new opportunities, the Chairman gives an account of the struggles involved in achieving a balance between ownership, management and family tensions. The notion of ‘interpreneurship’ whereby family members are interacting and creating new possibilities for themselves, their lives, their organizations whilst drawing upon past events, happenings, experiences and conversations that have gone before, is considered in the context of inter-generational (re) emergence. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding the Small Family Business
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

Book published by Routledge (2002)

This book is an edited collection of works by key family business scholars examining different aspects of the small family business

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See detailIn the Company of Men’: a reflexive tale of cultural organising in a small organisation
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Gender, Work and Organization (2002), 9(4), 65-76

A tale of fieldwork in a small organization is discussed in this article with a view to highlighting how social processes, cultural understandings and expressions of gender are produced during fieldwork ... [more ▼]

A tale of fieldwork in a small organization is discussed in this article with a view to highlighting how social processes, cultural understandings and expressions of gender are produced during fieldwork interaction. The tale is told reflexively and retrospectively, recording an ongoing conversation about fieldwork experience. Central to the tale is discussion of how the researcher is drawn into 'culture-making' within the organization and the ways in which fieldwork interaction creates a 'space' through which organizational members engage with, work through and realize workplace values. In this article there are multiple levels of reflection. At one level it is examined how the organizational-researcher role of 'emotional nurturer' was constructed during fieldwork. At the same time some cultural insights drawn from ethnographic inquiry and intensive interviewing within the small organization are presented. The analysis is also shaped by a further layer of post-fieldwork reflection and interpretation which draws in emotional issues and expressions of gender. It is argued that a close scrutiny of fieldwork roles is important to organizational research in that it makes explicit how the researcher-'native' interaction is central to the theorizing process and how the researcher can become a participant in organizational culture-making. [less ▲]

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See detail'Family' as a discursive resource for understanding the small family business
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Fletcher, Denise (Ed.) Understanding the small family business (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (2 UL)