References of "Fletcher, Denise Elaine 50001794"
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See detailEntrepreneurship, universities & resources
Hytti, Ulla; Blackburn, Robert; Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL et al

Book published by Edward Elgar (2016)

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See detailQualitative research practices and family business scholarship: a review and future research agenda
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; de Massis, Alfredo; Nordqvist, Matthias

in Journal of Family Business Strategy (2016), 7(1), 8-25

In spite of various calls for a wider application of qualitative research in the family business field, it is our contention that the full potential of qualitative inquiry is not being fully realized ... [more ▼]

In spite of various calls for a wider application of qualitative research in the family business field, it is our contention that the full potential of qualitative inquiry is not being fully realized. Part of the reason for this relates to the tendency to promote methods choice and diversity rather than addressing the foundational questions and processes which underlie qualitative research choices. These tendencies obscure attention to the reasons why researchers choose qualitative methods and the kinds of foundational issues about family businesses that are brought to light through qualitative research. To address this, we undertake an analysis of the most-cited articles using qualitative methods from an annotated bibliography of family business studies. From this, we identify the strengths and weaknesses of extant qualitative studies in family business research and argue for the need to re-orientate calls in family business research towards the foundational questions (rather than methods) that underline qualitative inquiry. [less ▲]

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See detailFind your passion: Developing Entrepreneurial Behaviours
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Geraudel, Mickaël UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

Learning objectives: Reflect on and assess personal passions – ‘inner awesomeness’ Expand thinking around potential business opportunities related to personal passions Connect passion to skills as part of ... [more ▼]

Learning objectives: Reflect on and assess personal passions – ‘inner awesomeness’ Expand thinking around potential business opportunities related to personal passions Connect passion to skills as part of opportunity creation Discuss your passions and skills with other team members [less ▲]

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See detailA reflexive note on reflexivity: issues to think about for entrepreneurship research
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

Scientific Conference (2015, August)

In this presentation, I outline various arguments supporting the need for greater reflexivity in entrepreneurship research

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See detailHow does context become context: relating multiple contexts in entrepreneurial explanation
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Selden, Paul

Presentation (2015, August)

The issue of how to ‘theorise context’ remains largely implicit in entrepreneurship research.  This means that although there is an increasing receptiveness to the meaning, role and function of context ... [more ▼]

The issue of how to ‘theorise context’ remains largely implicit in entrepreneurship research.  This means that although there is an increasing receptiveness to the meaning, role and function of context, the search for different ways to make context a theoretical (rather than factual or referential) concept is still underdeveloped. In this article, we identify three dominant conceptions of context in entrepreneurship research and discuss the limitations they engender for theorizing context. These limitations relate to the spatial and/or temporal separation of context and action, and the spatio-temporal conflation of action and context. Next, we offer a first step in theorizing context from the perspective of relational thinking.  From this perspective, we explain how entrepreneurial processes emerge through the circular causality of action-context relationships. This relational conceptualization also enables an evaluation of how multiple contexts are related to the spatio-temporal specificities of actioned events [less ▲]

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See detailProfessional Development Workshop: Reflexive Entrepreneurship Studies
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Verduijn, Karen; Gartner, William

Scientific Conference (2015, August)

Our aim in this PDW is to: (1) Intensify reflection within the field by questioning and re-examining dominant assumptions and traditional ways of ‘knowing’ entrepreneurship. (2) Facilitate creative ... [more ▼]

Our aim in this PDW is to: (1) Intensify reflection within the field by questioning and re-examining dominant assumptions and traditional ways of ‘knowing’ entrepreneurship. (2) Facilitate creative connections, provoke debate, develop conceptual resources. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat can critical entrepreneurship teaching offer to students when all they want is effectuation
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

Presentation (2015, May 26)

In this presentation, I consider what 'critical entrepreneurship' thinking and concepts can bring to entrepreneurship education. A summary of a review of 55 articles using the words 'critical' and ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, I consider what 'critical entrepreneurship' thinking and concepts can bring to entrepreneurship education. A summary of a review of 55 articles using the words 'critical' and 'entrepreneurship' is provided and a categorization of how critical notions are applied in entrepreneurship is outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailThe entrepreneurial journey as an emergent hierarchical system of artifact-creating processes
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Selden, Paul

in Journal of Business Venturing (2015), 30(4), 603-615

Entrepreneurial ‘process’ perspectives explain the events of an entrepreneurial journey in terms of mechanisms, such as ‘effectual logic’, ‘bricolage’, ‘dynamic creation’, ‘opportunity tension’ and ... [more ▼]

Entrepreneurial ‘process’ perspectives explain the events of an entrepreneurial journey in terms of mechanisms, such as ‘effectual logic’, ‘bricolage’, ‘dynamic creation’, ‘opportunity tension’ and ‘enactment’. Process theorists, however, have not as yet developed an analytical framework that explains an entrepreneurial event in relation to the entrepreneurial journey as the unit of analysis. Building on Sarasvathy’s (2003 and 2008) and Venkataraman et al’s (2012) conception of entrepreneurship as a science of the artificial (Simon, 1996), we explain how this research gap can be addressed by conceptualizing the entrepreneurial journey as an emergent hierarchical system of entrepreneurial artifact-creating processes. From this perspective, entrepreneurial events can be explained in relation to the endogenous dynamics of prior patterns of artifact emergence. We discuss some research implications of focusing on artifact emergence as the unit of analysis in process theory development. [less ▲]

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See detailIn What Ways is Qualitative Research Vital to Family Business Scholarship? A Review of Past Trends and Planning for New Futures
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; deMassis, Alfredo; Nordqvist, Mattias

Scientific Conference (2014, July)

In spite of various calls for the application of more qualitative methodologies in family business research, it is our contention that qualitative methodologies are underutilized in family business ... [more ▼]

In spite of various calls for the application of more qualitative methodologies in family business research, it is our contention that qualitative methodologies are underutilized in family business research. This is evidenced by reference to an annotated bibliography of family business studies which demonstrates not only the dominance of quantitative methods but also a preponderance of multiple-case studies as the most commonly-used qualitative research tool. Our study discusses the kinds of research questions and topics being addressed through qualitative methods, as well as how different qualitative methods are being used in extant family business research. From this, we identify key features that are occurring in the usage of qualitative methods as well as gaps in methodologies not being applied. It is argued that qualitative methods have much to offer than is currently being exploited in family business research and some suggestions are made for new avenues of qualitative research that can take account of contextual factors, processes unfolding over time, meaning-making, the interpretation of interpretation, sense-making, situated actions, discursive positions, interactions or relationality of family dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailFamily business inquiry as a critical social science
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Melin, Leif; Nordqvist, Mathias; Sharma, Pramodita (Eds.) The Sage Handbook of Family Business (2014)

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See detail‘I’ll show them who’s boss’: A critical analysis of a television consultancy
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

Scientific Conference (2013, July)

This article examines how a media activity in the form of a BBC television programme, ‘I’ll show them whose boss’, constitutes a ‘discursive intervention’ into the lives and relationships of four family ... [more ▼]

This article examines how a media activity in the form of a BBC television programme, ‘I’ll show them whose boss’, constitutes a ‘discursive intervention’ into the lives and relationships of four family businesses. It is argued that in promoting the importance of ‘singular leadership’, the discursive intervention helps to create a context for action in relation to leadership involving a father-son owned business, a sibling partnership between three brothers, a cousin consortium with eighteen family members, and an inter-generational business involving two couples. In showing the intermixing of public-private, home and work in the programme, the discursive strategies and positionings in relation to leadership selection are portrayed. Although the idea of singular leadership is accepted in some of the businesses, processes of distributed leadership are also very relevant for understanding the influences and means through which leadership occurs in family firms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe promise of relational modes of inquiry for entrepreneurship research
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Selden, Paul

Scientific Conference (2013, March)

In this presentation, we review some of the diverse analytical strategies used to advance relational thinking in studies of management, organization and entrepreneurship. As well as reviewing the ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, we review some of the diverse analytical strategies used to advance relational thinking in studies of management, organization and entrepreneurship. As well as reviewing the different research problems that various relational perspectives address, consideration is given to whether it is possible to distinguish some defining characteristics of relational thinking. Furthermore, the presentation examines whether relational thinking can be extended more fully into entrepreneurship inquiry to provide a stronger theoretical foundation for understanding action-contexts than is currently offered by perspectives privileging opportunity development, action-interaction, artificial science or effectuation. [less ▲]

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See detailEntrepreneurship and Institutional change
Kalantaridis, Christos; Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Entrepreneurship and Regional Development (2012), 24(3-4), 199-216

This article introduces a Special Issue on the theme of Entrepreneurship and Institutional Change. Drawing upon the accumulated literature and three original contributions it aims to explore the ... [more ▼]

This article introduces a Special Issue on the theme of Entrepreneurship and Institutional Change. Drawing upon the accumulated literature and three original contributions it aims to explore the conditions and the processes through which entrepreneurship may influence institutional change. The paper argues that entrepreneurs are not only influenced by the prevailing institution(s) but they can also influence (both intentionally and unintentionally) institutional change. This challenges prevailing views about the ability and effectiveness of the state to drive change. The article also outlines an agenda for future research into how entrepreneurship shapes emerging institutional arrangements. [less ▲]

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See detailCulture and values in Family Business – A review and suggestions for further research
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Melin, Leif; Gimeno, Albert

in Journal of Family Business Strategy (2012), 3/4

This article provides a review of key literature in the field of culture, values and family business by addressing three key questions. First, what is culture in a family business context and how can it ... [more ▼]

This article provides a review of key literature in the field of culture, values and family business by addressing three key questions. First, what is culture in a family business context and how can it be defined and conceptualized? Second, what can culture do for the family business? And third, which factors or attributes shape culture in family business? The article presents several suggestions for future research and previews the four articles included in the special issue on culture and values in family businesses. [less ▲]

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See detailA curiosity for contexts: entrepreneurship, enactive research and auto ethnography’: an essay for Bengt Johannisson
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Entrepreneurship and Regional Development (2012), 1/2

Long before the current vogue for acknowledging contexts and contextualisation processes in the research process, Johannisson’s pioneering scholarship provoked different conceptual and methodological ... [more ▼]

Long before the current vogue for acknowledging contexts and contextualisation processes in the research process, Johannisson’s pioneering scholarship provoked different conceptual and methodological experimentations that were oriented to context. Bengt’s unceasing curiosity for understanding how particular localities, communities, networks, industrial districts, regions and families produce, embed and enact entrepreneurial activities, is testament to his belief in the importance of the ‘organising context’ for entrepreneurship. In this essay, I discuss how Bengt’s theoretical and methodological sensitivity to context has provided a strong legacy for the entrepreneurship field, not least because it has opened up possibilities for innovative research methodologies that locate the researcher as situated actor but also because it emphasises participative and relational forms of entrepreneurial action that reduce self-other boundaries. [less ▲]

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See detail‘Life-making or risk taking’?:
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in International Small Business Journal (2010), 28(5), 1-17

When discussing couples involved in small businesses, many commentaries portray romanticised ‘in love-in business’ accounts of couples working together on entrepreneurial projects. Little is known ... [more ▼]

When discussing couples involved in small businesses, many commentaries portray romanticised ‘in love-in business’ accounts of couples working together on entrepreneurial projects. Little is known, however, about the ways in which venture creation is constructed between co-habiting couples. Neither is it reported, except for negative conceptions of ‘life-style’ businesses, how co-habiting couples negotiate their life-making aspirations with risk-taking activities associated with business venturing. In this article, field work material is drawn from 26 co-preneurial situations to develop a typology of co-preneurship using ownership and management structural dimensions. This typology is illustrated with different types of life style businesses to demonstrate the various ways in which work and personal relationships are organised around a small business. Consideration is also given to the economic assessments and ‘market work’ that give rise to family entrepreneurship. This focus is important for taking account of the increasing numbers of couples who combine their skills and labour with a spouse or co-habiting partner in order to develop or (re-position an existing) business venture. [less ▲]

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See detailA review of the educational and support infrastructure for family business in the United Kingdom
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy (2010), 30(7/8), 440-456

In this article, a review of the educational and support infrastructure for UK family firms is undertaken in order to further raise the profile/challenges and support needs of family firms in the UK. This ... [more ▼]

In this article, a review of the educational and support infrastructure for UK family firms is undertaken in order to further raise the profile/challenges and support needs of family firms in the UK. This is important because family firms are a very significant empirical phenomenon but the educational and policy support infrastructure that addresses the specific educational and support needs of small family firms in the UK, is still emergent. Furthermore, perceptions about nepotism and concerns about limited career possibilities mean that it is sometimes difficult for small/family businesses to recruit high calibre staff. Much work has to be done to address the negative perception that family firms have as employers and to recognise the complexity of social forms of organisation involving families. This situation sits in sharp contrast to the United States where family business interests have a very strong curriculum presence, with many endowed chairs, family business programmes and networks/associations dedicated to promoting these interests. [less ▲]

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See detailVoice, silence and the business of construction:
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; Watson, Tony

in Organization (2007), 14(2), 155-174

An ethnographically based narrative about the interactions and relationships of people involved with a small construction business is used to examine the interplay of voice and silence in organisations in ... [more ▼]

An ethnographically based narrative about the interactions and relationships of people involved with a small construction business is used to examine the interplay of voice and silence in organisations in a way which goes beyond some of the limitations of recent work on this topic. In place of the current literature’s emphasis on the motives behind individuals’ speaking up or staying quiet, a relational analysis is developed which gives full recognition to the emergent, day-to-day routine and contextual aspects of organisation. The lives and relationships of a set of characters in a small building company are portrayed and their voices heard. There are loud voices, quiet voices and silences, all of which play a part in the way these people deal with the everyday realities of small communities, family life and organisational power [less ▲]

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See detail‘Toy Story’: the narrative world of entrepreneurship
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Journal of Business Venturing (2007), 22(5), 649-672

Anyone involved in entrepreneurial learning, teaching and research will be aware of the power of a good story about business venturing. The continuous supply of personal stories and accounts of business ... [more ▼]

Anyone involved in entrepreneurial learning, teaching and research will be aware of the power of a good story about business venturing. The continuous supply of personal stories and accounts of business venturing in bookshops, airport lounges, the business press, television dramas or documentary programmes is evidence of the popular readership of entrepreneurial topics sometimes inspiring people to ‘have a go’ for themselves. But narrative accounts are often maligned in entrepreneurship studies for their anecdotal character and inability to say anything significant beyond the person telling their personal story. In this article, the benefits of a narrative style of inquiry for entrepreneurship studies are considered. This is done with reference to the Marvel Mustang account of business venturing. By relating to narrative and reader response theory, consideration is given to the function that the (Marvel Mustang) text has for the reader and how the reader (and not the text) is the key source of meaning about the practices we associate with entrepreneurship. In taking this emphasis, it is possible to understand the processes that facilitate the ‘stretching away’ of little entrepreneurial stories into transforming relations that go beyond the producer of the story and which ‘pull in’ or connect other people that are unrelated to the story. Narrative analysis helps inquirers to move beyond the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of entrepreneurship and to be able to answer theoretically ‘why’ such processes migrate and stretch across different cultures and contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailEntrepreneurship, Management Learning and Negotiated Narratives: 'Making it otherwise for us-otherwise for them''
Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL; watson, tony

in Management Learning (2007), 38(1), 9-26

A dialogic and drama-like narrative is presented. This has resulted from an unexpected circumstance in which a business idea is seen to emerge. This narrative provides a valuable resource for a ... [more ▼]

A dialogic and drama-like narrative is presented. This has resulted from an unexpected circumstance in which a business idea is seen to emerge. This narrative provides a valuable resource for a ‘negotiated narrative’ style of entrepreneurship management learning and it is used to contribute to the theoretical understanding of entrepreneurship itself and to the production of a novel way of conceptualizing entrepreneurial processes generally. Emphasis is given to the emergent and relational processes through which learning occurs and through which entrepreneurial opportunities are realized. Entrepreneurship can thus be seen as a matter of entrepreneurial actors relationally ‘becoming otherwise’ through enabling customers or clients to ‘become otherwise’. [less ▲]

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