References of "De Bres, Julia 50001482"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detail‘I learnt English – the wrong thing, eh’ – power, interests and language practices among cross-border workers in Luxembourg
Franziskus, Anne UL; De Bres, Julia UL; Gilles, Peter UL

in Koff, Harlan; Schulz, Christian; Gilles, Peter (Eds.) Theorising Power through Analyses of Border Relationships (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 168 (15 UL)
See detailGrensarbeiders, meertaligheid en het gebruik van Luxemburgs op het werk in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne UL

in De Internationalisering van de Vlaamse Rand Rond Brussel [Internationalisation of the Periphery of Brussels] (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (8 UL)
See detailLes pratiques linguistiques des frontaliers au Luxembourg: focalisation sur leur utilisation du luxembourgeois
Franziskus, Anne UL; De Bres, Julia UL

in Belkacem, Rachid; Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle (Eds.) Le travail frontalier au sein de la Grande Région Saar-Lor-Lux: pratiques, enjeux et perspectives (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (14 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInterkulturelle Arbeitswelten in Luxemburg. Mehrsprachigkeit und kulturelle Vielfalt am Arbeitsplatz von Grenzgängern
Wille, Christian UL; De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne UL

in Interculture journal : Online-Zeitschrift für interkulturelle Studien (2012), 11(17), 73-91

Luxemburg zählt die meisten Grenzgänger in der EU. Sie pendeln täglich aus Deutschland, Frankreich oder Belgien in das dreisprachige Land ein, womit sich vielfältige sprachliche und kulturelle ... [more ▼]

Luxemburg zählt die meisten Grenzgänger in der EU. Sie pendeln täglich aus Deutschland, Frankreich oder Belgien in das dreisprachige Land ein, womit sich vielfältige sprachliche und kulturelle Konstellationen der Zusammenarbeit ergeben. Der Beitrag untersucht erstmals derart facettenreich, wie Mehrsprachigkeit und Interkulturalität von Grenzgängern in Luxemburg erlebt und bewältigt werden. Die vorgestellten Sprachpraktiken und Interkulturalitätsstrategien basieren auf Interviews, Interaktionsanalysen und Befragungen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 496 (18 UL)
See detailLes pratiques linguistiques des frontaliers au Luxembourg: focalisation sur leur utilisation du luxembourgeois
Franziskus, Anne UL; De Bres, Julia UL

in Belkacem, Rachid; Pigeron, Isabelle (Eds.) Le travail frontalier : pratiques, enjeux et perspectives (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (10 UL)
See detailLes frontaliers du Luxembourg. Représentations négatives et stratégies de réponse
De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne UL

in Koukoutsaki-Monnier, Angeliki (Ed.) Proceedings of conference ‘Représentations du transfrontalier’, 16-17 septembre 2010, Mulhouse, France (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (6 UL)
See detailEthnicity and humour in the workplace
Holmes, Janet; De Bres, Julia UL

in Handford, Michael; Gee, James Paul (Eds.) Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 155 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA review of research on the attitudes of non-Maori New Zealanders towards the Maori language
De Bres, Julia UL

in New Zealand Studies in Applied Linguistics (2011), 17(2), 5-19

2010 marked ten years of the New Zealand government monitoring the attitudes of New Zealanders, both Māori and non-Māori, towards the Māori language. Academic researchers have been undertaking similar ... [more ▼]

2010 marked ten years of the New Zealand government monitoring the attitudes of New Zealanders, both Māori and non-Māori, towards the Māori language. Academic researchers have been undertaking similar research for a much longer period. This article reviews the main findings of research on attitudes towards the Māori language among non-Māori in particular since the 1980s, and considers to what extent recent government surveys show evidence of change in the attitudes of New Zealand’s non-indigenous population towards the country’s indigenous language. The article concludes that work undertaken to date provides us with many insights into attitudes towards the Māori language, but further research is required to determine whether and how such attitudes are changing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPromoting the Māori language to non-Māori: evaluating the New Zealand government’s approach
De Bres, Julia UL

in Language Policy (2011), (10), 361-376

New Zealand’s main government Māori language planning agencies, the Māori Language Commission and the Ministry of Māori Development, have engaged for some time in language planning targeting the attitudes ... [more ▼]

New Zealand’s main government Māori language planning agencies, the Māori Language Commission and the Ministry of Māori Development, have engaged for some time in language planning targeting the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders. This activity is based on the belief that the attitudes and behaviours of majority language speakers exert an important influence on the health of minority languages. To date, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of this approach. This article examines the official policy and practice of the two agencies in this regard and evaluates their effectiveness, in terms of both internal factors and external responses. Based on this analysis, points for improvement and potentially effective future directions are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailKia ora matua: Humour and the Maori language in the workplace
De Bres, Julia UL; Holmes, Janet; Marra, Meredith et al

in Journal of Asian Pacific Communication (2010), 20(1), 46-68

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAttitudes of non-Maori New Zealanders towards the use of Maori in New Zealand English
De Bres, Julia UL

in New Zealand English Journal (2010), 24

As majority language speakers have an important impact on minority languages, the the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language are likely to have an influence on ... [more ▼]

As majority language speakers have an important impact on minority languages, the the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language are likely to have an influence on Māori language regeneration (de Bres 2008). Moreover, as the presence of Māori words is arguably the most distinctive feature of New Zealand English (Deverson 1991, Macalister 2005), these attitudes and behaviours are also likely to influence aspects of New Zealand English. Although there is now considerable research on attitudes towards the Māori language in New Zealand, there has been less research on attitudes towards the use of Māori in the context of New Zealand English in particular. This article reports on the results of research on the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language, focusing on two behaviours specifically relating to the use of Māori in New Zealand English, namely the use of Māori words and phrases and the pronunciation of Māori words. The results are considered from the dual perspective of what they tell us about the attitudes of non-Māori towards the Māori language in a context of language regeneration, and what they might imply for the future development of New Zealand English. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 273 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPromoting a minority language to majority language speakers: television advertising about the Maori language targeting non-Maori New Zealanders
De Bres, Julia UL

in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development (2010), 31(6), 515-529

It has been claimed that the success of minority language policy initiatives may only be achievable if at least some degree of ‘tolerability’ of these initiatives is secured among majority language ... [more ▼]

It has been claimed that the success of minority language policy initiatives may only be achievable if at least some degree of ‘tolerability’ of these initiatives is secured among majority language speakers (May 2000). There has, however, been little consideration in the language planning literature of what practical approaches might be used to influence the attitudes of majority language speakers towards minority languages, that is to ‘plan for tolerability’. This article considers the approach taken in two recent television advertisements that address the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language. It begins by examining the discursive approach taken in these advertisements, the attitudinal messages they convey about the Māori language, and the behaviours they propose for non-Māori New Zealanders. The article then discusses the responses of eighty non-Māori viewers of the advertisements, considering the extent to which they perceived the intended messages of the advertisements, and how their responses were influenced by their existing attitudes towards the Māori language. On this basis, the article assesses the potential effectiveness of using language promotion materials as a means of planning for the tolerability of the Māori language among non-Māori New Zealanders. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 161 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe behaviours of non-Maori New Zealanders towards the Maori language
De Bres, Julia UL

in Te Reo (2009), 52

When majority language speakers are referred to in minority language planning, it is generally in relation to their ‘attitudes’. It is not just the attitudes of majority language speakers that impact on ... [more ▼]

When majority language speakers are referred to in minority language planning, it is generally in relation to their ‘attitudes’. It is not just the attitudes of majority language speakers that impact on minority languages, however, but also their behaviours. Accordingly, ‘planning for tolerability’ ([author’s name] 2008a) targets both the attitudes and behaviours of majority language speakers towards minority languages. This article addresses the little-considered question of what behaviours non-Māori New Zealanders might adopt to support Māori language regeneration. An analysis of New Zealand government Māori language policy and the questionnaire and interview responses of eighty non-Māori New Zealanders reveals that, while the government’s position on ‘desired behaviours’ for non-Māori is unclear at best, non-Māori New Zealanders have a wide range of such behaviours in mind. The extent to which these non-Māori are willing to engage in these behaviours is a complex matter, influenced both by their own attitudes towards the Māori language and by other factors. These results have suggestive implications for the future development of Māori language planning targeting non-Māori, but leave open a further question: whether the behaviours identified are those that Māori New Zealanders might themselves desire from non-Māori. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailLanguage in the Workplace Project and Workplace Communication for Skilled Migrants course at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
De Bres, Julia UL; Holmes, Janet; Joe, Angela et al

in Language Teaching (2009), 42(4), 519-524

Detailed reference viewed: 140 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlanning for tolerability in New Zealand, Wales and Catalonia
De Bres, Julia UL

in Current Issues in Language Planning (2008), 9(4), 464-482

The attitudes and behaviours of majority language speakers have an important impact on minority languages, and it has been claimed that the long-term success of minority language initiatives may only be ... [more ▼]

The attitudes and behaviours of majority language speakers have an important impact on minority languages, and it has been claimed that the long-term success of minority language initiatives may only be achievable if some degree of favourable opinion, or ‘tolerability’, of these initiatives is secured among majority language speakers (May 2000a). Once the problem of tolerability has been recognised in a minority language situation, however, how can language planners address it? The literature has tended to concentrate on the theoretical arguments that need to be conveyed to majority language speakers in order to improve the tolerability of minority languages. In contrast there has been little consideration of what practical language policy approaches can be used to ‘plan for tolerability’. An analysis of recent language regeneration policy in New Zealand, Wales and Catalonia reveals that planning for tolerability is in fact currently occurring in all of these language situations. This article examines the various approaches taken, focusing on five features of planning for tolerability: recognising the problem; defining the target audience; developing messages and desired behaviours; selecting policy techniques; and evaluating success. Given this growing policy activity, the article concludes that planning for tolerability deserves more attention from researchers and policymakers than it has received to date. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 120 (2 UL)
See detailUsing workplaces to research attitudes and behaviours towards the Maori language in Wellington
De Bres, Julia UL

in Wellington Working Papers in Linguistics (2007), 19

This research report discusses the workplace-based methodological design and selected findings of my PhD research on the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language. A ... [more ▼]

This research report discusses the workplace-based methodological design and selected findings of my PhD research on the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language. A participant recruitment approach at nine white-collar workplaces in Wellington was used to attempt to access non-Māori participants with a range of attitudes towards the Māori language. Although this workplace-based design was mainly intended to facilitate access to a range of participants, the data collection also resulted in a number of findings relating to Māori language in the workplace in particular. This report discusses a selection of these findings, including the association between participants’ workplaces and their attitudes towards the Māori language, participants’ stated behaviours towards the Māori language at work (including pronunciation of Māori words, using Māori words and phrases, and responding to the use of Māori by others) and participants’ views on how their workplace environment constrains and/or fosters their Māori language use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaori lexical items in the mainstream television news in New Zealand
De Bres, Julia UL

in New Zealand English Journal (2006), 20

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (1 UL)
See detailIntergenerational attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance in New Zealand
De Bres, Julia UL

in Wellington Working Papers in Linguistics (2004), 16

This paper discusses the results of an exploratory study undertaken to investigate changes in individual and societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance across three periods of arrival in New ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses the results of an exploratory study undertaken to investigate changes in individual and societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance across three periods of arrival in New Zealand from the 1950s to the present. Eleven representatives of Dutch families of three different periods of arrival in New Zealand completed a written questionnaire enquiring about their level of Dutch proficiency, patterns of language use, and their attitudes and perceptions of societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance in New Zealand in the past and present. An analysis of the resulting data suggests that although intergenerational language shift has so far occurred at a similar rate across periods of arrival, individual and societal attitudes towards Dutch language maintenance are more positive today than in the 1950s, and these changes in attitude may impact on the degree of Dutch language maintenance in New Zealand. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (1 UL)