References of "De Beaufort, Carine 50001475"
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See detailTrends in the incidence of childhood onset diabetes in Europe. 1989-1998
Green, A.; Patterson, C.C.; De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Diabetologia (2001), 44(3), 3-8

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To study the epidemiology of childhood-onset (Type I) insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europe, the EURODIAB collaborative group in 1988 established prospective, geographically ... [more ▼]

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To study the epidemiology of childhood-onset (Type I) insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europe, the EURODIAB collaborative group in 1988 established prospective, geographically-defined registers of all children diagnosed with Type I diabetes under 15 years of age. This report is based on 24,423 children, registered by 36 centres, with complete participation during the period 1989-1998 and representing most European countries with a population coverage of approximately 20 million children. METHODS: Multiple sources of ascertainment were used to validate the level of ascertainment. Trends in Type I diabetes incidence during the period were analysed using Poisson regression with the results from the 36 centres pooled into nine regions. RESULTS: The standardised average annual incidence rate of Type I diabetes varied more than tenfold between centres. Overall, the annual increase in incidence was 3.2% (95%-CI: 2.7%, 3.7%), being highest for children in the 0-4-year age-group 4.8% (3.8%, 5.9%) and lowest for children in the 10-14-year age group 2.1 % (1.4%, 2.8%). However, the absolute increases in Type I diabetes were roughly similar in the three age-groups of 0-4, 5-9 and 10-14 years. Central Eastern Europe showed the highest increase whereas Sardinia and Northern Europe (except Finland) showed no evidence of an increase. For all age-groups relatively fewer cases had disease onset during the summer months, especially the 10-14-year age-group. CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: The extremely large range of incidence rates within Europe has been confirmed. The incidence rate is generally increasing but is more pronounced in some regions than in others. Seasonality at disease onset is apparent even in the youngest age-group. [less ▲]

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See detailIs childhood onset type1 diabetes a wealth-related disease. An ecological analysis of European incidence rates
Patterson, C.C.; Dahlquist, G.; Soltesz, G. et al

in Diabetologia (2001), 44

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See detailThe Eurodiab Substudy 2 study group. Infections and vaccinations as risk factors for childhood type1(insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus: a multicentre case control investigation
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Diabetologia (2000), 43

Aims/hypothesis. To determine if vaccinations and infections are associated with the subsequent risk of Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood. Method. Seven centres in Europe with ... [more ▼]

Aims/hypothesis. To determine if vaccinations and infections are associated with the subsequent risk of Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood. Method. Seven centres in Europe with access to population-based registers of children with Type I diabetes diagnosed under 15 years of age participated in a case-control study of environmental risk factors. Control children were chosen at random in each centre either from population registers or from schools and policlinics. Data on maternal and neonatal infections, common childhood infections and vaccinations were obtained for 900 cases and 2302 control children from hospital and clinic records and from parental responses to a questionnaire or interview. Results. Infections early in the child's life noted in the hospital record were found to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes, although the odds ratio of 1.61 (95% confidence limits 1.11, 2.33) was significant only after adjustment for confounding variables. None of the common childhood infectious diseases was found to be associated with diabetes and neither was there evidence that any common childhood vaccination modified the risk of diabetes. Pre-school day-care attendance, a proxy measure for total infectious disease exposure in early childhood, was found, however, to be inversely associated with diabetes, with a pooled odds ratio of 0.59 (95% confidence limits 0.46, 0.76) after adjustment for confounding variables. Conclusion/interpretation. It seems likely that the explanation for these contrasting findings of an increased risk associated with perinatal infections coupled with a protective effect of pre-school day care lies in the age-dependent modifying influence of infections on the developing immune system [less ▲]

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See detailDiaphragmatic hernia and Fryns syndrome phenotype in partial trisomy 22
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Schneider, F.; Chafai, R. et al

in Genetic Counseling (2000), 11(2), 181-182

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See detailDecreased prevalence of atopic diseases in children with diabetes
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Journal of Pediatrics (2000), 137

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that atopic diseases in early life are associated with a reduced risk (protection) for the development of type 1 diabetes in childhood. STUDY DESIGN: European centers (n ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that atopic diseases in early life are associated with a reduced risk (protection) for the development of type 1 diabetes in childhood. STUDY DESIGN: European centers (n = 8) with access to population-based type 1 diabetes registries (>90% degree of ascertainment) participated in a case control study focusing on early exposures and risk factors for type 1 diabetes. Altogether, data from 1028 members of a case group and 2744 members of a control group corresponding to 85.4% eligible members of the case group and 76.1% of the control group were analyzed. Information in this study was collected regarding atopic diseases (atopic eczema, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma). RESULTS: Atopic disease and asthma particularly are associated with significant reductions in risk of childhood type 1 diabetes. The risk reduction associated with asthma was observed reasonably consistently among the 8 study centers, which represent a wide range of diabetes incidence. Risk reductions associated with all 3 expressions of atopy were particularly marked in children whose type 1 diabetes was diagnosed in the 10- to 14-year age group. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that atopic conditions may be protective against the development of type 1 diabetes and are consistent with the immunologic concept of T(H)1 (type 1 diabetes) and T(H)2 (atopy) diseases being mutually exclusive. [less ▲]

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See detailVariation and trends in incidence of childhood diabetes in Europe
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Lancet (2000), 355

BACKGROUND: To study the epidemiology of childhood-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes in Europe, the EURODIAB collaborative group established in 1988 prospective geographically-defined registers of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: To study the epidemiology of childhood-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes in Europe, the EURODIAB collaborative group established in 1988 prospective geographically-defined registers of new cases diagnosed under 15 years of age. This report is based on 16 362 cases registered during the period 1989-94 by 44 centres representing most European countries and Israel and covering a population of about 28 million children. METHODS: Multiple sources of ascertainment were used in most centres to validate the completeness of registration by the capture-recapture method. Trends in incidence during the period were analysed by Poisson regression, the data from centres within each country being pooled. FINDINGS: The standardised average annual incidence rate during the period 1989-94 ranged from 3.2 cases per 100000 per year in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to 40.2 cases per 100000 per year in two regions of Finland. By pooling over all centres, the annual rate of increase in incidence was 3.4% (95% CI 2.5-4.4%), but in some central European countries it was more rapid than this. Pooled over centres and sexes, the rates of increase were 6.3% (4.1-8.5%) for children aged 0-4 years, 3.1% (1.5-4.8%) for 5-9 years, and 2.4% (1.0-3.8%) for 10-14 years. INTERPRETATION: The results confirm a very wide range of incidence rates within Europe and show that the increase in incidence during the period varied from country to country. The rapid rate of increase in children aged under 5 years is of particular concern. PMID: 10752702 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLI [less ▲]

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See detailPerinatal risk factors for childhood type 1 diabetes in Europe. The EURODIAB Substudy 2 Study Group.
Dahlquist, G.G.; Patterson, C.; Soltesz, G. et al

in Diabetes Care (1999), 22(10), 1698-1702

OBJECTIVE: To explore whether perinatal factors are associated with the development of childhood type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied hospital records from 892 cases of childhood type ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To explore whether perinatal factors are associated with the development of childhood type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied hospital records from 892 cases of childhood type 1 diabetes compared with 2,291 population-based control subjects in seven study centers in Europe. RESULTS: In a pooled analysis incorporating stratification by center, we confirmed the previous findings that older maternal age, maternal preeclampsia, neonatal respiratory disease, and jaundice caused by blood group incompatibility are significant risk factors for type 1 diabetes, whereas being a firstborn child, having a low birth weight, or having a short birth length were protective. Cesarean section delivery and neonatal infectious diseases were not significantly associated with the risk of type 1 diabetes in this study. The strongest association was found for blood group incompatibility (AB0 and Rh factor) with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.96 (95% CI 1.88-4.65). AB0 incompatibility (OR = 3.92) was a more common and also a stronger risk factor than Rh incompatibility (OR = 1.62). The effect of AB0 blood group incompatibility was independent of treatment effects in logistical regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Different perinatal events are associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. The effect of maternal-child blood group incompatibility is strong and indicates a true effect that must be further explored. [less ▲]

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See detailThe EURODIAB Substudy 2 Study Group Vitamin D supplement in early childhood and risk for Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Diabetologia (1999), 42(1), 51-55

The initiation of the immunopathogenetic process that can lead to Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood probably occurs early in life. Studies in vitro have shown that vitamin D3 is ... [more ▼]

The initiation of the immunopathogenetic process that can lead to Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood probably occurs early in life. Studies in vitro have shown that vitamin D3 is immunosuppressive or immunomodulating and studies in experimental models of autoimmunity, including one for autoimmune diabetes, have shown vitamin D to be protective. Seven centres in Europe with access to population-based and validated case registers of insulin-dependent diabetes patients participated in a case-control study focusing on early exposures and risk of Type I diabetes. Altogether data from 820 patients and 2335 control subjects corresponding to 85% of eligible patients and 76% of eligible control subjects were analysed. Questions focused on perinatal events and early eating habits including vitamin D supplementation. The frequency of vitamin D supplementation in different countries varied from 47 to 97% among control subjects. Vitamin D supplementation was associated with a decreased risk of Type I diabetes without indication of heterogeneity. The Mantel-Haenszel combined odds ratio was 0.67 (95% confidence limits: 0.53, 0.86). Adjustment for the possible confounders: a low birth weight, a short duration of breast feeding, old maternal age and study centre in logistic regression analysis did not affect the significant protective effect of vitamin D. In conclusion, this large multicentre trial covering many different European settings consistently showed a protective effect of vitamin D supplementation in infancy. The findings indicate that activated vitamin D might contribute to immune modulation and thereby protect or arrest an ongoing immune process initiated in susceptible people by early environmental exposures. [less ▲]

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See detailHypoglycemia during intensified insulin therapy of young children
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism (1998), 11(1), 153-158

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See detailFamilial risk of type 1 diabetes in European children
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Diabetologia (1998), 41

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See detailEtude de differentes methodes pour la mise en evidence des autoanticorps anti-glutamate-decarboxylase associes au developpement du diabete insulinodependant
Humbel, R. L.; Guillaume, A. C.; Schmit, P. et al

in Immuno-Analyse et Biologie Specialisee (1997), 12(5), 275-279

Autoantibodies to glutamate-decarboxylase (GAD) are present in the serum of patients with insulin dependent diabetes (DID) even before the development of the overt diabetes. These antibodies react ... [more ▼]

Autoantibodies to glutamate-decarboxylase (GAD) are present in the serum of patients with insulin dependent diabetes (DID) even before the development of the overt diabetes. These antibodies react predominantly with the native GAD. Various methods have been studied (radio immunoassay [RIA] and enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]). It was observed that at the present time only RIA-tests, in which GAD is presented in fluid phase, are able to detect antibodies. [less ▲]

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See detailFluctuations in GAD65 antibodies after clinical diagnosis of IDDM in young children
Batstra, M. R.; Pina, M.; Quan, J. et al

in Diabetes Care (1997), 20(4), 642-644

OBJECTIVE - To investigate whether the presence of GAD antibodies at onset of IDDM correlates to a more aggressive rate of β-cell destruction after clinical onset. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We studied ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE - To investigate whether the presence of GAD antibodies at onset of IDDM correlates to a more aggressive rate of β-cell destruction after clinical onset. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We studied GAD antibodies at onset of disease, after 1 year, and after 6 years in 33 consecutively referred children (mean age 8.08, range 1.7-16.3). In a subset of 11 patients, GAD antibodies were studied very frequently. The correlation between GAD antibodies and clinical parameters, including glycosylated hemoglobin, residual insulin secretion, and insulin dosage, was evaluated. RESULTS - GAD antibody titers were highly variable. Four patients became GAD antibody positive weeks to years after clinical onset. Other patients switched between testing positive and negative for GAD antibodies shortly after clinical onset. No correlation was found between the presence of GAD antibodies and the rate of β-cell destruction, but patients with high GAD antibody indexes at onset had significantly higher glycosylated hemoglobin levels. CONCLUSIONS - GAD antibodies at clinical onset do not predict the rate of β-cell destruction in young children with newly diagnosed IDDM. The highly variable GAD antibody levels suggest variation of the autoimmune process. [less ▲]

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See detailMHC-genotyping of IDDM patients in Luxembourg. Evidence for a pediatric patient subgroup.
Hentges, F. R.; Michel, G. H.; Hoffmann, A. J. et al

in Bulletin de la Société des sciences médicales du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg (1996), 133(1), 5-12

[No abstract available]

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See detailA review of the recent epidemiological data on the worldwide incidence of type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetes mellitus
Karvonen, M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Libman, J. et al

in Diabetologia (1993), 36

Nearly 70 registries from more than 40 countries have collected and published incidence data of childhood Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus up to the end of the 1980s. The majority of incidence ... [more ▼]

Nearly 70 registries from more than 40 countries have collected and published incidence data of childhood Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus up to the end of the 1980s. The majority of incidence data comes from regions of high incidence i.e. from Europe and North America. All these published data facilitate the descriptive comparison of incidence and variation of the occurrence of Type 1 diabetes roughly throughout the northern hemisphere. The aim of this paper is to review and compare the most recent epidemiology data on the incidence of Type 1 diabetes among children under the age of 15 years. A clear difference in incidence appeared between northern and southern hemisphere with no countries below the equator having an incidence greater than 15.0 per 100,000. In contrast above the equator the disease is common. Between continents the variation in incidence showed that the lowest incidences were found in Asia, followed by Oceania (Australia and New Zealand), South and North America, and the highest rates were in Europe. The incidence varied from 0.6 per 100,000 in Korea and Mexico to 35.3 per 100,000 in Finland showing prominent worldwide variation in incidence of Type 1 diabetes. The largest intracontinental variation in incidence appeared in Europe, varying from the highest in Finland to the lowest (4.6 per 100,000) in northern Greece. The highest incidence in the world was in northern Europe, but within the continent scale there were some striking exceptions from the overall level of incidence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailUtilization of drug sales data for the epidemiology of chronic diseases: the example of diabetes
Papoz, L.; De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Epidemiology (1993), 4

An indirect method for estimating the prevalence rates of chronic diseases that are treated by specific drugs was proposed in 1988 to European countries in the framework of a European Community concerted ... [more ▼]

An indirect method for estimating the prevalence rates of chronic diseases that are treated by specific drugs was proposed in 1988 to European countries in the framework of a European Community concerted action on diabetes epidemiology. Data on consumption of antidiabetic drugs were collected at the national level in nine countries and at a regional level in two. Using official drug sales data and recent demographic data, we estimated the diabetes prevalence rates in each country or region. The estimated diabetes prevalence in Europe varied from 1.6% in Northern Ireland to 4.7% in Malta. In four countries that already had diabetes prevalence data, the estimation through drug consumption provided figures 3-20% lower than those from field surveys. This study showed a large variety of prescribing habits for diabetic patients in Europe (for example, the proportion of insulin-treated patients varies from 13% to 36%) and underscores the need for a consensus on antidiabetic treatments based on valid clinical research. The proposed approach does not replace field surveys but provides an inexpensive and practical marker of disease frequency and therapeutic attitudes over space and time. [less ▲]

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See detailInsulin autoantibodies and immune response to human insulin therapy in 24 type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic children: superiority of radio binding assay over solid phase assay
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Sodoyez, J. C.; Koch, M. et al

in Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice (1993), 21(1), 19-24

To evaluate the immunization pattern against human insulin, 24 newly diagnosed diabetic children (12 females, 12 males; mean age: 7 ± 4 years) were treated from diagnosis onwards with semisynthetic human ... [more ▼]

To evaluate the immunization pattern against human insulin, 24 newly diagnosed diabetic children (12 females, 12 males; mean age: 7 ± 4 years) were treated from diagnosis onwards with semisynthetic human insulin (NOVO). Informed consent was obtained from all parents. Blood samples were taken before, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after the start of therapy and, thereafter, at monthly intervals for 2 years. Insulin (auto) antibodies (I(A)A) were measured by radio binding assay (RBA) and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IAA, determined by RBA, were detected in eight children. Using ELISA, IgM IA were not detected after onset of therapy. By contrast, IgG IA were found in 8 children after 2 weeks of treatment and in 12 after 1 month. Using RBA, all children had IA after 2 months of therapy, whereas with ELISA, IA remained undetectable during the study period in 8 out of 24 patients. These results confirm previous observations suggesting that the 2 methods are not interchangeable and yield different estimations of the insulin immune reaction, not only before but also after the start of insulin therapy. In addition, the detection of IA by RBA in all treated patients unambiguously demonstrates that human insulin is immunogenic in man. © 1993. [less ▲]

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See detailIncidence of childhood-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: the EURODIAB ACE Study
Green, A.; Patterson, C.C.; Gale, E.A. et al

in Lancet (1992), 339(8798), 905-909

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See detailClinical and laboratory features of type 1 diabetic children at the time of diagnosis
Levy-Marchal, C.; Papoz, L.; De Beaufort, Carine UL et al

in Diabetic Medicine: A Journal of the British Diabetic Association (1992), 9

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See detailNicotinamid
De Beaufort, Carine UL

in Diabetes, prevention and therapy (1992), 6

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