References of "Caruso, Geoffrey 50001199"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEquilibrium and first-best city with endogenous exposure to local air pollution from traffic
Schindler, Mirjam UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Picard, Pierre M UL

in Regional Science and Urban Economics (2017), 62

Exposure to urban traffic-induced air pollution is a major health concern of cities. This paper analyzes the urban structure when localized pollution exposure arises from commuting traffic and ... [more ▼]

Exposure to urban traffic-induced air pollution is a major health concern of cities. This paper analyzes the urban structure when localized pollution exposure arises from commuting traffic and investigates the feedback effect of endogenous pollution on residential choices. The presence of stronger traffic-induced air pollution exposure reduces the geographical extent and the population of cities. Land rents fall with distance from the city center while population densities may be non-monotonic. Cleaner vehicle technologies reduce pollution exposure everywhere, increase population and density everywhere and do not affect the spatial extent of the city. The paper compares the urban equilibrium with the first-best. The first-best structure is a less expanded city with higher densities at the center and lower densities at the fringe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 224 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailGrenzüberschreitende Alltagspraktiken in der Großregion SaarLorLux
Wille, Christian UL; Pauly, Michel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

This paper examines everyday practices carried out by the inhabitants of Saarland, Lorraine, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Wallonia in neighbouring regions abroad. The key consideration here is ... [more ▼]

This paper examines everyday practices carried out by the inhabitants of Saarland, Lorraine, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Wallonia in neighbouring regions abroad. The key consideration here is that the Greater Region SaarLorLux can be defined as a cross-border reality of life based on the cross-border implementation of everyday practices of its inhabitants. In such a socio-constructivist perspective, it is not asked what the Greater Region SaarLorLux is, but in what ways it is constituted or how it manifests itself in the everyday life of its inhabitants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBicycle sharing system ‘success’ determinants
Médard de Chardon, Cyrille UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Thomas, Isabelle

in Transportation Research. Part A : Policy & Practice (2017), 100

Many municipalities assert bicycle sharing systems (BSS) as having many benefits, justifying their adoption, yet few explicitly state the purpose of their system making comparison or determination of ... [more ▼]

Many municipalities assert bicycle sharing systems (BSS) as having many benefits, justifying their adoption, yet few explicitly state the purpose of their system making comparison or determination of success impossible. In addition, the apprehension of many BSS operators to share data further hinders comparison. This paper estimates the number of daily trips from publicly available data for 75 BSS case studies across the world and provides trips per bike per day scores as a comparison of performance and success. Results reveal that a third of case studies have fewer than the psychologically important one trip per bicycle per day. To ascertain what factors are associated with this metric we estimate models with independent variables related to system attributes, station density, weather, geography and transportation infrastructure. Our analysis provides strong evidence undermining the ‘network effect’ promoted by influential BSS policy makers that expanding system size increases performance. Finally our results describe and discuss causal variables associated with higher BSS performance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailBee Species Richness in Europe
Schiel, Kerry UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Vereecken, Nicolas

Cartographic material (2017)

This map portfolio compares maps of bee species richness in Europe automatically aggregated per country from the IUCN Red List with national numbers obtained from various other sources.

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (17 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn agent-based model to simulate the feedback effect between traffic-induced air pollution and urban structure
Schindler, Mirjam UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2016, September 22)

A spatial complexity currently of increasing concern is the relation between the internal structure of urban areas and traffic‐induced air pollution. Urban air pollution has severe impacts on the ... [more ▼]

A spatial complexity currently of increasing concern is the relation between the internal structure of urban areas and traffic‐induced air pollution. Urban air pollution has severe impacts on the environment and on human health with traffic being its major source. Air pollution from traffic varies locally within the city depending on traffic patterns that arise from the spatial arrangement of land uses and subsequent travel demand across time. In this paper, we contribute a dynamic agent‐based residential model (ABM) applied to 2D theoretical space based on micro‐economic principles with local exposure and pollution externalities arising from car commuting traffic and an endogenous road network. We analyse the effects of households’ aversion to generating and being exposed to local traffic pollution on emerging land use patterns and pollution distribution. The focus is thereby set on endogenising local health but also global environmental concerns of traffic‐induced air pollution in location choice. The ABM framework allows discussing the spatial interactions against the background of pollution‐related (e.g., pollutant diffusion, cold‐start emissions, additional emissions through traffic congestion) and preference‐related (e.g., exposure during the commute versus at the residential location, size of the impact neighbourhood) framework conditions and planning approaches (localized lump‐sum taxes, cordon tolls, flat taxes). We discuss the stability and performance criteria of the resulting cities, which are on the one hand city aggregates (e.g., total emissions, total exposure, spatial extent of the urban area), but on the other hand and more importantly location‐dependent disaggregates (local patterns of land rents, exposure, green spaces, design of the road network). Thus, our paper interlinks pollution‐related concerns and urban structures from a health and environmental perspective, which take place at different spatial scales (different radii of interaction) and thereby ties in with the compaction‐sprawl debate in the literature. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (4 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailConsidering activity pattern to achieve a more sustainable commuting behavior
Sprumont, François UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Viti, Francesco UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016, September 19)

While commuting allows workers to take part to the economy, this specific trip represents a non-negligible share of the total trips undertaken by individuals. Because of the repetitive pattern both in ... [more ▼]

While commuting allows workers to take part to the economy, this specific trip represents a non-negligible share of the total trips undertaken by individuals. Because of the repetitive pattern both in time and space of the home-to-work trip, different transport policies can be implemented in order to reduce some of its negative impacts. Travel Demand Management (TDM) measures aim at reducing the transport demand or inducing a modal shift towards active or public transport modes. Too often, these strategies, by focusing narrowly on the home-to-work trip, do not take into account the complexity of the individuals’ daily activity chain. Indeed, the complexity of the activity pattern might impede some workers to use public or active modes for the commuting trip despite, for instance, a very short home-to-work distance. Results of a Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) approach indicates that, for working days, socio-demographic variables affect more car use than activity-chain complexity. Thus, the proposed TDM measures aiming at decreasing car use for commuting takes into account the daily activity behavior but also suggest ways to deal with individual’s characteristics [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (11 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLand use and density in the European city: monocentric analysis and scaling
Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2016, August)

In this work we study the evolution of land use and population density in European cities with respect to the distance to the city centre, and how land use and density curves scale with city population ... [more ▼]

In this work we study the evolution of land use and population density in European cities with respect to the distance to the city centre, and how land use and density curves scale with city population. The principal aim of this research is to provide stylized facts and generic formulas for the calibration of monocentric urban economic models to European cities. We use the GMES Urban Atlas database, providing a precise description of land use in the 305 major European larger urban zones (LUZ), which have more than 100.000 inhabitants. For the population density we use the Geostat population grid, which covers the whole of European Union (EU) with a 1km$^2$ grid dataset. We combine the land use and population datasets by attributing the population of the Geostat grid to the geographic units of the (much more precise) land use dataset. This attribution is proportional to the surface of each unit and weighted thanks to the nomenclature of the GMES Urban Atlas, which gives classes of soil sealing and density of urban fabric. Then we analyse the evolution with distance to the city centre, which we define for convenience as the location of the city hall, of population density and of the share of land used for different purposes: housing, roads, railways, urban green, water, agriculture, forest. To this end, we define concentric rings of fixed width around the city centre, in which we average land use and population. In order to compare results between different cities and to obtain a global picture ("average" or "standard" European city), we study simple scaling relationships for the obtained monocentric land use shares and density curves. We choose to study the scaling of these curves with respect to the city population, as has been done in the literature for different parameters (like income or road space). In our case city population is taken as the population of the LUZ, computed thanks to the population grid. It turns out that land use curves, in particular housing or roads shares, tend to scale like the square root of city population. Population curves have roughly exponential shapes, as widely modelled in the literature, and tend to scale like the city population to a power close to $1/3$. These results allow us to propose a simple monocentric description of land use shares and population curves in a representative European city, whose size can be chosen based on the scaling relationships we obtain. This result is especially interesting, and of practical use, for the purpose of calibration of monocentric urban models. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailEquilibrium and first-best city with endogenous exposure to local air pollution from traffic
Schindler, Mirjam UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Picard, Pierre M UL

E-print/Working paper (2016)

Exposure to urban traffic-induced air pollution is a major health concern of cities. This paper analyzes the urban structure when localized pollution exposure arises from commuting traffic and ... [more ▼]

Exposure to urban traffic-induced air pollution is a major health concern of cities. This paper analyzes the urban structure when localized pollution exposure arises from commuting traffic and investigates the feedback effect of endogenous pollution on residential choices. The presence of stronger traffic-induced air pollution exposure reduces the geographical extent and the population of cities. Land rents fall with distance from the city center while population densities may be non-monotonic. Cleaner vehicle technologies reduce pollution exposure everywhere, increase population and density everywhere and do not affect the spatial extent of the city. The paper compares the urban equilibrium with the first-best. The first-best structure is a less expanded city with higher densities at the center and lower densities at the fringe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 214 (18 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLand use and density in the European city: monocentric analysis and scaling
Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2016, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBike-share rebalancing strategies, patterns, and purpose
Medard de Chardon, Cyrille UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Thomas, Isabelle

in Journal of Transport Geography (2016), 55

We provide a first spatio-temporal exploration of bicycle sharing system (BSS) rebalancing patterns from data extracted for individual stations at a fine temporal scale and operator interviews. Analyzing ... [more ▼]

We provide a first spatio-temporal exploration of bicycle sharing system (BSS) rebalancing patterns from data extracted for individual stations at a fine temporal scale and operator interviews. Analyzing rebalancing operations for nine BSS, we describe implications for operators, municipalities, and future optimization work. We find that stations adjacent to transit hubs receive disproportionate amounts of rebalancing relative to trips and that rebalancing is more often responding to morning and afternoon demand exceeding station dock capacities rather than longer term accumulations of bicycles. More importantly, we observe some operator’ rebalancing behaviors constrained between opposing goals of maximizing trips, profits, and service level agreements. Many BSS have no explicitly defined purpose, but existing rebalancing strategies can support or clash with the purpose or suggested benefits of a BSS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 149 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailLand use and density in the European city: monocentric analysis and scaling
Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2016, May)

In this work we study the profile of land use and population density in European cities with respect to the distance to the city centre. More specifically we address the scaling of land use and density ... [more ▼]

In this work we study the profile of land use and population density in European cities with respect to the distance to the city centre. More specifically we address the scaling of land use and density curves with respect to city population and rely on fine grained land use data. Our main objective is to retrieve generic laws that can support the calibration of monocentric urban economic models for European cities. We use the GMES Urban Atlas database, providing a precise description of land use at 5m resolution in the 305 major European urban areas (more than 100.000 inhabitants). We combine this dataset with population density from the Geostat population grid, which covers the whole of European Union (EU) with a 1km2 resolution. Population is allocated proportionally to surface and weighted by soil sealing and density classes of the GMES data. We analyse the evolution with distance to the city centre, which we define for convenience as the location of the city hall, of population density and of the share of land used for different purposes: housing, roads, railways, urban green, water, agriculture, forest. To this end, we define concentric rings of fixed width around the city centre, in which we average each land use and population. In order to compare different cities and to identify a global picture, i.e. a standard representative European city, we study scaling relationships for the ob- tained monocentric land use shares and density curves. We analyse the scaling of these curves with respect to city population, following similar approaches con- ducted in the literature for different parameters (such as income or road space). The total population for each city is computed from the population grid. We find that land use curves, in particular housing and roads shares, tend to scale like the square root of city population. Population curves have roughly exponential shapes, as it has been widely modelled in the literature, although usually not based on land use and soil sealing data. Population curves tend to scale like the city population to a power close to 1/3. These results allow us to propose a simple monocentric description of land use shares and population curves in a representative European city, whose size can be chosen based on the scaling relationships we obtain. This result is especially interesting, and of practical use, for the purpose of calibration and validation of monocentric urban models, that can differentiate (or not) housing from land and include interactions between non-developed and developed land. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 234 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGIS-based modelling of shallow geothermal energy potential for CO2 emission mitigation in urban areas
Schiel, Kerry UL; Baume, Olivier; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

in Renewable Energy : An International Journal (2016), 86

Due to the rapidly increasing percentage of the population living in urban centres, there is a need to focus on the energy demand of these cities and the use of renewable energies instead of fossil fuels ... [more ▼]

Due to the rapidly increasing percentage of the population living in urban centres, there is a need to focus on the energy demand of these cities and the use of renewable energies instead of fossil fuels. In this paper, we develop a spatial model to determine the potential per parcel for using shallow geothermal energy, for space heating and hot water. The method is based on the space heating and hot water energy demand of each building and the specific heat extraction potential of the subsurface per parcel. With this information, along with the available space per parcel for boreholes, the percentage of the energy demand that could be supplied by geothermal energy is calculated. The potential reduction in CO2 emissions should all possible geothermal energy be utilised, is also calculated. The method is applied to Ludwigsburg, Germany. It was found that CO2 emissions could potentially be reduced by 29.7% if all space heating and hot water requirements were provided by geothermal energy, which would contribute to the sustainability of a city. The method is simple in execution and could be applied to other cities as the data used should be readily available. Another advantage is the implementation into the web based Smart City Energy platform which allows interactive exploration of solutions across the city. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 254 (11 UL)
Full Text
See detailFormes Urbaines et Aménités Vertes
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCollective and Cooperative Behaviour Models
Provitolo, Damienne; Frankhauser, Pierre; Morer, Myriam et al

in Frankhauser, Pierre; Ansel, Dominique (Eds.) Deciding Where to Live (2016)

In modelling residential choice we cannot escape the debate about the effect of societal context on an individual’s decision-making. This debate depends on whether we set more store by the aggregate scale ... [more ▼]

In modelling residential choice we cannot escape the debate about the effect of societal context on an individual’s decision-making. This debate depends on whether we set more store by the aggregate scale of society or by the individual’s decision-making. An individual-centred approach will focus on the particularities of an individual and the way her past, for example, influences her decisions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (3 UL)
See detailLa ville est insensible aux formes idéales
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

L’urbanisme, c’est bien plus qu’une simple affaire de dessin en plan. Un dessin en plan, si régulier soit-il sur le plan géométrique/géométral, ne donnera en fait jamais dans la réalité deux villes ... [more ▼]

L’urbanisme, c’est bien plus qu’une simple affaire de dessin en plan. Un dessin en plan, si régulier soit-il sur le plan géométrique/géométral, ne donnera en fait jamais dans la réalité deux villes identiques quant à leur fonctionnement. La vie d’une ville se passe dans le temps, ses occupants et ses activités produisent des strates qui se cumulent et produisent un espace hétérogène. Cette « dépendance de chemin » contraint fortement les activités et les flux, au point de les rendre insensibles à des impositions, même fortes, mais elle crée aussi des opportunités de reconversion, des quartiers attractifs, uniques voire sympathiques. Les villes wallonnes n’y échappent pas, jouons-en ! [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGreener and larger neighbourhoods make cities more sustainable! A 2D urban economics perspective
Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Cavailhès, Jean; Peeters, Dominique et al

in Computers, Environment & Urban Systems (2015), 54

We analyse urban growth forms by means of a 2D microeconomic model where households value green space at neighbourhood scale. We analytically demonstrate that cities can grow more densely when households ... [more ▼]

We analyse urban growth forms by means of a 2D microeconomic model where households value green space at neighbourhood scale. We analytically demonstrate that cities can grow more densely when households have the possibility to enlarge the neighbourhood in which they value green space, thus emphasizing the importance of neighbourhood planning in particular for facilitating short trips and views of green amenities. We also show by simulation that the size and form of the city, relative to the size and form of neighbourhoods, impact on the decision of households to leapfrog land or not, thus impacting on the emergence of scattered urbanisation patterns. We conclude that carefully addressing the spatial arrangement of green space and buildings and facilitating trips within neighbourhood units constitute an effective policy lever and an attractive way to deliver more sustainable cities. We further argue that our theoretical experiment with complementary analytical and computer-based simulation provides micro-economic reasoning to the main elements of the Garden City and neighbourhood unit planning concepts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 331 (47 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMonocentric urban simulation models: getting closer to fractal properties and landscape representation
Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Frankhauser, Pierre; Vuidel, Gilles et al

Scientific Conference (2015, November)

Urban growth generates spatial patterns that in many cases demonstrate fractal properties. Geocomputational models, particularly cellular automata and spatial agent-based simulation models have been used ... [more ▼]

Urban growth generates spatial patterns that in many cases demonstrate fractal properties. Geocomputational models, particularly cellular automata and spatial agent-based simulation models have been used over the last 20 years to generate urbanisation patterns with the aim to replicate at best observed expansion footprints, including matching observed and simulated fractal dimensions. In applied cases, with the addition of constraints at multiple scales (land constraints, threshold per zones, etc.) simulation models seem to perform rather well and obtain sound urban fractal dimensions. Models that are more parsimonious in parameters however do not seem to perform as well. Exceptions are those models directly inspired from physics such as DLA (Diffusion Limited Aggregation) or DBM (Dielectric Breakdown Models) but these are frustrating when it comes to behavioural or economic interpretation. Models with explicit micro-economic component in a monocentric setting also seem to lag behind in terms of fractal performance: unless exogenous spatial heterogeneity is provided, the spatial outcome of these models is too homogenous to resemble real cities, despite agglomeration and dispersion processes at neighbourhood scale and despite the self-emergence of road networks and subsequent open land lock-ins. Rather than resolving to exogenous polycentric setting or exogenous stochasticity that would provide better looking outcomes, we investigate this insatisfaction by exploring the results of an augmented micro-economic simulation model on a theoretical monocentric space. The innovations are brought along three rationales: Firstly, an assumption is made that the length of the infrastructure network should feed back into households budget. Cities cannot expand too quickly not only because of unitary commuting costs but also infrastructure costs. We therefore implement an infrastructure tax that should lead to agglomeration or a more efficient generation of roads from the city perspective. Secondly, we assume that the infill of undeveloped spaces by new residents is limited by residents who settled earlier in the city and refuse important utility losses in terms of open green space. This leads to relaxing the assumption of a dynamic adaptation of rents and building stock trough time. Free entry and placement is somehow limited by a public authority that keeps utility at its higher possible state at each time step. Thirdly, we abandon the assumption that neighbourhood quality is related to the density of available activities or the density of green space within a given neighbourhood, but replace this with the access to a diversity of urban and green opportunities depending on their use frequency (daily walk, playground, hiking in forest,…). This is a very important change in geocomputational terms since simple focal functions can no longer be used to represent externalities in simulation models. The gradual construction of roads and houses change gradually the nature of the landscape and the value taken out of it, typically by dividing green patches into parts, creating detours to access bigger parks, shadowing effects, etc. In addition, this requires that landscape objects are represented as vectors, not cells, which is a second important change in geocomputational terms. To some extent this brings urban simulation models closer to landscape ecology and graph-based approaches. In this paper we explore and contrast the effects of the three mechanisms mentioned above on the resulting urban morphology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeighborhood green and services diversity effects on land prices: evidence from a multilevel hedonic analysis in Luxembourg
Glaesener, Marie-Line UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Landscape & Urban Planning (2015), 143

The article aims at revealing the role of green space diversity and the mix of neighborhood services on the price of residential land in Luxembourg. We use a multilevel approach to estimate a hedonic ... [more ▼]

The article aims at revealing the role of green space diversity and the mix of neighborhood services on the price of residential land in Luxembourg. We use a multilevel approach to estimate a hedonic model in order to benefit from the hierarchical structure of the data and to reveal spatial heterogeneity in the valuation of these neighborhood qualities. In addition to standard accessibility and socio-economic variables, we include geographical variables in the form of neighborhood mix indices and a Shannon diversity index of land-uses. Via a spatial cross-regressive specification we also test whether our nested levels are able to capture most of the spatial dependence. Our results show that the presence of a mix of services and green space does not directly impact prices, but that the diversity of land-uses (Shannon index) matters, and has negative effects when considered within immediate proximity and positive effects within a walking distance. Land use effects however vary spatially and emphasize the contrast between regions that are particularly attractive and picturesque, and the former industrial conurbation. In our case we also show the ability of the multilevel approach to capture spatial auto-correlation effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (6 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDielectric breakdown and urban growth: Morphological similarities or conceptual links?
Frankhauser, Pierre; Peeters, Dominique; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

Scientific Conference (2015, September)

Urban dynamics generate sprawl patterns that reveals in many cases fractal-like properties. This is the reason why a couple of research projects focused on how to simulate the growth of such patterns ... [more ▼]

Urban dynamics generate sprawl patterns that reveals in many cases fractal-like properties. This is the reason why a couple of research projects focused on how to simulate the growth of such patterns while respecting their fractal features. It is well-known that cellular automata can be used for generating random fractal structures. This holds e.g. for certain models developed in physics like DLA (Diffusion Limited Aggregation) or DBM (Dielectric Breakdown Models) and thus such models inspired urban growth simulation models. However in physics these models are based on a transcription of the underlying physical laws, combining electrodynamics and thermodynamics. Hence DLA and DBM are not just morpho-descriptive, but refer to explanatory approaches. However it seems difficult to establish a direct causal link between these approaches and urban growth. The goal of several recent models was to introduce a more explanatory approach for simulating the emergence of urban patterns by means of cellular automata. Following this objective, micro-economic reasoning has been used for describing households’ residential choice behaviour and constituting the driving force of cellular automata. These models assume that households settle down subsequently in the vicinity of a preexisting CBD where jobs are localized. Households have preferences for social and green amenities in their neighbourhood. Even if these approaches can explain some properties of urban growth processes, like leapfrogging, the patterns generated do not really show fractal properties, even if some morphological analogies with DBM have been identified. Moreover in the enunciated models, the dynamics is driven only by the evaluation of households who to want to settle down in the already existing city region. The City Administration is supposed to construct new road segments without consequences for the budget of the households. This is questionable. Here we introduce a model that starts from a pre-existing cross-like street network with a CBD at the crossing point where all kinds of services, shopping amenities and jobs are concentrated. However we introduce a series of new mechanisms. First, new arriving households use the utility of already located households as a reference. Second a tax per household is introduced for maintaining the existing street network and the infrastructures of the pre-existing centre. New households can improve the utility of urban population by contributing to these fixed costs. However if a well evaluated site needs to be connected by a new road segment to the existing street network, this will increase the costs for total maintenance of the street network and thus the tax. Third, each household wants to benefit from green amenities for different use (daily walks, playground, hiking…) but the construction of side branches of the road network can impede direct accesses to open landscapes and can generate supplementary travel costs thus impacting the budget of households. This “shadowing effect” reminds some mechanisms of the DBM-models. The model thus combines different aspects acting positively or negatively on the households’ utility and budget. According to the expected changes to their indirect utility function, the households who have settled down earlier in the city will not be in favour of accepting new households. This paper focuses on the conceptualization of the model and on the morphological properties of the emerging patterns. It is illustrated by several simulation results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSurrounding density and green space. What effects of proximity on land prices?
Glaesener, Marie-Line UL; Licheron, Julien; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2015, September)

We aim at measuring the impact of neighbourhood population density and land-use configuration on land prices in Luxembourg. The objective is to identify the importance of the local scale of urban design ... [more ▼]

We aim at measuring the impact of neighbourhood population density and land-use configuration on land prices in Luxembourg. The objective is to identify the importance of the local scale of urban design, with regard to the critics on compact urban development common practice in spatial planning today. We rely on address-based data for land transactions registered by notaries. Standard controls i.e. access to jobs, plots’ characteristics, socio-economic neighbourhood and service availability are considered at local scale. The originality lies in the land-use and population density data, which is available at a very fine scale. Hence different sizes of neighbourhoods around the sold land plots can be tested to identify at what extent different land-uses and their configuration are valued by residential land consumers. Further, we test whether consumers’ preferences for population density are varying with distance to the plot. In this perspective, we apply the hedonic pricing method, with the focus is turned to spatial econometrics, testing different approaches and spatial weight matrices, and how to consider time and repeated sales. Results are expected to test (i) that consumers value the availability and diversity of green land uses differently with distance; and (ii) that preferences for population density vary with distance. We hypothesize that increased population density in immediate proximity is valued negatively, but at some distance to the plot this impact may become positive. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (0 UL)