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See detailHow does the relative spatial pattern of green within cities impact carbon uptake? A European scale analysis
Boura, Marlène Delphine Fabienne UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 06)

Cities constitute the main source of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Urban areas exhibit a variety of land use profiles and carbon metabolisms. Yet it is important to assess to what extent they can ... [more ▼]

Cities constitute the main source of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Urban areas exhibit a variety of land use profiles and carbon metabolisms. Yet it is important to assess to what extent they can cope with their own emissions. We address this issue by examining how the internal spatial organization of cities can impact the flow of anthropogenic CO2 between their major sources - human activities - ; and their main storage infrastructures, with a focus here on urban green spaces and forests. Is it better to have a dense core with a peripheric green belt? Large green patches within the core centre? Or small and fragmented green spaces? The objective of the present work is to tests whether the internal spatial organization of urban areas - in terms of green infrastructure characteristics and land use types - matters for evaluating carbon sequestration potentials within urban areas. Or whether they can simply be considered as single objects with a quantity of carbon emissions and a carbon sink capacity derived directly from aggregated land use data. We present a spatially explicit urban carbon flow model. Using land use data, an emission inventory and sequestration potentials from the vegetation we allocate a carbon budget to each spatial unit within the urban systems. Anthropogenic CO2 emissions are accounted from different land use categories using the TNO CAMS dataset. The potential of carbon sequestration by the urban forest is set using estimates from the literature. Urban carbon flows are then simulated for all Functional Urban Areas (FUAs) of European cities using the Urban Atlas 2012 database. Most studies on carbon dioxide uptake into vegetation at city or metropolitan scales estimate carbon stocks or aggregated carbon flows, while spatially explicit urban carbon flow analyses are made on spatially limited areas - i.e. neighbourhood level. Also, the homogenous land use data and emissions inventory at the continental level allows for a comparison of the different urban areas. We then compare the aggregated budget of the areas of study – commonly done in budget approaches from micro to global scale – to the spatially explicit budget. It allows us to estimate the real contribution of the urban forest to the uptake of anthropogenic emissions within the same urban ecosystem. The analysis then investigates the level of efficiency of CO2 uptake for different typology of urban areas for different carbon profiles. The efficiency is defined as the share of local emissions captured within the urban boundaries. In the future, the model will be validated using eddy covariance empirical data. [less ▲]

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See detailLandscape typology of urban forest ecosystem services across European urban areas
Boura, Marlène Delphine Fabienne UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

Urban areas exhibit a large variety of patterns which may affect the negative externalities of human settlements on ecosystems. Ecosystem Services (ES) can help assessing the urban pressure on the ... [more ▼]

Urban areas exhibit a large variety of patterns which may affect the negative externalities of human settlements on ecosystems. Ecosystem Services (ES) can help assessing the urban pressure on the environment and its impact on the well-being of inhabitants. Compactness or densities have often been associated to potential ES. Yet, the effects of the relative spatial arrangement of vegetation, forests and water bodies, with respect to the urban lands - which are source of anthropogenic CO2 emissions - on potential ES are still not systematically analysed. In this work we propose a typology, for about 800 European urban areas (>50,000 inhabitants) based on the intra-urban structure of cities and the associated ES potentials. The GMES/Copernicus Urban Atlas 2012 database provides a comparable definition of urban area and land use categories, necessary to a systematic cross-European analysis. More particularly, we investigate the share of different land uses and the distance between human settlements, forests and the other vegetated lands as well as their relative spatial distribution within urban settlements. We then use spatial metrics as proxies for urban ES associated with urban forests – e.g., micro climate regulation (air cooling, shade), air pollution removal (canopy), rainwater runoff (impervious lands). The typology is created using an unsupervised machine learning approach (clustering) with standardized spatial metrics as input data. Different urban “forest cultures” across the continent are observable. Urban areas around the Mediterranean sea - facing warmer temperatures - attribute significantly more space to herbaceous lands (10 to 70%), but generally less than 10% for forests. Transport networks and infrastructures are more present along the axe going from central UK, to Italy and on the east coast of Spain (5 to 9%). Similarly, Industrial built up lands are more present along this axe, including west Germany, Romania and the east coast of Spain (5 to 22%). [less ▲]

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See detailUrban densities and patterns: stylized facts and generic abstract tools
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

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See detailAlonso and the Scaling of Urban Profiles
Delloye, Justin; Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Geographical Analysis (2019)

How urban characteristics change with total population, their scaling behavior, has become an important research field since one needs to better understand the challenges of urban densification. Yet urban ... [more ▼]

How urban characteristics change with total population, their scaling behavior, has become an important research field since one needs to better understand the challenges of urban densification. Yet urban scaling research is largely disconnected from intra-urban structure, and this seriously limits its operationalization. In contrast, the monocentric model of Alonso provides a residential choice-based theory to urban density profiles. However, dedicated comparative static analyses do not completely solve how the model scales with population. This article bridges this gap by simultaneously introducing power laws for land, income and transport cost in the Alonso model. We show that the equilibrium urban structure of this augmented model matches recent empirical findings about the scaling of European population density profiles and satisfactorily represents European cities. This result is however not compatible with the observed scaling power of housing land profiles, and challenges current empirical understanding of wage and transport cost elasticities with population. Our results call for revisiting theories about land development and housing processes as well as the empirics of agglomeration benefits and transport costs. [less ▲]

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See detailMobility among older adults: Deconstructing the effects of motility and movement on wellbeing
Cuignet, T.; Perchoux, C.; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

in Urban Studies (2019)

Daily mobility has been shown to contribute to the wellbeing of older adults, as it promotes healthy and independent living. However, very little is known about how the complex relationships between ... [more ▼]

Daily mobility has been shown to contribute to the wellbeing of older adults, as it promotes healthy and independent living. However, very little is known about how the complex relationships between locations, geographic environments and daily mobility relate to wellbeing. In the current paper, we rely on the concept of ‘motility’– defined as potential mobility– and the concept of ‘movement’– defined as actual mobility– to take a step forwards in disentangling the relationship between mobility and wellbeing. We further examine how both motility and movement relate to two complementary definitions of wellbeing: hedonic wellbeing as a measurement of happiness, and eudaimonic wellbeing as the actualisation of an individual’s human potential. To investigate this relationship, we draw up a conceptual framework stressing pathways linking mobility to wellbeing, which we empirically test using structural equation modelling on a stratified sample of 470 older adults. We first quantitatively confirm that motility is defined by access, competences, appropriation and attitudes to modes of transportation. We then observe that motility has direct effects on eudaimonic wellbeing and, to a lesser extent, on hedonic wellbeing. Part of the motility effects on wellbeing are mediated by movement. Separating mobility into motility and movement stresses the independent and complementary role that potential and realised mobility play in shaping older adults’ wellbeing. © Urban Studies Journal Limited 2019. [less ▲]

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See detail21st European Colloquium on Theoretical and Quantitative Geography: Book of abstracts
Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Gerber, Philippe; Jones, Catherine UL et al

Book published by LISER (2019)

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See detailWalking, trip purpose, and exposure to multiple environments: A case study of older adults in Luxembourg
Perchoux, C.; Brondeel, R.; Wasfi, R. et al

in Journal of Transport and Health (2019), 13

Purpose: Understanding the geographical and environmental triggers for active transport among older adults is crucial to promote healthy and independent lifestyles. While transportation research has long ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Understanding the geographical and environmental triggers for active transport among older adults is crucial to promote healthy and independent lifestyles. While transportation research has long considered trip purpose as a major determinant of transport mode choices, “place and health” research has paid little attention to it, and even less in connection with environmental determinants. To avoid an oversimplification of how neighborhood built environments influence utilitarian walking, it is critical to account simultaneously for trip purposes, the locations of visited places, and the related exposure to surrounding environments. Methods: Based on a cohort of 471 older adults in Luxembourg, this study examines the influence of trip purposes on utilitarian walking, and the potential interaction effects with characteristics of multiple geographic environments and distance to the place of residence. Information related to demographics, health status, and regularly visited destinations was collected in 2015 and 2016. Associations between trip purpose, environment, distance, and walking were analyzed using multilevel logistic regressions, accounting for demographics, neighborhood self-selection, and health status. Results: After accounting for environmental attributes, distance, and confounding factors, trip purpose remained a strong correlate of walking among older adults. Associations between distance and walking strongly differed by trip purpose (Wald Chi 2 test p < 0.001). Access to amenities, public transport stops, and street connectivity were associated with walking, although no interaction with trip purpose was observed. Conclusion: Trip purposes based on free-time activities–including visits to family and friends, and restaurants and cafés–seem to be less influenced by the barrier effect of distance on walking. While place and health studies increasingly address both the “where” and “when” of travel behaviors, the current study additionally stresses the importance of the trip purpose to emphasize “why” and “for what” people walk. © 2019 [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for the homothetic scaling of urban forms
Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science (2018)

The size and form of cities influence their social and environmental impacts. Whether cities have the same form irrespective of their size is still an open question. We analyse the profile of artificial ... [more ▼]

The size and form of cities influence their social and environmental impacts. Whether cities have the same form irrespective of their size is still an open question. We analyse the profile of artificial land and population density, with respect to the distance to their main centre, for the 300 largest European cities. Our analysis combines the GMES/Copernicus Urban Atlas 2006 land use database at 5 m resolution for 300 larger urban zones with more than 100,000 inhabitants and the Geostat population grid at 1 km resolution. We find a remarkable constancy of radial profiles across city sizes. Artificial land profiles scale in the two horizontal dimensions with the square root of city population, while population density profiles scale in three dimensions with its cube root. In short, cities of different size are homothetic in terms of land use and population density, which challenges the idea that larger cities are more parsimonious in the use of land per capita. While earlier literature documented the scaling of average densities (total surface and population) with city size, we document the scaling of the whole radial distance profile with city size, thus liaising intra-urban radial analysis and systems of cities. Our findings also yield homogenous spatial definitions of cities, from which we can re-question urban scaling laws and Zipf’s law for cities. [less ▲]

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See detailThe provision of urban green space and its accessibility: Spatial data effects in Brussels
Le Texier, Marion UL; Schiel, Kerry UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in PLoS ONE (2018), 13(10), 0204684

Urban green space (UGS) has many environmental and social benefits. UGS provision and access are increasingly considered in urban policies and must rely on data and indicators that can capture variations ... [more ▼]

Urban green space (UGS) has many environmental and social benefits. UGS provision and access are increasingly considered in urban policies and must rely on data and indicators that can capture variations in the distribution of UGS within cities. There is no consensus about how UGS, and their provision and access, must be defined from different land use data types. Here we identify four spatial dimensions of UGS and critically examine how different data sources affect these dimensions and our understanding of their variation within a city region (Brussels). We compare UGS indicators measured from an imagery source (NDVI from Landsat), an official cadastre-based map, and the voluntary geographical information provided by OpenStreetMap (OSM). We compare aggregate values of provision and access to UGS as well as their spatial distribution along a centrality gradient and at neighbourhood scale. We find that there are strong differences in the value of indicators when using the different datasets, especially due to their ability to capture private and public green space. However we find that the interpretation of intra-urban spatial variations is not affected by changes in data source. Centrality in particular is a strong determinant of the relative values of UGS availability, fragmentation and accessibility, irrespective of datasets. [less ▲]

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See detailRadial urban forms in Europe
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 27)

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See detailConceptual framework of assessing the influence of cultural complexity to settlement pattern formation
Sikk, Kaarel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Kriiska, Aivar

Scientific Conference (2018, September)

Settlement patterns are one of the main products of prehistorical archaeological research and are used as spatial projections of past societies. In current paper we study how geographical locational data ... [more ▼]

Settlement patterns are one of the main products of prehistorical archaeological research and are used as spatial projections of past societies. In current paper we study how geographical locational data can reveal information about cultural complexity. The formation of the patterns is influenced by multiple factors from human-environment interactions to complex processes within society. We analyse the forces behind formation of settlement patterns from an agent based modelling perspective. For the purpose we construct a spatial discrete choice model and formulate it using random utility theory. We argue that agent decisions in the models can be decomposed into different rulesets. Those rules are mostly determined by attraction to natural affordances and sociocultural behaviours. Paleoecological and geological data can be used to extract information about human attraction to natural affordances. Analysing the resulting empirical data can reveal the significance of environment as determining settlement choice which we argue is declining with growing cultural complexity. [less ▲]

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See detailTransferring knowledge from locational predictive models into spatial Agent Based Models: generilizing human perception of environment
Sikk, Kaarel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 22)

Predictive models have been used for finding potential archaeological site locations already for more than 40 years. In addition to their extensively used application in cultural heritage management they ... [more ▼]

Predictive models have been used for finding potential archaeological site locations already for more than 40 years. In addition to their extensively used application in cultural heritage management they can also offer insights into past human behaviour in relation to environment. The proposed paper discusses how the information gathered from predictive modelling of archeological settlements, especially the revealed from location determinants, can be transferred to spatial Agent Based Models. We argue that spatial simulation models, especially those based on agents behaviour, above all aim to build theory and create generalisable knowledge. They therefore need to free themselves form local contexts and particular spatial heterogeneities, and automatically test the effect of agents behaviour on a wider range of spatial configurations. In cultural heritage management, models are usually created using geographical variables of existing settlement patterns (eg. water access and land formations). For finding archaeological sites the model needs to be calibrated for specific accuracy and precision. In this paper we focus on defining the potential residential space – an area that could be considered by people of the past as suitable for habitation or specific economic activities. We develop a framework that links geographical variables and behaviour as extracted from empirical studies to the development of a theoretical spatial agent-based model. [less ▲]

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See detailAlonso and the scaling of urban profiles
Delloye, Justin; Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

E-print/Working paper (2018)

Urban characteristics scaling with total population has become an important urban research field since one needs to better understand the benefits and disadvantages of urban growth and fur- ther ... [more ▼]

Urban characteristics scaling with total population has become an important urban research field since one needs to better understand the benefits and disadvantages of urban growth and fur- ther population concentration. Urban scaling research, however, is largely disconnected from the empirics and theory of intra-urban structure for it considers averaged attributes and ignores resi- dential choice trade-offs between transport and housing costs within cities. Using this fundamental trade-off, the monocentric model of Alonso provides theory to urban density profiles. However, it is silent about how these profiles scale with population, thus preventing empirical scaling studies to anchor in a strong micro-economic theory. This paper fixes this gap by introducing power laws for land and for population density in the Alonso model. From an augmented model with land use, we derive the conditions at which equilibrium profiles match recent empirical findings about the scaling of urban land and population density profiles in European cities. We find that the Alonso model is theoretically compatible with the observed scaling of population density profiles and leads to a satisfactory representation of European cities. The conditions for this compatibility refine current understanding of wage and transport costs elasticities with population. Although they require a scaling power of the profile of the share of urbanised land that is different from what is observed, it is argued that alternatives specifications of transport cost functions could solve this issue. Thus our results call for revisiting theories about land development and housing processes as well as the empirics of agglomeration benefits and transport costs. [less ▲]

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See detailAggregate and disaggregate dynamic spatial interaction approaches to modelling coins diffusion
Le Texier, Marion UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Thill, Jean-Claude (Ed.) Spatial Analysis and Location Modeling in Urban and Regional Systems (2018)

With the 2002 introduction of the euro as a common currency in Europe,the possibility has emerged to assess international mobility using this new tracer, given that every coin bears a specific national ... [more ▼]

With the 2002 introduction of the euro as a common currency in Europe,the possibility has emerged to assess international mobility using this new tracer, given that every coin bears a specific national side. Using a simple two-country framework, four dynamic modeling strategies were designed in order to simulate the diffusion of coins and to understand how this diffusion is affected by population size, mobility rates and coin exchange processes. Methodological implications are raised with respect to aggregation, synchronicity and stochasticity issues. Although each model converges to an equilibrium, the time to reach this end stage and the level of coin mixing in each country strongly varies with the modeling strategy. Calibration is undertaken with French data, using mobility rates as adjustment variables. The experiment shows that convergence to a perfect mix of coins can only be obtained if reciprocal exchanges are modeled, with a time horizon around 2064 - while non-reciprocal models indicate an imperfect mix converging in the year 2020 at the latest. [less ▲]

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See detailLe développement du trafic ferroviaire dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Helfer, Malte UL; Pauly, Michel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

The first railways are mentioned in connection with the mining of Agricola in 1556. From the end of the 18th century onwards, the first long-distance horse-drawn railways were built, some of which created ... [more ▼]

The first railways are mentioned in connection with the mining of Agricola in 1556. From the end of the 18th century onwards, the first long-distance horse-drawn railways were built, some of which created real networks. The first railway line to use steam locomotives was the Stockton and Darlington Railway, 40 kilometres long, commissioned in 1825 in England. On the continent, the first steam railway line was opened on 5 May 1835 in Belgium, between Brussels and Mechelen, while the line opened in 1831 in France, from Saint-Etienne to Lyon, as well as the one in December 1835 in Germany, between Nürnberg and Fürth, were only rarely used by locomotives, but rather by horse-drawn vehicles. This article deals with the first railway connections in the various regions of the Greater Region SaarLorLux. [less ▲]

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See detailMigrants internationaux et migration dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Nienaber, Birte UL; Roos, Ursula; Helfer, Malte UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

With regard to demographic change and the decline in birth rates in some parts of the Greater Region SaarLorLux, migration has become increasingly significant in recent years. The population growth ... [more ▼]

With regard to demographic change and the decline in birth rates in some parts of the Greater Region SaarLorLux, migration has become increasingly significant in recent years. The population growth currently observed in the Greater Region is also primarily due to significant gains in migration. Between 1990 and 2006, net immigration to the Greater Region amounted to 558,500 persons, although migration influenced population development to varying degrees in the individual sub-regions. [less ▲]

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See detailCity delineation in European applications of LUTI models: review and tests
Thomas, Isabelle; Jones, Jonathan; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

in Transport Reviews (2018), 38(1), 6-32

This paper stresses the lack of attention paid to the geographical definitions of cities in LUTI models as one key detrimental aspect to transferring and generalising LUTI results. First, the ... [more ▼]

This paper stresses the lack of attention paid to the geographical definitions of cities in LUTI models as one key detrimental aspect to transferring and generalising LUTI results. First, the argumentation develops from a meta-analysis of peer-reviewed publications about LUTI applications in European cities. We show that most authors do not assess findings against potential geographical biases. Second, theoretical simulations are conducted with UrbanSim applied to a synthetic urban area. By varying the geographical limits of the system and population endowments, our simulations confirm that the absence of control on city delineation weakens the results. Finally, the paper suggests methodological guidelines to improve the comparability of LUTI applications and push forward their theoretical agenda. [less ▲]

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See detailA multi-scale fine-grained LUTI model to simulate land-use scenarios in Luxembourg
Gerber, Philippe; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Cornélis, Eric et al

in Journal of Transport and Land Use (2018), 11(1), 255272

The increasing attractiveness of Luxembourg as a place to work and live puts its land use and transport systems under high pressure. Understanding how the country can accommodate residential growth and ... [more ▼]

The increasing attractiveness of Luxembourg as a place to work and live puts its land use and transport systems under high pressure. Understanding how the country can accommodate residential growth and additional traffic in a sustainable manner is a key and difficult challenge that requires a policy relevant, flexible and responsive modelling framework. We describe the first fully fledged land-use and transport interaction framework (MOEBIUS) applied to the whole of Luxembourg. We stress its multi-scalar nature and detail the articulation of two of its main components: a dynamic demographic microsimulation at the scale of individuals and a micro-spatial scale simulation of residential choice. Conversely to traditional zone-based approaches, the framework keeps full details of households and individuals for residential and travel mode choice, making the model highly consistent with theory. In addition, results and policy constraints are implemented at a very fine resolution (20m) and can thus incorporate local effects (residential externalities, local urban design). Conversely to fully disaggregated approaches, a linkage is organized at an intermediate scale, which allows one (1) to simplify the generation and spatial distribution of trips, (2) to parallelize parts of the residential choice simulation, and (3) to ensure a good calibration of the population and real estate market estimates. We show model outputs for different scenarios at the horizon 2030 and compare them along sustainability criteria. [less ▲]

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See detailLa production en céramique dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Decker, Emile; Helfer, Malte UL; Pauly, Michel UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

Consisting of four entities, regions or states, located in the heart of Europe, the Greater Region SaarLorLux has long been considered a territory with a rich industrial past of great dynamism. Among the ... [more ▼]

Consisting of four entities, regions or states, located in the heart of Europe, the Greater Region SaarLorLux has long been considered a territory with a rich industrial past of great dynamism. Among the many branches of activity, there is one that has long been a flagship of its skills: ceramics. The term "ceramics" covers a certain number of very different products in terms of their appearance and properties, all made from fired clay. Over time, manufacturing techniques have evolved to produce less and less porous and finer designs. The applications of this material have thus expanded considerably. Working with clay is a long-standing tradition in this region, as the first ceramics discovered at archaeological sites are 7 000 years old. So, for thousands of years, potters made objects out of fired clay. [less ▲]

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