References of "Brunner, Martin"
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See detailForty years on: Childhood intelligence predicts health in middle adulthood.
Wrulich, Marius UL; Brunner, Martin; Stadler, Gertraud et al

in Health Psychology (2014), 33(3), 292-296

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See detail"My questionnaire is too long!" The assessments of motivational-affective constructs with three-item and single-item measures
Gogol, Katarzyna; Brunner, Martin; Goetz, Thomas et al

in Contemporary Educational Psychology (2014), 39(3), 188-205

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See detailHCI Design Methods in CBA: Lessons Learned and Recommendations Based on a Concept Map Use Case
Weinerth, Katja UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Rivas, Salvador UL et al

in Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2014 (2014)

This paper focuses on the user-centered design of a computer-based assessment (CBA) instrument for knowledge measurement. We describe relevant design steps in general and illustrate them via the design of ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on the user-centered design of a computer-based assessment (CBA) instrument for knowledge measurement. We describe relevant design steps in general and illustrate them via the design of our usability improved CBA concept map instrument (ISO 9241-11, 1998; ISO 9241-210, 2010). We discuss design versus evaluation methods from a human-computer interaction (HCI) perspective and emphasize important design steps relevant for constructing usability improved assessment instruments in educational assessment. As these HCI methods are still seldom applied to CBA, this paper helps alleviate the dearth of literature and guidelines in this domain. Our objective is thus to provide the reader with a series of design recommendations for CBA, as derived both from HCI research; and to summarize lessons learned from our specific CBA design use case. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of Usability on Computer-Based Concept Maps in Educational Assessment
Weinerth, Katja UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Brunner, Martin et al

Presentation (2013, July 03)

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See detailSelf-concept in adolescence: A longitudinal study on reciprocal effects of self-perceptions in academic and social domains
Preckel, Franzis; Niepel, Christoph UL; Schneider, Marian et al

in Journal of Adolescence (2013), 36

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See detailA multitrait-multimethod study of assessment instruments for Complex Problem Solving
Greiff, Samuel UL; Fischer, Andreas; Wüstenberg, Sascha UL et al

in Intelligence (2013), 41

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See detailEducational Assessment Meets Usability: Equal Chances for Conducting Computer-Based Concept-Maps
Weinerth, Katja UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Brunner, Martin et al

in Herrington, Jan; Couros, Alec; Irvine, Valerie (Eds.) EdMedia World Conference on Educational Media & Technology 2013 (2013)

This paper describes how usability affects the usage of a computer-based assessment (CBA) instrument. The aim of our current study is twofold: a) the development of a usability improved CBA instrument ... [more ▼]

This paper describes how usability affects the usage of a computer-based assessment (CBA) instrument. The aim of our current study is twofold: a) the development of a usability improved CBA instrument (ISO 9241-11, 1998; ISO 9241-210, 2010) within the framework of human-computer interaction (HCI) and b) the comparison and evaluation of two concept map applications in regards to the impact that usability has on the assessment interaction. In this study we developed and evaluated two CBA concept map applications. We assessed 60 students aged between 16 and 18 who were asked to conduct concept maps on two different versions of the same knowledge assessment instrument. We observed significant differences regarding two out of three usability criteria of the ISO standard definition: efficiency and satisfaction of the students. Our findings highlight that usability influences the assessment interaction and therefore the chances of the assessment taker to work (successfully) through the assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Genetics Lab: A case study on computer-based assessment within a multilingual sample of „digital natives“
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2013)

Computer-based assessment forms a key aspect of educational curricula and international student assessment studies like PISA. Today’s students, however, place special demands on assessment instruments ... [more ▼]

Computer-based assessment forms a key aspect of educational curricula and international student assessment studies like PISA. Today’s students, however, place special demands on assessment instruments used within this context. Multilingual samples with often considerably varying experience in technology use tend to become more and more common in most European countries. Taking the Genetics Lab—a computer-based problem solving scenario—as example, the presented case study evaluates how these challenges can be met by the adaptation of the test construction process, the development of interactive and multimedia instructions, and the integration of game-like characteristics. Psychometric properties, especially measurement invariance of the Genetics Lab’s performance scales are discussed on base of a multilingual and heterogeneous sample of 563 Luxembourgish students. As the Genetics Lab is freely available on the internet, an outlook is given on possible future applications to gather further experience with computer-based assessment within multilingual samples. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents’ Complex Problem-Solving Abilities: Their Structure and Relations to Reasoning Ability and Educational Success
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Intelligence (2013), 41(5), 289-305

Complex Problem Solving (CPS) is considered to be a promising candidate for capturing higher order thinking skills that are emphasized in new educational curricula but are not adequately measured by ... [more ▼]

Complex Problem Solving (CPS) is considered to be a promising candidate for capturing higher order thinking skills that are emphasized in new educational curricula but are not adequately measured by traditional intelligence tests. However, little is known about its psychometric structure and its exact relation to intelligence and educational success—especially in student populations. This study is among the first to use a large and representative sample of secondary school students (N = 563) to examine different measurement models of CPS—that conceptualize the construct as either faceted or hierarchical—and their implications for the construct’s validity. Results showed that no matter which way it was conceptualized, CPS was substantially related to reasoning and to different indicators of educational success. Controlling for reasoning within a joint hierarchical measurement model, however, revealed that the impressive external validity was largely attributable to the variance that CPS shares with reasoning, suggesting that CPS has only negligible incremental validity over and above traditional intelligence scales. On the basis of these results, the value of assessing CPS within the educational context is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGender Differences in the Mean Level, Variability, and Profile Shape of Student Achievement: Results From 41 Countries
Brunner, Martin; Gogol, Katarzyna UL; Sonnleitner, Philipp UL et al

in Intelligence (2013), 41(5), 378-395

A domain-specific hierarchical conceptualization of mathematics achievement can be represented by the standard psychometric model in which a single latent dimension accounts for observed individual ... [more ▼]

A domain-specific hierarchical conceptualization of mathematics achievement can be represented by the standard psychometric model in which a single latent dimension accounts for observed individual differences in scores on the respective subdomains (e.g., quantity). Alternatively, a fully hierarchical conceptualization of achievement can be represented by a nested-factor model in which individual differences in subdomain-specific scores are explained by both general student achievement and specific mathematics achievement. The authors applied both models to study the gender similarity hypothesis, the greater male variability hypothesis, and the masking hypothesis, which predicts that gender differences in general student achievement mask gender differences in both the means and the variability of specific mathematics achievement. Representative data were obtained from 275,369 15-year-old students in 41 countries. The results supported these hypotheses in most countries, demonstrating that a fully hierarchical conceptualization of achievement in terms of the nested-factor model significantly contributes to a better understanding of gender differences in the mean level, variability, and shape of students’ achievement profiles. [less ▲]

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See detailGewissenhaftigkeit und schulische Leistung
Spengler, Marion UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL; Brunner, Martin

in SCRIPT; EMACS (Eds.) PISA 2012. Nationaler Bericht Luxemburg (2013)

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See detailUsing Complex Problem Solving Simulations for General Cognitive Ability Assessment: the Genetics Lab Framework
Mayer, Hélène; Hazotte, Cyril; Djaghloul, Younes et al

in International Journal of Information Science and Intelligent System (2013), 2(4), 71-88

This paper presents the conception and operation of “the Genetics Lab,” a research platform designed for general intelligence measurement. This tool has been developed and refined to measure cognitive ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the conception and operation of “the Genetics Lab,” a research platform designed for general intelligence measurement. This tool has been developed and refined to measure cognitive skills of students in Luxembourg, Thanks to its generic and clear architecture, “the Genetics Lab” makes a major contribution by addressing technical weaknesses and flaws met with tools previously used to assess intelligence. This new platform can be used as groundwork for other evaluation solutions. In this paper, we explore in depth the main fields of e-assessment such as instructions, localized and multilingual content production and display, traces, and scoring. We also describe how the platform was put into action to create complex simulations and to make data collection resulting from the user’s test a flawless process. This paper is a continuation and extension of earlier work. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of language and mode on two-digit magnitude judgments in German-French bilingual adults
Ugen, Sonja UL; Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Presentation (2012, July 17)

The study examined the effect of language and presentation mode on numerical processing skills in German-French bilinguals. This bilingual combination is particularly interesting because the order of two ... [more ▼]

The study examined the effect of language and presentation mode on numerical processing skills in German-French bilinguals. This bilingual combination is particularly interesting because the order of two digit number words is inversed in both languages: decade-unit in French but unit-decade in German. Further, previous studies used written number word presentations as verbal notation to activate language, which are, however, rarely used in everyday life. The present study therefore tackled the question whether two-digit magnitude judgments are affected by the presentation mode (visual Arabic vs. auditory words) and the language (German vs. French)? Data stem from proficient German-French bilinguals (mean age: 25,3 years. The within-subject design involved two-digit number pair comparisons presented visually and auditory in German and in French. In line with previous studies, participants responded faster and more accurately on compatible than on incompatible trials in the visual Arabic presentation mode in both languages (compatibility effect): In compatible number pairs, the decades and units concord to the same magnitude decision (e.g. 23_57; decade: 2<5 and unit:3<7) whereas decade and units discord (47_82; decade: 4<8 but 7>2) for incompatible number pairs. In the auditory mode, the results showed a tendency for a regular compatibility effect in German and an inverse compatibility effect in French with participants responding faster on incompatible trials suggesting that bilinguals process numerical tasks in the language of presentation similar to monolinguals using the same language. Conclusively, the results imply differential numerical processing according to the presentation mode (visual Arabic vs. auditory words) and the language (German vs. French). [less ▲]

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See detailThe Genetics Lab. Acceptance and psychometric characteristics of a computer-based microworld to assess Complex Problem Solving
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling (2012), 54

Computer-based problem solving scenarios or “microworlds” are contemporary assessment instruments frequently used to assess students’ complex problem solving behavior – a key aspect of today’s educational ... [more ▼]

Computer-based problem solving scenarios or “microworlds” are contemporary assessment instruments frequently used to assess students’ complex problem solving behavior – a key aspect of today’s educational curricula and assessment frameworks. Surprisingly, almost nothing is known about their (1) acceptance or (2) psychometric characteristics in student populations. This article introduces the Genetics Lab (GL), a newly developed microworld, and addresses this lack of empirical data in two studies. Findings from Study 1, with a sample of 61 ninth graders, show that acceptance of the GL was high and that the internal consistencies of the scores obtained were satisfactory. In addition, meaningful intercorrelations between the scores supported the instrument’s construct validity. Study 2 drew on data from 79 ninth graders in differing school types. Large to medium correlations with figural and numerical reasoning scores provided evidence for the instrument’s construct validity. In terms of external validity, substantial correlations were found between academic performance and scores on the GL, most of which were higher than those observed between academic performance and the reasoning scales administered. In sum, this research closes an important empirical gap by (1) proving acceptance of the GL and (2) demonstrating satisfactory psychometric properties of its scores in student populations. [less ▲]

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See detailIntelligence as assessed by modern computer-based problem solving scenarios
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2012)

Computer-based problem solving scenarios—so-called microworlds—have often been suggested as promising alternative assessment instruments of intelligence. Potential benefits compared to traditional paper ... [more ▼]

Computer-based problem solving scenarios—so-called microworlds—have often been suggested as promising alternative assessment instruments of intelligence. Potential benefits compared to traditional paper-pencil tests involve tracking of students’ mental representations of the problems as well as their problem solving strategies by means of behavioral data. Though, it is still topic of ongoing debate whether the skills assessed by such microworlds are distinct from or identical to the construct of intelligence as measured by conventional reasoning tests. To address this issue, we thoroughly investigated construct and incremental validity of a recently developed microworld, the Genetics Lab (Sonnleitner et. al, 2011). We obtained data from a multilingual and representative Luxembourgish student sample (N = 563) who completed the Genetics Lab and 3 reasoning scales of an established intelligence test battery. Results of a Confirmatory Factor Analysis suggest that the construct assessed by the Genetics Lab is largely identical to the construct of intelligence as measured by traditional reasoning scales. Incremental validity was found with respect to the performance in a national assessment of students’ competencies and performance in the PISA study of 2009. Thus, the notion of microworlds to be a valuable measure of intelligence is supported. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Genetics Lab_Theoretical background & psychometric evaluation
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Report (2012)

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See detailLongitudinal predictors of early mathematics: Number-specific versus domain-general mechanisms?
Hornung, Caroline UL; Brunner, Martin; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2011, February 11)

Longitudinal predictors of early mathematics: Number-specific versus domain-general mechanisms? What is a good basis for developing mathematical competencies? While some authors propose that number ... [more ▼]

Longitudinal predictors of early mathematics: Number-specific versus domain-general mechanisms? What is a good basis for developing mathematical competencies? While some authors propose that number-specific abilities primarily contribute to early math development, other authors suggest that domain-general abilities are key. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Genetics Lab - A new Computer-Based Problem Solving Scenario to assess Intelligence
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2011)

Assessments of intelligence by means of paper-pencil tests faced several critiques that point to their lack of face validity, insufficient coverage of the definition of intelligence, their sensitivity to ... [more ▼]

Assessments of intelligence by means of paper-pencil tests faced several critiques that point to their lack of face validity, insufficient coverage of the definition of intelligence, their sensitivity to the emotional state of the test taker, and the danger of getting outdated. The present paper discusses to what extent these limitations can be overcome by computer-based problem solving scenarios–so-called microworlds. Generally speaking, microworlds are supposed to be highly accepted by test takers, to provide process measures by directly tracing problem solving behavior, and to realize game-like characteristics that may increase test motivation and reduce test anxiety. To capitalize on these potential advantages, we developed the microworld Genetics Lab that was completed by a large, heterogeneous sample of more than 600 Luxembourgish students. Performance scores were derived for students’ problem solving strategies as well as their mental problem representations–important cognitive data which are not accessible with typical paper-pencil tests. Analyses of the psychometric characteristics of the Genetics Lab empirically underscored the construct validity for the derived performance scores. For example, process oriented measures of strategy use were found to possess discriminant validity with respect to grades. Further, acceptance and induced test anxiety of the Genetics lab was explored relative to a paper-pencil measure of intelligence. Our results show that the Genetics Lab is a reliable and valid assessment instrument and emphasize the benefits of using microworlds for assessing intelligence. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing Intelligence for Education in the 21st Century: The Benefits of Microworlds
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2011)

Computer-based problem solving scenarios—so-called microworlds—are contemporary educational assessment instruments of intelligence that offer several benefits compared to traditional paper-pencil tests ... [more ▼]

Computer-based problem solving scenarios—so-called microworlds—are contemporary educational assessment instruments of intelligence that offer several benefits compared to traditional paper-pencil tests. This involves tracking of students’ mental representations of the problems as well as their problem solving strategies by means of behavioral data which provides key information for educational interventions. Moreover, microworlds realize game-like characteristics that may increase test motivation and reduce test anxiety. In the present study, the Genetics Lab, a newly developed microworld, was completed by a representative sample of more than 800 Luxembourgish students. Students chose among three different languages (German, French and English) in which the problem content of the Genetics Lab was presented. The present paper analyzes the psychometric properties of the various performance scores derived for the Genetics Lab with respect to their relations to school grades, and measurement invariance across gender, chosen test language, and migration background. Moreover, a direct comparison with traditional measures of intelligence demonstrated construct validity of the performance scores of the Genetics Lab. In sum, the results obtained for the Genetics Lab show the benefits of behavioral data obtained for computer-based problem-solving scenarios and support the notion of microworlds to be a valuable measure of intelligence. [less ▲]

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