References of "Brunner, Martin"
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See detailBetween‐school variation in students’ achievement, motivation, affect, and learning strategies: Results from 81 countries for planning group‐randomized trials in education
Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL; Wenger, Marina et al

in Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness (2018), 11(3), 452-478

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See detailValue-Added Modelling in Primary and Secondary School: An Integrative Review of 674 Publications
Levy, Jessica UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Brunner, Martin et al

Scientific Conference (2017, December)

Value-added (VA) modelling aims to quantify the effect of pedagogical actions on students’ achievement, independent of students’ backgrounds (e.g., [1]); in other words, VA strives to model the added ... [more ▼]

Value-added (VA) modelling aims to quantify the effect of pedagogical actions on students’ achievement, independent of students’ backgrounds (e.g., [1]); in other words, VA strives to model the added value of teaching. VA is typically used for teacher and/or school accountability (e.g., [2]). Although, VA models have gained popularity in recent years—a substantial increase of publications is to be observed over the last decade—, there is no consensus on how to calculate VA, nor is there a consensus whether and which covariates should be included in the statistical models (e.g., [3]). The aim of the present study is to conduct a to date non-existent integrative review on VA modelling in primary and secondary education. Starting with an exhaustive literature research in the ERIC, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Psyndex databases, we reviewed and thoroughly classified 674 VA publications from 32 different countries. Half of the studies investigated VA models at teacher level; the remaining looked at school or principal level. 370 studies used empirical data to calculate VA models. Most of these studies explained their covariates, but approximately 15% did not specify the model. Most studies used prior achievement as a covariate, but cognitive and/or motivational student data were almost never taken into consideration. Moreover, most of the studies did not adjust for methodological issues such as missing data or measurement error. To conclude, given the high relevance of VA—it is primarily used for high-stakes decisions— more transparency, rigor and consensus are needed, especially concerning methodological details. References [1] Braun, H. I. (2005). Using student progress to evaluate teachers: A primer on value-added models. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service. [2] Sanders, W. L. (2000). Value-added assessment from student achievement data: Opportunities and hurdles. Journal of Personnel Evaluation in Education, 14(4), 329–339. [3] Newton, X., Darling-Hammond, L., Haertel, E., & Thomas, E. (2010). Value-added modeling of teacher effectiveness: An exploration of stability across models and contexts. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 18(23). [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing Complex Problem Solving in the Classroom: Meeting Challenges and Opportunities
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Csapó, Beno; Funke, Joachim (Eds.) The Nature of Problem Solving. Using research to inspire 21st century learning (2017)

At the time when complex problem solving was established as a key aspect of today’s educational curricula and a central competence of international assessment frameworks like PISA, it became evident that ... [more ▼]

At the time when complex problem solving was established as a key aspect of today’s educational curricula and a central competence of international assessment frameworks like PISA, it became evident that the educational context places special demands on assessment instruments used for this purpose. In this chapter, we show how these challenges can successfully be addressed by reviewing recent advancements in the field of complex problem solving. We use the example of the Genetics Lab, a newly developed and psychometrically sound microworld which emphasizes usability and acceptance amongst students, to discuss challenges and opportunities of assessing complex problem solving in the classroom. [less ▲]

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See detailExtension procedures for confirmatory factor analysis.
Nagy, Gabriel; Brunner, Martin; Lüdtke, Oliver et al

in The Journal of Experimental Education (2017), 85(4), 574-596

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See detailShort-term and medium-term effects of grade retention in secondary school on academic achievement and psychosocial outcome variables
Klapproth, Florian; Schaltz, Paule UL; Brunner, Martin et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2016), 50

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See detailSolving arithmetic problems in first and second language: Does the language context matter?
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Schiltz, Christine UL; Brunner, Martin et al

in Learning and instruction (2016)

Learning mathematics in a second language is a challenge for many learners. The purpose of the study was to provide new insights into the role of the language context in mathematic learning and more ... [more ▼]

Learning mathematics in a second language is a challenge for many learners. The purpose of the study was to provide new insights into the role of the language context in mathematic learning and more particularly arithmetic problem solving. We investigated this question in a GermaneFrench bilingual educational setting in Luxembourg. Participants with increasing bilingual proficiency levels were invited to solve additions in both their first and second instruction languages: German and French. Arithmetic problems were presented in two different conditions: preceded by a semantic judgment or without additional language context. In the French session we observed that additions were systematically performed faster in the condition with an additional language context. In contrast no effect of the context was observed in the German session. In conclusion, providing a language context enhanced arithmetic performances in bilinguals' second instruction language. This finding entails implications for designing optimal mathematic learning environments in multilingual educational settings. [less ▲]

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See detailSpeaking two languages with different number naming systems: What implications for magnitude judgments in bilinguals at different stages of language acquisition?
Van Rinsveld, Amandine; Schiltz, Christine UL; Landerl, Karin et al

in Cognitive processing (2016), 17(3), 225-41

Differences between languages in terms of number naming systems may lead to performance differences in number processing. The current study focused on differences concerning the order of decades and units ... [more ▼]

Differences between languages in terms of number naming systems may lead to performance differences in number processing. The current study focused on differences concerning the order of decades and units in two-digit number words (i.e., unit-decade order in German but decade-unit order in French) and how they affect number magnitude judgments. Participants performed basic numerical tasks, namely two-digit number magnitude judgments, and we used the compatibility effect (Nuerk et al. in Cognition 82(1):B25-B33, 2001) as a hallmark of language influence on numbers. In the first part we aimed to understand the influence of language on compatibility effects in adults coming from German or French monolingual and German-French bilingual groups (Experiment 1). The second part examined how this language influence develops at different stages of language acquisition in individuals with increasing bilingual proficiency (Experiment 2). Language systematically influenced magnitude judgments such that: (a) The spoken language(s) modulated magnitude judgments presented as Arabic digits, and (b) bilinguals' progressive language mastery impacted magnitude judgments presented as number words. Taken together, the current results suggest that the order of decades and units in verbal numbers may qualitatively influence magnitude judgments in bilinguals and monolinguals, providing new insights into how number processing can be influenced by language(s). [less ▲]

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See detailComplex Problem Solving Provides a Fairer Picture of Multilingual Students’ Cognitive Potential
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2015, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (3 UL)
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See detailPISA-Kompetenzwerte sagen Bildungserträge voraus
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Preckel, Franzis et al

Scientific Conference (2014, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (6 UL)
See detailDo teacher judgments of student intelligence predict students' intelligence forty years later? Results from the Luxembourg MAGRIP study
Brunner, Martin; Fischbach, Antoine UL

in International Max Planck Research School on the Life Course newsletter (2014), 8(2), 3-8

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (17 UL)
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See detailLes scores de compétences PISA sont prédictifs des résultats et carrières scolaires
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Preckel, Franzis et al

Poster (2014, June)

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See detailLes jugements des enseignants sur l’intelligence des élèves sont prédictifs de la qualité de vie à long terme
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis et al

Scientific Conference (2014, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (6 UL)
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See detailOthers don´t like me if I am good at school? Reciprocal effects of adolescents’ academic and social self-concepts
Preckel, Franzis; Niepel, Christoph UL; Brunner, Martin

Scientific Conference (2014, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (3 UL)
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See detailChronotype und Schule: Zusammenhänge zu Leistung und affektiv-motivationalen Variablen
Preckel, Franzis; Tanja Gabriele, Baudson; Brunner, Martin et al

Scientific Conference (2014, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 151 (8 UL)
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See detailData processing, analyses and reporting
Lorphelin, Dalia UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

in Fischbach, Antoine; Ugen, Sonja; Martin, Romain (Eds.) ÉpStan Technical Report (2014)

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See detailDifferential relations between facets of complex problem solving and students’ immigration background
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2014), Advance online publication

Whereas the assessment of complex problem solving (CPS) has received increasing attention in the context of international large-scale assessments, its fairness in regard to students’ cultural background ... [more ▼]

Whereas the assessment of complex problem solving (CPS) has received increasing attention in the context of international large-scale assessments, its fairness in regard to students’ cultural background has gone largely unexplored. On the basis of a student sample of ninth-graders (N = 299), including a representative number of immigrant students (N = 127), the present study evaluated (1) whether CPS can be assessed fairly among students with or without immigration background and (2) whether achievement differences between these groups exist. Results showed that fair assessment of CPS is possible using the Genetics Lab, a computer-based microworld that incorporates game-like characteristics and multilingual-friendly features. Immigrant students were generally outperformed by their non-immigrant peers, but performance differences can largely be explained by differential enrollment in lower academic tracks. Interestingly, CPS scales were less affected by students’ educational background than a traditional paper-pencil-based reasoning scale. Moreover, a fine-grained analysis of different facets of CPS showed that irrespective of the academic track, immigrant students demonstrated a more efficient task exploration behavior than their native peers (d = .26). In sum, this might point to the potential of computer-based assessment of CPS to identify otherwise hidden cognitive potential in immigrant students. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 221 (35 UL)