References of "Bordas, Stéphane 50000969"
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See detailOn the convergence of stresses in fretting fatigue
Pereira, Kyvia; Bordas, Stéphane UL; Tomar, Satyendra UL et al

in Materials (2016), 9(8),

Fretting is a phenomenon that occurs at the contacts of surfaces that are subjected to oscillatory relative movement of small amplitudes. Depending on service conditions, fretting may significantly reduce ... [more ▼]

Fretting is a phenomenon that occurs at the contacts of surfaces that are subjected to oscillatory relative movement of small amplitudes. Depending on service conditions, fretting may significantly reduce the service life of a component due to fretting fatigue. In this regard, the analysis of stresses at contact is of great importance for predicting the lifetime of components. However, due to the complexity of the fretting phenomenon, analytical solutions are available for very selective situations and finite element (FE) analysis has become an attractive tool to evaluate stresses and to study fretting problems. Recent laboratory studies in fretting fatigue suggested the presence of stress singularities in the stick-slip zone. In this paper, we constructed finite element models, with different element sizes, in order to verify the existence of stress singularity under fretting conditions. Based on our results, we did not find any singularity for the considered loading conditions and coefficients of friction. Since no singularity was found, the present paper also provides some comments regarding the convergence rate. Our analyses showed that the convergence rate in stress components depends on coefficient of friction, implying that this rate also depends on the loading condition. It was also observed that errors can be relatively high for cases with a high coefficient of friction, suggesting the importance of mesh refinement in these situations. Although the accuracy of the FE analysis is very important for satisfactory predictions, most of the studies in the literature rarely provide information regarding the level of error in simulations. Thus, some recommendations of mesh sizes for those who wish to perform FE analysis of fretting problems are provided for different levels of accuracy. [less ▲]

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See detailReducing non-linear PDEs using a reduced integration proper orthogonal decomposition method
Schenone, Elisa; Hale, Jack UL; Beex, Lars UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016)

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See detailStable 3D extended finite elements with higher order enrichment for accurate non planar fracture
Agathos, Konstantinos UL; Chatzi, Eleni; Bordas, Stéphane UL

in Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering (2016), 306

An extended finite element method (XFEM) for three dimensional (3D) non-planar linear elastic fracture is introduced, which provides optimal convergence through the use of enrichment in a fixed area ... [more ▼]

An extended finite element method (XFEM) for three dimensional (3D) non-planar linear elastic fracture is introduced, which provides optimal convergence through the use of enrichment in a fixed area around the crack front, while also improving the conditioning of the resulting system matrices. This is achieved by fusing a novel form of enrichment with existing blending techniques. Further, the adoption of higher order terms of theWilliams expansion is also considered and the effects in the accuracy and conditioning of the method are studied. Moreover, some problems regarding the evaluation of stress intensity factors (SIFs) and element partitioning are dealt with. The accuracy and convergence properties of the method as well as the conditioning of the resulting stiffness matrices are investigated through the use of appropriate benchmark problems. It is shown that the proposed approach provides increased accuracy while requiring, for all cases considered, a reduced number of iterations for the solution of the resulting systems of equations. The positive impact of geometrical enrichment is further demonstrated in the accuracy of the computed SIFs where, for the examined cases, an improvement of up to 40% is achieved. [less ▲]

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See detailA fast, certified and "tuning free" two-field reduced basis method for the metamodelling of affinely-parametrised elasticity problems
Hoang, K. C.; Kerfriden, P.; Bordas, Stéphane UL

in Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering (2016), 298

This paper proposes a new reduced basis algorithm for the metamodelling of parametrised elliptic problems. The developments rely on the Constitutive Relation Error (CRE), and the construction of separate ... [more ▼]

This paper proposes a new reduced basis algorithm for the metamodelling of parametrised elliptic problems. The developments rely on the Constitutive Relation Error (CRE), and the construction of separate reduced order models for the primal variable (displacement) and flux (stress) fields. A two field greedy sampling strategy is proposed to construct these two fields simultaneously and in an efficient manner: at each iteration, one of the two fields is enriched by increasing the dimension of its reduced space in such a way that the CRE is minimised. This sampling strategy is then used as a basis to construct goal-oriented reduced order modelling. The resulting algorithm is certified and “tuning free”: the only requirement from the engineer is the level of accuracy that is desired for each of the outputs of the surrogate. It is also shown to be significantly more efficient in terms of computational expense than competing methodologies. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Bayesian inference to recover the material parameters of a heterogeneous hyperelastic body
Hale, Jack UL; Farrell, Patrick; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Scientific Conference (2016)

We present a method for calculating a Bayesian uncertainty estimate on the recovered material parameters of a heterogeneous geometrically non-linear hyperelastic body. We formulate the problem in the ... [more ▼]

We present a method for calculating a Bayesian uncertainty estimate on the recovered material parameters of a heterogeneous geometrically non-linear hyperelastic body. We formulate the problem in the Bayesian inference framework [1]; given noisy and sparse observations of a body, some prior knowledge on the parameters and a parameter-to-observable map the goal is to recover the posterior distribution of the parameters given the observations. In this work we primarily focus on the challenges of developing dimension-independent algorithms in the context of very large inverse problems (tens to hundreds of thousands of parameters). Critical to the success of the method is viewing the problem in the correct infinite- dimensional function space setting [2]. With this goal in mind, we show the use of automatic symbolic differentiation techniques to construct high-order adjoint models [3], scalable maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators, and efficient low-rank update methods to calculate credible regions on the posterior distribution [4]. [less ▲]

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See detailModelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements
Nguyen, Viet Ha UL; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane UL et al

in Computational Mechanics (2016), 58(5), 731-746

Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these ... [more ▼]

Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced order method combined with domain decomposition
Baroli, Davide UL; Bordas, Stéphane UL; Beex, Lars UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016)

The complexities and nonlinearity of the PDEs in biomechanics and the requirement for rapid solution pose significant challenges for the biomedical applications. For these reasons, different methods for ... [more ▼]

The complexities and nonlinearity of the PDEs in biomechanics and the requirement for rapid solution pose significant challenges for the biomedical applications. For these reasons, different methods for reducing the complexity and solving efficiently have been investigated in the last 15 years. At the state-ofart, due to spatial different behaviours and highly accurate simulation required, a decomposition of physical domain is deeply investigated in reduced basis element method approaches. In this talk, the main focus is devoted to present suitable reduction strategy which combines a domain decomposition approach and a proper interface management with a proper orthogonal decomposition. We provide numerical tests implemented in DOLFIN[4] using SLEPc [3] and PETSc [1, 2] that show a speed up in forward runtime model. [less ▲]

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See detailHybrid mesh/particle meshless method for modeling geological flows with discontinuous transport properties
Bourantas, Georgios UL; Lavier, Luc; van Dam, Tonie UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2016)

In the present paper, we introduce the Finite Difference Method-Meshless Method (FDM-MM) in the context of geodynamical simulations. The proposed numerical scheme relies on the well-established FD method ... [more ▼]

In the present paper, we introduce the Finite Difference Method-Meshless Method (FDM-MM) in the context of geodynamical simulations. The proposed numerical scheme relies on the well-established FD method along with the newly developed “meshless” method and, is considered as a hybrid Eulerian/Lagrangian scheme. Mass, momentum, and energy equations are solved using an FDM method, while material properties are distributed over a set of markers (particles), which represent the spatial domain, with the solution interpolated back to the Eulerian grid. The proposed scheme is capable of solving flow equations (Stokes flow) in uniform geometries with particles, “sprinkled” in the spatial domain and is used to solve convection- diffusion problems avoiding the oscillation produced in the Eulerian approach. The resulting algebraic linear systems were solved using direct solvers. Our hybrid approach can capture sharp variations of stresses and thermal gradients in problems with a strongly variable viscosity and thermal conductivity as demonstrated through various benchmarking test cases. The present hybrid approach allows for the accurate calculation of fine thermal structures, offering local type adaptivity through the flexibility of the particle method. [less ▲]

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See detailC++ implementation of 2D PHT splines
Peng, Xuan; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Learning material (2016)

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See detailDiscrete mechanical models and upscaling techniques for discrete materials
Beex, Lars UL; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Poster (2016)

Numerous natural and man-made materials are essentially discrete structures at the mesoscale or microscale (see Fig. 1). Discrete mechanical models can be formulated to capture typical mechanical ... [more ▼]

Numerous natural and man-made materials are essentially discrete structures at the mesoscale or microscale (see Fig. 1). Discrete mechanical models can be formulated to capture typical mechanical phenomena arising from this discreteness. Failure in these materials, which often starts with the fracture of an individual bond, can be predicted based on the small-scale mechanics with these models. For failure, but also for non-local mechanics, no phenomenological descriptions are required in these models. This makes them more predictive than constitutive material models for this type of materials. [less ▲]

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See detailImplementation of regularized isogeometric boundary element methods for gradient-based shape optimization in two-dimensional linear elasticity
Haojie, Lian; Pierre, Kerfriden; Bordas, Stéphane UL

in International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering (2015)

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See detailMulti-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety
Bordas, Stéphane UL; Beex, Lars UL; Kerfriden, Pierre et al

Scientific Conference (2015, November 18)

Authors: S. P. A. Bordas, L. A. A. Beex, P. Kerfriden, D. A. Paladim, O. Goury, A. Akbari, H. Rappel  Multi-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety ... [more ▼]

Authors: S. P. A. Bordas, L. A. A. Beex, P. Kerfriden, D. A. Paladim, O. Goury, A. Akbari, H. Rappel  Multi-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety Fracture and material instabilities originate at spatial scales much smaller than that of the structure of interest: delamination, debonding, fibre breakage, cell-wall buckling, are examples of nano/micro or meso-scale mechanisms which can lead to global failure of the material and structure. Such mechanisms cannot, for computational and practical reasons, be accounted at structural scale, so that acceleration methods are necessary.  We review in this presentation recently proposed approaches to reduce the computational expense associated with multi-scale modelling of fracture. In light of two particular examples, we show connections between algebraic reduction (model order reduction and quasi-continuum methods) and homogenisation-based reduction. We open the discussion towards suitable approaches for machine-learning and Bayesian statistical based multi-scale model selection. Such approaches could fuel a digital-twin concept enabling models to learn from real-time data acquired during the life of the structure, accounting for “real” environmental conditions during predictions, and, eventually, moving beyond the “factors of safety” era. [less ▲]

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See detailMulti-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety
: primer on Bayesian Inference
Bordas, Stéphane UL; Hale, Jack UL; Beex, Lars UL et al

Speeches/Talks (2015)

Fracture and material instabilities originate at spatial scales much smaller than that of the structure of interest: delamination, debonding, fibre break- age, cell-wall buckling, are examples of nano ... [more ▼]

Fracture and material instabilities originate at spatial scales much smaller than that of the structure of interest: delamination, debonding, fibre break- age, cell-wall buckling, are examples of nano/micro or meso-scale mechanisms which can lead to global failure of the material and structure. Such mech- anisms cannot, for computational and practical reasons, be accounted at structural scale, so that acceleration methods are necessary. We review in this presentation recently proposed approaches to reduce the computational expense associated with multi-scale modelling of frac- ture. In light of two particular examples, we show connections between algebraic reduction (model order reduction and quasi-continuum methods) and homogenisation-based reduction. We open the discussion towards suitable approaches for machine-learning and Bayesian statistical based multi-scale model selection. Such approaches could fuel a digital-twin concept enabling models to learn from real-time data acquired during the life of the structure, accounting for “real” environmental conditions during predictions, and, eventually, moving beyond the era of factors of safety. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Bayes' theorem to infer the material parameters of human soft tissue
Hale, Jack UL; Farrell, Patrick; Bordas, Stéphane UL

Presentation (2015, October 21)

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See detailIsogeometric boundary element methods for three dimensional fatigue crack growth
Peng, Xuan; Atroshchenko, Elena; Kerfriden, Pierre et al

Report (2015)

The isogeometric boundary element method (IGABEM) based on NURBS is adopted to model fracture problem in 3D. The NURBS basis functions are used in both crack representation and physical quantity ... [more ▼]

The isogeometric boundary element method (IGABEM) based on NURBS is adopted to model fracture problem in 3D. The NURBS basis functions are used in both crack representation and physical quantity approximation. A stable quadrature scheme for singular integration is proposed to enhance the robustness of the method in dealing with highly distorted element. The convergence study in crack opening displacement is performed for penny-shaped crack and elliptical crack. Two ways to extract stress intensity factors (SIFs), the contour $M$ integral and virtual crack closure integral, are implemented based on the framework of dual integral equations. An algorithm is outlined and validated to be stable for fatigue crack growth, thanks to the smoothness not only in crack geometry but also in stress/SIFs solution brought by IGABEM. [less ▲]

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See detailHigher-order quasicontinuum methods for elastic and dissipative lattice models: uniaxial deformation and pure bending
Beex, Lars UL; Rokos, Ondrej; Zeman, Jan et al

in GAMM Mitteilungen (2015), 38(2), 344-368

The quasicontinuum (QC) method is a numerical strategy to reduce the computational cost of direct lattice computations - in this study we achieve a speed up of a factor of 40. It has successfully been ... [more ▼]

The quasicontinuum (QC) method is a numerical strategy to reduce the computational cost of direct lattice computations - in this study we achieve a speed up of a factor of 40. It has successfully been applied to (conservative) atomistic lattices in the past, but using a virtual-power-statement it was recently shown that QC approaches can also be used for spring and beam lattice models that include dissipation. Recent results have shown that QC approaches for planar beam lattices experiencing in-plane and out-of-plane deformation require higher-order interpolation. Higher-order QC frameworks are scarce nevertheless. In this contribution, the possibilities of a second-order and third-order QC framework are investigated for an elastoplastic spring lattice. The higher-order QC frameworks are compared to the results of the direct lattice computations and to those of a linear QC scheme. Examples are chosen so that both a macroscale and a microscale quantity influences the results. The two multiscale examples focused on are (i) macroscopically prescribed uniaxial deformation and (ii) macroscopically prescribed pure bending. Furthermore, the examples include an individual inclusion in a large lattice and hence, are concurrent in nature. [less ▲]

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See detailOpen-Cell Aluminium Foams with Graded Coatings as Passively Controllable Energy Absorbers
Jung, Anne; Beex, Lars UL; Diebels, Stefan et al

in Materials and Design (2015), 87

Compared to most bulk materials, open-cell aluminium (Al) foams (OCAFs) are light-weight and can absorb a significant amount of energy in compression, e.g. during impact.When coatedwith nickel (Ni), OCAFs ... [more ▼]

Compared to most bulk materials, open-cell aluminium (Al) foams (OCAFs) are light-weight and can absorb a significant amount of energy in compression, e.g. during impact.When coatedwith nickel (Ni), OCAFs can absorb even more energy, making them more appropriate for impacts at higher velocities than uncoated OCAFs. When Ni-coated OCAFs experience low-velocity impact however, the stopping distance during the impact is small compared to that of uncoated OCAFs and hence, deceleration occurs fast. This exposes devices (and possibly human beings) protected by OCAFs to large internal forces leading to internal damage. An OCAF that combines the properties of uncoated and coated OCAFs can absorb energy during both low-velocity and high-velocity impact scenarios. This contribution introduces two of such OCAFs which are created by partially and gradually coating OCAFs. The general mechanics of the two OCAFs are revealed using experimental and numerical observation methods. [less ▲]

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See detailIsogeometric and multi-scale fracture
Bordas, Stéphane UL

Presentation (2015, July 31)

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See detailScale selection in nonlinear fracture mechanics of heterogeneous materials
Akbari Rahimabadi, Ahmad; Kerfriden, Pierre; Bordas, Stéphane UL

in Philosophical Magazine (2015), 95(28-30), 3328-3347

A new adaptive multiscale method for the non-linear fracture simulation of heterogeneous materials is proposed. The two major sources of errors in the finite element simulation are discretization and ... [more ▼]

A new adaptive multiscale method for the non-linear fracture simulation of heterogeneous materials is proposed. The two major sources of errors in the finite element simulation are discretization and modelling errors. In the failure problems, the discretization error increases due to the strain localization which is also a source for the error in the homogenization of the underlying microstructure. In this paper, the discretization error is controlled by an adaptive mesh refinement procedure following the Zienkiewicz–Zhu technique, and the modelling error, which is the resultant of homogenization of microstructure, is controlled by replacing the macroscopic model with the underlying heterogeneous microstructure. The scale adaptation criterion which is based on an error indicator for homogenization is employed for our non-linear fracture problem. The control of both discretization and homogenization errors is the main feature of the proposed multiscale method. [less ▲]

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