References of "Albert, Isabelle 50000108"
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See detailBecause I need them, because I don’t: Regulation of family relations between adult children and their parents
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Poster (2017, August)

The world’s demography has evolved requiring policy makers and practitioners all over the world to face in the next years important issues specifically related to the steadily increasing migration. Only ... [more ▼]

The world’s demography has evolved requiring policy makers and practitioners all over the world to face in the next years important issues specifically related to the steadily increasing migration. Only few studies have, however, focused on the regulation of relations between adult children and their ageing parents in host national compared to immigrant families. Migrant families might be confronted with specific tasks. While the acculturation situation might give rise to an increased need for intergenerational support, an acculturation gap between both generations can potentially lead to different expectations. Adult children from immigrant families might, for instance, be subject to the experience of ambivalent or conflictual feelings regarding the desire to become independent from their parents; at the same time, they may feel the urge to conform to parental expectations or to support their parents in accordance to the values of their parents’ culture of origin. However, older parents may also undergo changes in their perception of intergenerational support and lower their expectations in the process of acculturation. A qualitative cross-cultural comparison is conducted of n = 10 Portuguese and n = 10 Luxembourgish dyadic interviews of older parents and their adult children, both living in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. We will focus on different key issues regarding the regulation of intergenerational family relations between first and second generations of host nationals and immigrants focussing on processes such as interdependent and independent selfconstrual comparing both cultural groups and both generations. First analyses show a heightened importance of geographical proximity in Portuguese migrant families compared to Luxembourgish native families for family relations. Likewise, regular interactions appear to be more required, needed and expected in Portuguese migrant families, especially from the parents while this is only to some extent, supported by their children. [less ▲]

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See detailChanging (multi-)cultural contexts through the lense of the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in 9th European IACCP Conference - Program and the book of abstracts (2017, July 17)

Using the natural laboratory of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 47% as case study example, we outline the diversification of diversity. The immigrant population is increasingly heterogeneous in ... [more ▼]

Using the natural laboratory of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 47% as case study example, we outline the diversification of diversity. The immigrant population is increasingly heterogeneous in terms of countries of origin, length of stay/ generation status, economic participation and acculturation choices. Who is a Luxembourger is increasingly difficult to define and minority or majority becomes ever more fluid. Empirical findings concerning the attitude of the receiving society towards multiculturalism will be presented including implications for national identification. We aim to shed light on inter-individual differences in terms of views on immigration among the receiving society, also taking into consideration regional demographic differences. We draw on two different samples, one from the center of Luxembourg (N = 507), where the native population is in the minority and a more regionally diversified sample (N = 238). Similarities and differences will be highlighted and implications discussed. [less ▲]

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See detail“It is in giving that we receive, isn’t it?” – Intergenerational family solidarity, reciprocity and subjective well-being in the context of migration.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 17)

Research on intergenerational relations has underlined the importance of reciprocity in the regulation of support exchange. The VOC study has demonstrated cross-cultural differences in reciprocity and ... [more ▼]

Research on intergenerational relations has underlined the importance of reciprocity in the regulation of support exchange. The VOC study has demonstrated cross-cultural differences in reciprocity and effects on subjective well-being. Less is known regarding migrant families as intergenerational support patterns could differ from host families due to specific needs or depending on different value orientations and family norms. Here, we focus therefore on the role of reciprocity in intergenerational family support in a sample of altogether N = 152 Luxembourgish and Portuguese (young) adults and their parents, all living in Luxembourg. In general, parents reported providing more social support for their children than they receive; but PT compared to LUX children reported providing as much social support as they receive from their parents. Results will be discussed within an integrative model on intergenerational family relations in the light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational relationship regulation in the light of migration and ageing: The case of (young) adult children and their parents from Portuguese immigrant and Luxembourgish families.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 14)

The negotiation of autonomy and relatedness in the relations between children and their parents constitutes a key topic of intergenerational relationship regulation over the whole family life cycle. In ... [more ▼]

The negotiation of autonomy and relatedness in the relations between children and their parents constitutes a key topic of intergenerational relationship regulation over the whole family life cycle. In the context of migration, an acculturation gap between parents and their adult children might lead to different identity constructions and mutual expectations with regard to intergenerational solidarity and support. These differences in expectations and beliefs can affect relationship quality between the family members from different generations as well as their well-being. In the present study, we focus on a sample of altogether N = 152 Luxembourgish and Portuguese (young) adults and their parents from immigrant and Luxembourgish families, all living in Luxembourg. Portuguese adult children were born resp. had grown up in Luxembourg. First results show a high cohesion in both Portuguese immigrant and luxembourgish families; however, enmeshment and normative expectations regarding adult children’s support for their ageing parents were higher in Portuguese families. The findings further suggest that ambivalence might be experienced in particular when individual striving for independence seems difficult to reconcile with norms of family obligation. Implications for well-being of family members from both generations will be discussed taking into account an integrative model on intergenerational family relations in the light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticulturalism in Luxembourg: Challenges and opportunities.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Lorente, Sandy; Hoffmann, Martine et al

Scientific Conference (2017, July 14)

An unprecedented number of first generation immigrants will approach retirement age. Two projects from Luxembourg are presented: the FNR-funded project on "Intergenerational Relations in the light of ... [more ▼]

An unprecedented number of first generation immigrants will approach retirement age. Two projects from Luxembourg are presented: the FNR-funded project on "Intergenerational Relations in the light of Migration and Ageing” with focus on the ageing Portuguese migrants, and a pilot field project focusing on bringing together elderly people with different social and cultural background by an Intercultural walking group. [less ▲]

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See detailLuxembourgish national identity and natives’ perception of immigrants
Barros, Stephanie; Roth, Kiara; Albert, Isabelle UL et al

Poster (2017, July)

Migration is an important issue nowadays even more so in the light of the growing antimigrant attitudes we are currently witnessing all over the world. Luxemburg’s history, as many other countries, is ... [more ▼]

Migration is an important issue nowadays even more so in the light of the growing antimigrant attitudes we are currently witnessing all over the world. Luxemburg’s history, as many other countries, is also shaped by important migration waves as well as a growing national consciousness. It is therefore crucial to delve deeper into the way foreigners are perceived by natives in countries with dense immigrant populations. In the present study, we will have a closer look on the perceived threat from Luxembourgish natives’ viewpoint (N = 227; Mage = 37.2, SD = 14.9; range: 16-74; 59% of girls) regarding immigrants in general that could in a long-term perspective favour hostile attitudes towards foreigners. First analyses have showed that commitment to the own national identity, sense of security, satisfaction with current life and a higher proportion of non-Luxembourgish individuals within the circle of friends and own family are related with a lower perceived threat. [less ▲]

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See detail“I feel more Luxembourgish, but Portuguese too…” - “What country does have just one culture anyway?” Cultural identities in a Luxembourgish multicultural society
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July)

Migration is a key topic of the contemporary world, so is the concept of cultural identity that has gained more importance with the growing culturally diverse societies. Here, children of migrants usually ... [more ▼]

Migration is a key topic of the contemporary world, so is the concept of cultural identity that has gained more importance with the growing culturally diverse societies. Here, children of migrants usually find themselves in a particular situation as they are confronted to different value systems and cultures. How do these so-called second generation children experience and construct their identities growing up in a diverse cultural context? In the present study, we will have a closer look at aspects of acculturation of Portuguese migrant families living in Luxembourg by use of a standardized questionnaire (n = 55 PT migrant triads) and qualitative interviews (n = 10 migrant family dyads). We will focus on the dealing with multiple cultural identities, cultural attachment to host and home country. We will therefore compare first and second generations from PT migrant families to assess differences or similarities in their identity constructions in the Luxembourgish multicultural arena. [less ▲]

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See detailAmbivalenzerfahrungen im Kontext der Individuation im jungen Erwachsenenalter: Autonomie und Verbundenheit in portugiesischen und luxemburgischen Familien in Luxemburg.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, June 23)

Es wird im Allgemeinen angenommen, dass Phasen des Übergangs in Eltern-Kind-Beziehungen besonders von Ambivalenzerfahrungen geprägt sein können. Das junge Erwachsenenalter als eine solche Phase der ... [more ▼]

Es wird im Allgemeinen angenommen, dass Phasen des Übergangs in Eltern-Kind-Beziehungen besonders von Ambivalenzerfahrungen geprägt sein können. Das junge Erwachsenenalter als eine solche Phase der Transition ist dabei gekennzeichnet durch die Aushandlung von Autonomie und Verbundenheit, die gerade im Zusammenhang mit einem verlängerten Übergang vom Jugend- ins Erwachsenenalter, wie er durch das Konzept der «emerging adulthood» (Arnett 2000) beschrieben wird, an Bedeutung gewinnt. Ein wichtiges Ereignis stellt hier zweifelsohne der Auszug aus dem Elternhaus dar, der aber nicht unbedingt mit einer vollständigen finanziellen oder emotionalen Unabhängigkeit einhergehen muss. Im Rahmen des vom FNR geförderten Projekts IRMA («Intergenerational Relations in the light of Migration and Ageing») wurden insgesamt 20 qualitative Interviews mit im Grossherzogtum Luxemburg lebenden luxemburgischen und portugiesischen Eltern-Kind-Dyaden im jungen Erwachsenenalter durchgeführt. Die portugiesischen jungen Erwachsenen waren in Luxemburg aufgewachsen, wohingegen ihre Eltern in früheren Jahren eingewandert waren. Anhand der Analyse einer Interviewsequenz, die sich mit dem Auszug aus dem Elternhaus befasst, konnten in einer Inhaltsanalyse mehrere Themenbereiche herausgearbeitet werden, nämlich Bedürfnisse nach Autonomie und Verbundenheit, Kontakthäufigkeit nach dem Auszug, geographische Nähe oder Distanz sowie die Kohäsion innerhalb der Familie. Dabei stellte sich heraus, dass Unterschiede zwischen portugiesischen und luxemburgischen Familien in der Art der Beziehungsregulation bestehen, die auch mit einem unterschiedlichen Auftreten von Ambivalenzen verbunden sein könnten. Die Ergebnisse werden im Hinblick auf die Rolle von Ambivalenz als Katalysator für die Beziehungsregulation sowie mögliche Kulturunterschiede im Erleben und Umgang mit Ambivalenzen zwischen jungen Erwachsenen und ihren Eltern diskutiert. [less ▲]

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See detailLes immigrants portugais au Luxembourg : Projets futurs et bien-être
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, March 01)

Actuellement, dans plusieurs pays européens, les immigrants de la première génération se rapprochent de l’âge de la retraite, confrontant ainsi prochainement les sociétés occidentales aux besoins ... [more ▼]

Actuellement, dans plusieurs pays européens, les immigrants de la première génération se rapprochent de l’âge de la retraite, confrontant ainsi prochainement les sociétés occidentales aux besoins émergents des futurs pensionnés immigrants et de leur famille. Au Luxembourg, à ce jour, la communauté portugaise représente le groupe migrant le plus important (16 % de la population totale). En 2011, près de 14% de la population totale était recensé comme étant âgé de plus de 65 ans, dont 3.7% de Portugais. Peu de recherches ont été menées concernant les projets futurs de ces immigrants portugais ainsi que des attentes mutuelles entre générations familiales. Dans notre étude nous nous concentrons sur (1) les projets futurs du retour migratoire des immigrants portugais âgés, (2) les caractéristiques des différents groupes (a)rester au Luxembourg, b) retourner au Portugal, c) alterner entre les deux pays) et (3) les stratégies d’autorégulation de chaque groupe en considérant le contrôle primaire et secondaire, la satisfaction de vie ainsi que le soutien intergénérationnel entre parents migrants âgés et leurs enfants adultes. L’étude présentée fait partie du projet IRMA (« Intergenerational Relations in the light of Migration and Ageing »), qui s’intéresse aux relations entre les enfants adultes et leurs parents âgés, en comparant des familles PT à des familles LU, toutes résidentes du Luxembourg. Seules les données concernant la génération des parents PT ont été utilisées pour la présente étude. Les participants, au nombre de N = 125 et âgés entre 41 et 80 ans (51.2% de femmes), ont été interrogés à l’aide d’un questionnaire standardisé (PT et FR). Tous les participants sont nés au Portugal, mais vivent au Luxembourg depuis en moyenne M = 31.36 ans (SD = 8.66). Les résultats démontrent la diversité au sein du groupe des immigrants. Les raisons d’un éventuel retour s’avèrent être de nature plutôt personnelle/individuelle, liées aux aspects du style de vie ainsi qu’à un sentiment d’identité culturelle étroitement associé au pays d’origine ; les motifs pour rester au Luxembourg ou alterner sont quant à eux plutôt sociaux/familiaux et pratiques. La venue de petits-enfants ainsi que le lieu de vie des enfants adultes semblent influencer la décision finale, laissant entrevoir l’importance des relations et du soutien intergénérationnels. La participation et le dévouement au pays d’accueil et le choix de rester peuvent aussi grandir au fur et à mesure des années passées dans ce pays. Les programmes pour la prévention de la santé et la promotion du bien-être devraient être plus étroitement adaptés aux besoins, souhaits et idéaux des immigrants âgés, tout en prenant en considération la question de savoir où ils veulent habiter dans le futur et pourquoi ainsi que le système de soutien intrafamiliale mis en place par les familles elles-mêmes. Les résultats seront davantage discutés et élaborés en vue d’éventuels futurs programmes de prévention et de soutien. [less ▲]

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See detailFamily cultures in the context of migration and ageing
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2017), 51(2), 205-222

Intergenerational family relations are embedded in family cultures which influence how families regulate their relations over the whole life span with regard to key issues, such as autonomy and ... [more ▼]

Intergenerational family relations are embedded in family cultures which influence how families regulate their relations over the whole life span with regard to key issues, such as autonomy and relatedness, or support exchange and reciprocity, and which may vary inter- and intraculturally. Migrant families undoubtedly face a special situation as values and expectations from the culture of origin and from the host cultural context might differ. Not much is known yet about how migrant families adapt their family cultures to the host cultural context. The present article will focus on aspects of intergenerational family regulation by taking into account family cultures of migrant compared to non-migrant families in a life span perspective. We will illustrate our theoretical outline by presenting first results from the IRMA-study comparing Luxembourgish and Portuguese immigrant families living in Luxembourg. We focus on issues of family cohesion, enmeshment and normative expectations regarding adult children’s support for their ageing parents, by drawing both on quantitative questionnaire as well as qualitative interview data. Implications for the experience of ambivalence and conflicts as well as well-being of family members from both generations will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailObituary: Dieter Ferring (1958-2017)
Albert, Isabelle UL; Boll, Thomas UL; Lang, Frieder R.

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2017), 30(4), 135-136

Memorializes Dieter Ferring, who contributed to life-span developmental psychology, geropsychology, and cultural psychology in research, teaching, professional practice, and political consulting. His life ... [more ▼]

Memorializes Dieter Ferring, who contributed to life-span developmental psychology, geropsychology, and cultural psychology in research, teaching, professional practice, and political consulting. His life work centered on life circumstances that included threats to people's well-being and on identifying and implementing solutions for such aversive conditions. His scientific approach was characterized by analysing phenomena in their micro and macro context, by interdisciplinarity, by emphasis on cognitive and semiotic mediation, and by using mixed-method approaches to data collection and analyses. Dieter Ferring had been much engaged in productive cooperations with researchers from other countries in Europe and in disseminating his insights and findings to study programs beyond his own field as well as to the general public. He also served as an expert and research partner to policymakers and community administrators and leaders in practical and applied fields. [less ▲]

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See detailIndependence and Interdependence Values in Changing Societies: A Three-Generation Comparative Study in Estonia, Germany, and Russia
Tõugu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia; Kasearu, Kairi et al

in Studies of Transition States and Societies (2017), 9(2), 41-58

Independent and interdependent self-construal values of three generations and the intergenerational similarity of self-construal was compared in three countries. The participants were 837 adolescents ... [more ▼]

Independent and interdependent self-construal values of three generations and the intergenerational similarity of self-construal was compared in three countries. The participants were 837 adolescents, their mothers (227 from Russia, 311 from Germany, and 299 from Estonia) and 293 maternal grandmothers. In Germany, all three generations displayed higher scores on independence than participants from other countries. Russian participants had higher scores on interdependence compared to participants from other countries. Adolescents scored significantly higher on the interdependent self-construal than the two older generations, and higher than the mothers’ generation on the independent self-construal. Grandmothers’ self-construal was related to mothers’ in all three countries. In Germany and Estonia, mothers’ interdependent self-construal was related to adolescents’ interdependent self-construal. Grandmothers’ (but not mothers’) independent self-construal predicted adolescents’ independent self-construal. The results are discussed in light of the Family Change Theory and the different roles the participants have. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational Family Relations over the Life Course
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2016, May 23)

The present course will focus on intergenerational family relations over the life-span from the perspective of developmental psychology. In the first section, we will have a closer look at central ... [more ▼]

The present course will focus on intergenerational family relations over the life-span from the perspective of developmental psychology. In the first section, we will have a closer look at central definitions, models and concepts from life-span developmental psychology–for instance, life-span models of development, structuring the life course, developmental tasks, normative and non-normative life events, and the concept of generation. In the second part, we will focus on key concepts in the study of intergenerational family relations, such as intergenerational solidarity, conflict and ambivalence. Further, specific research evidence regarding intergenerational relations over the life span (including adolescent-parent, adult child-parent as well as grandchild-grandparent relations) will be presented and discussed, also taking into account cross-cultural aspects and intergenerational relations in the context of migration. [less ▲]

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See detailAdult Child-Parent Relations in the Context of Migration
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2016, April 07)

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries today, as a large number of first generation immigrants of the 1970s are currently approaching retirement age. In this context, also ... [more ▼]

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries today, as a large number of first generation immigrants of the 1970s are currently approaching retirement age. In this context, also questions regarding the intergenerational relations and intergenerational solidarity between first generation parents and their adult children - who have grown up in the host country - have gained high importance. Although the idea of return migration might often be well present in the lives of ageing migrants, an actual permanent return to the country of origin seems to be enacted more seldom, especially when the own children have settled down permanently in the receiving country. It is therefore of prime importance to learn more about the particular needs and resources of older migrants and their families. Ageing migrants face undoubtedly a special situation: The acculturation situation may result in an increased need for social support due to fewer sociocultural resources in the host country. Within migrant families, an acculturation gap between first and second generation might further lead to different expectations regarding intergenerational solidarity and support, and this can cause intergenerational strain and have negative effects on well-being of the different family members. The present training session will address issues of relationship quality (such as solidarity, conflict, ambivalence) as well as aspects of intergenerational value transmission between ageing first generation parents and their adult children in the context of migration. Both theoretical considerations as well as results from a recent study on Portuguese immigrant families in Luxembourg (IRMA – Intergenerational Relations in the Light of Migration and Ageing, funded by the Fonds National de la Recherche Luxembourg) will be presented and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational Family Relations in Luxembourg: Adult Children and their Ageing Parents in Migrant and Non-Migrant Families
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Roland-Lévy, Christine; Denoux, P.; Voyer, B. (Eds.) et al Unity, diversity and culture: Research and Scholarship Selected from the 22nd Congress of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology (2016)

Whereas most studies in the context of acculturation research have focused so far on family relations between first generation parents and their second generation children in adolescence, the present ... [more ▼]

Whereas most studies in the context of acculturation research have focused so far on family relations between first generation parents and their second generation children in adolescence, the present study draws its attention on immigrant families at later stages in the family life cycle. This study is part of the FNR-funded project on “Intergenerational Relations in the Light of Migration and Ageing – IRMA” in which a cross-cultural comparison of altogether N = 120 Portuguese and Luxembourgish triads of older parents and their adult children, both living in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, is envisaged. The aims of this project are, firstly to examine similarities and differences in family values, internalized norms and mutual expectations of older parents and their adult children in migrant and non-migrant families; secondly, to analyze in how far an acculturation gap respectively a generation gap might have an impact on the relationship quality between parents and their adult children; thirdly and related to this, to explore subjective well-being (SWB) of all involved family members. Results are discussed in the framework of an integrative model of intergenerational family relations in the light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecial Issue on Aging and Migration in Europe
Albert, Isabelle UL

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2016), 29(2),

Europe is experiencing demographic and social challenges unprecedented in its history. Migration flows, though not a new phenomenon, represent one of these challenges. Migration as the movement of social ... [more ▼]

Europe is experiencing demographic and social challenges unprecedented in its history. Migration flows, though not a new phenomenon, represent one of these challenges. Migration as the movement of social and national groups within as well as into Europe includes several motivations and objectives. Depending on these motivations, migrants are considered as welcome asset or as not-wanted claiming benefits of the national social security systems. What can we learn from earlier migration waves? Currently, a large number of first-generation immigrants of the big immigration waves of the 1960s and 1970s are approaching retirement age in many European countries. Contrary to earlier expectations, studies have shown that only a part of these aging migrants return to their countries of origin after retirement, whereas a larger part decides to stay permanently in the receiving country or to commute between both countries. Growing old in the context of migration has thus become a hot topic for many societies. Based on research from several European countries with large shares of immigrants, namely UK, Estonia, Denmark and Luxembourg, the special issue aging and migration focuses on some key questions regarding aging migrants. For instance, what do we know about cultural and ethnic identities of older migrants and how these are related to their transnational family relationships? How can social networks and intergenerational family solidarity of older migrants be described? What are specifics of care in the context of acculturation? The present contributions give some first answers to these questions, taking also into account how subjective well-being of aging migrants and their families might be enhanced. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction to the Special Issue on “Aging and Migration in Europe”
Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Lang, Frieder R.

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2016), 29(2), 53-55

Aging and migration have become key issues in many European societies today, as an unprecedented number of first-generation immigrants of the big immigration waves of the 1960s and 1970s are currently ... [more ▼]

Aging and migration have become key issues in many European societies today, as an unprecedented number of first-generation immigrants of the big immigration waves of the 1960s and 1970s are currently approaching retirement age. This special issue on aging and migration serves to raise the awareness on this important topic in modern societies. It brings together researchers in aging and migration from four different European countries characterized by a large share of immigrants in their population, namely, the UK, Estonia, Denmark, and Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailAltern in Luxembourg: Portugiesische Migrantinnen und Migranten in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Karl, Ute UL; Ramos, Anne Carolina UL

in Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur in Luxemburg (2016), 363

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (8 UL)