References of "Tsigkanos, Christos"
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See detailRoboMAX: Robotic Mission Adaptation eXemplars
Askarpour, Mehrnoosh; Tsigkanos, Christos; Menghi, Claudio UL et al

in Symposium on Software Engineering for Adaptive and Self-Managing Systems (SEAMS) - Artifact Track (2021)

Emerging and future applications of robotic systems pose unique self-adaptation challenges. To support the research needed to address these challenges, we provide an extensible repository of robotic ... [more ▼]

Emerging and future applications of robotic systems pose unique self-adaptation challenges. To support the research needed to address these challenges, we provide an extensible repository of robotic mission adaptation exemplars. Co-designed with robotic application stakeholders including researchers, developers, operators, and end-users, our repository captures key sources of uncertainty, adaptation concerns, and other distinguishing characteristics of such applications. An online form enables external parties to supply new exemplars for curation and inclusion into the repository. We envisage that our RoboMAX repository will enable the development, evaluation, and comparison of much-needed self-adaptation approaches for the robotic systems domain. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecification Patterns for Robotic Missions
Menghi, Claudio UL; Tsigkanos, Christos; Pelliccione, Pelliccione et al

in IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (2019)

Mobile and general-purpose robots increasingly support our everyday life, requiring dependable robotics control software. Creating such software mainly amounts to implementing their complex behaviors ... [more ▼]

Mobile and general-purpose robots increasingly support our everyday life, requiring dependable robotics control software. Creating such software mainly amounts to implementing their complex behaviors known as missions. Recognizing this need, a large number of domain-specific specification languages has been proposed. These, in addition to traditional logical languages, allow the use of formally specified missions for synthesis, verification, simulation or guiding implementation. For instance, the logical language LTL is commonly used by experts to specify missions as an input for planners, which synthesize the behavior a robot should have. Unfortunately, domain-specific languages are usually tied to specific robot models, while logical languages such as LTL are difficult to use by non-experts. We present a catalog of 22 mission specification patterns for mobile robots, together with tooling for instantiating, composing, and compiling the patterns to create mission specifications. The patterns provide solutions for recurrent specification problems, each of which detailing the usage intent, known uses, relationships to other patterns, and-most importantly-a template mission specification in temporal logic. Our tooling produces specifications expressed in the temporal logics LTL and CTL to be used by planners, simulators or model checkers. The patterns originate from 245 realistic textual mission requirements extracted from the robotics literature, and they are evaluated upon a total of 441 real-world mission requirements and 1251 mission specifications. Five of these reflect scenarios we defined with two well-known industrial partners developing human-size robots. We validated our patterns' correctness with simulators and two different types of real robots. [less ▲]

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See detailPsALM: specification of dependable robotic missions
Menghi, Claudio UL; Tsigkanos, Christos; Berger, Thorsten et al

in Proceedings of the 41st International Conference on Software Engineering: Companion Proceedings (2019)

Engineering dependable software for mobile robots is becoming increasingly important. A core asset to engineering mobile robots is the mission specification – a description of the mission that mobile ... [more ▼]

Engineering dependable software for mobile robots is becoming increasingly important. A core asset to engineering mobile robots is the mission specification – a description of the mission that mobile robots shall achieve. Mission specifications are used, among others, to synthesize, verify, simulate or guide the engineering of robot software. However, development of precise mission specifications is challenging, as engineers need to translate requirements into specification structures often ex- pressed in a logical language – a laborious and error-prone task. Specification patterns, as solutions for recurrent specification problems have been recognized as a solution for this problem. Each pattern details the usage intent, known uses, relationships to other patterns, and—most importantly—a template mission specification in temporal logic. Patterns constitute reusable build- ing blocks that can be used by engineers to create complex mission specifications while reducing mistakes. To this end, we describe PsALM, a toolchain supporting the development of dependable robotic missions. PsALM supports the description of mission requirements through specification patterns and allows automatic generation of mission specifications. PsALM produces specifications expressed in LTL and CTL temporal logics to be used by planners, simulators and model checkers, supporting systematic mission design. [less ▲]

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