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See detailDairy Intake and Parkinson's Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Study
Domenighetti, Cloé; Sugier, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ashok Kumar Sreelatha, Ashwin et al

in Movement Disorders (2022)

Abstract Background Previous prospective studies highlighted dairy intake as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly in men. It is unclear whether this association is causal or explained ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background Previous prospective studies highlighted dairy intake as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly in men. It is unclear whether this association is causal or explained by reverse causation or confounding. Objective The aim is to examine the association between genetically predicted dairy intake and PD using two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR). Methods We genotyped a well-established instrumental variable for dairy intake located in the lactase gene (rs4988235) within the Courage-PD consortium (23 studies; 9823 patients and 8376 controls of European ancestry). Results Based on a dominant model, there was an association between genetic predisposition toward higher dairy intake and PD (odds ratio [OR] per one serving per day = 1.70, 95 confidence interval = 1.12–2.60, P = 0.013) that was restricted to men (OR = 2.50 [1.37–4.56], P = 0.003; P-difference with women = 0.029). Conclusions Using MR, our findings provide further support for a causal relationship between dairy intake and higher PD risk, not biased by confounding or reverse causation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. © 2022 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society [less ▲]

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See detailMendelian randomization study of smoking, alcohol, and coffee drinking in relation to Parkinso's disease
Domenighetti, Cloe; Sugier, Pierre Emmanuel; Sreelatha, Ashwin Ashok Kumar et al

in Journal of Parkinson's Disease (2021)

Background:Previous studies showed that lifestyle behaviors (cigarette smoking, alcohol, coffee) are inversely associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The prodromal phase of PD raises the possibility ... [more ▼]

Background:Previous studies showed that lifestyle behaviors (cigarette smoking, alcohol, coffee) are inversely associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The prodromal phase of PD raises the possibility that these associations may be explained by reverse causation. Objective:To examine associations of lifestyle behaviors with PD using two-sample Mendelian randomisation (MR) and the potential for survival and incidence-prevalence biases. Methods:We used summary statistics from publicly available studies to estimate the association of genetic polymorphisms with lifestyle behaviors, and from Courage-PD (7,369 cases, 7,018 controls; European ancestry) to estimate the association of these variants with PD. We used the inverse-variance weighted method to compute odds ratios (ORIVW) of PD and 95%confidence intervals (CI). Significance was determined using a Bonferroni-corrected significance threshold (p = 0.017). Results:We found a significant inverse association between smoking initiation and PD (ORIVW per 1-SD increase in the prevalence of ever smoking = 0.74, 95%CI = 0.60–0.93, p = 0.009) without significant directional pleiotropy. Associations in participants ≤67 years old and cases with disease duration ≤7 years were of a similar size. No significant associations were observed for alcohol and coffee drinking. In reverse MR, genetic liability toward PD was not associated with smoking or coffee drinking but was positively associated with alcohol drinking. Conclusion:Our findings are in favor of an inverse association between smoking and PD that is not explained by reverse causation, confounding, and survival or incidence-prevalence biases. Genetic liability toward PD was positively associated with alcohol drinking. Conclusions on the association of alcohol and coffee drinking with PD are hampered by insufficient statistical power. [less ▲]

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See detailThe GBAP1 pseudogene acts as a ceRNA for the glucocerebrosidase gene GBA by sponging miR-22-3p.
Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Samarani, Maura et al

in Scientific reports (2017), 7(1), 12702

Mutations in the GBA gene, encoding lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, represent the major predisposing factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), and modulation of the glucocerebrosidase activity is an emerging PD ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the GBA gene, encoding lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, represent the major predisposing factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), and modulation of the glucocerebrosidase activity is an emerging PD therapy. However, little is known about mechanisms regulating GBA expression. We explored the existence of a regulatory network involving GBA, its expressed pseudogene GBAP1, and microRNAs. The high level of sequence identity between GBA and GBAP1 makes the pseudogene a promising competing-endogenous RNA (ceRNA), functioning as a microRNA sponge. After selecting microRNAs potentially targeting both transcripts, we demonstrated that miR-22-3p binds to and down-regulates GBA and GBAP1, and decreases their endogenous mRNA levels up to 70%. Moreover, over-expression of GBAP1 3'-untranslated region was able to sequester miR-22-3p, thus increasing GBA mRNA and glucocerebrosidase levels. The characterization of GBAP1 splicing identified multiple out-of-frame isoforms down-regulated by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, suggesting that GBAP1 levels and, accordingly, its ceRNA effect, are significantly modulated by this degradation process. Using skin-derived induced pluripotent stem cells of PD patients with GBA mutations and controls, we observed a significant GBA up-regulation during dopaminergic differentiation, paralleled by down-regulation of miR-22-3p. Our results describe the first microRNA controlling GBA and suggest that the GBAP1 non-coding RNA functions as a GBA ceRNA. [less ▲]

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