References of "Seidel, Kay"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of the cerebellum in Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.
Seidel, Kay; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Heidemann, Nina et al

in Annals of neurology (2017), 81(6), 898-903

Brains from patients with Parkinson disease or dementia with Lewy bodies show aggregation of alpha-synuclein in precerebellar brainstem structures. Furthermore, patients exhibit resting tremor, unstable ... [more ▼]

Brains from patients with Parkinson disease or dementia with Lewy bodies show aggregation of alpha-synuclein in precerebellar brainstem structures. Furthermore, patients exhibit resting tremor, unstable gait, and impaired balance, which may be associated with cerebellar dysfunction. Therefore, we screened the cerebella of 12 patients with alpha-synucleinopathies for neuropathological changes. Cerebellar nuclei and neighboring white matter displayed numerous aggregates, whereas lobules were mildly affected. Cerebellar aggregation pathology may suggest a prionlike spread originating from affected precerebellar structures, and the high homogeneity between patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease shows that both diseases likely belong to the same neuropathological spectrum. Ann Neurol 2017;81:898-903. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFirst appraisal of brain pathology owing to A30P mutant alpha-synuclein.
Seidel, Kay; Schols, Ludger; Nuber, Silke et al

in Annals of neurology (2010), 67(5), 684-9

Familial Parkinson disease (PD) due to the A30P mutation in the SNCA gene encoding alpha-synuclein is clinically associated with PD symptoms. In this first pathoanatomical study of the brain of an A30P ... [more ▼]

Familial Parkinson disease (PD) due to the A30P mutation in the SNCA gene encoding alpha-synuclein is clinically associated with PD symptoms. In this first pathoanatomical study of the brain of an A30P mutation carrier, we observed neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, locus coeruleus, and dorsal motor vagal nucleus, as well as widespread occurrence of alpha-synuclein immunopositive Lewy bodies, Lewy neurites, and glial aggregates. Alpha-synuclein aggregates ultrastructurally resembled Lewy bodies, and biochemical analyses disclosed a significant load of insoluble alpha-synuclein, indicating neuropathological similarities between A30P disease patients and idiopathic PD, with a more severe neuropathology in A30P carriers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 139 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailReview: Familial Parkinson's disease--genetics, clinical phenotype and neuropathology in relation to the common sporadic form of the disease.
Schiesling, Carola; Kieper, Nicole; Seidel, Kay et al

in Neuropathology and applied neurobiology (2008), 34(3), 255-71

The identification of the first gene in familial Parkinson's disease (PD) only 10 years ago was a major step in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms in neurodegeneration. Alpha-synuclein ... [more ▼]

The identification of the first gene in familial Parkinson's disease (PD) only 10 years ago was a major step in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms in neurodegeneration. Alpha-synuclein aggregation was not only recognized as a key event in neurodegeneration in patients carrying mutations in this gene, but it turned out to be the most consistent marker to define Lewy body pathology also in non-heritable idiopathic PD (IPD). Subsequent comprehensive pathoanatomical studies of IPD brains led to a novel concept of an ascending pathological process in variable stages that are reflected by alpha-synuclein aggregation at specific predilection sites. To date, more than seven genes are known to cause familial PD. The fact that these genetic forms of Parkinsonism present with clinical features indistinguishable from IPD, but may display neuropathological features that are not consistent with IPD, underscores the need of a more differentiated approach to familial and sporadic forms of Parkinsonism. Indeed, in distinct populations, mutations in one single gene were found to cause the disease in up to 40% of patients formerly described as 'idiopathic' cases. These findings indicate that IPD, as defined by a late-onset disorder with no (apparent) genetic contribution, is part of a clinical syndrome that becomes more and more heterogeneous in terms of aetiology, with overlapping clinical and pathoanatomical features. Thus in the present review, we discuss clues from familial PD to our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of neurodegeneration with special consideration of the variable clinical and neuropathological aspects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (0 UL)