References of "Restout, Romain"
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See detailLabor Market Effects Of Technology Shocks Biased Toward The Traded Sector
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Cardi, Olivier; Restout, Romain

in Journal of International Economics (2022)

Our VAR evidence for OECD countries reveals that the non-traded sector alone drives the increase in hours worked following a technology shock that increases permanently traded relative to non-traded TFP ... [more ▼]

Our VAR evidence for OECD countries reveals that the non-traded sector alone drives the increase in hours worked following a technology shock that increases permanently traded relative to non-traded TFP. The shock generates a reallocation of labor toward the non-traded sector which contributes to 35% of the rise in non-traded hours worked. Both labor reallocation and variations in labor income shares are found empirically connected with factor-biased technological change. Our quantitative analysis shows that a two-sector open economy model with flexible prices can reproduce the labor market effects we document empirically once we allow for imperfect mobility of labor, a demand for home-produced traded goods which is elastic enough w.r.t. the terms of trade, and factor-biased technological change. When calibrating the model to country-specific data, its ability to account for the cross-country reallocation and redistributive effects we estimate increases once we let factor-biased technological change vary between sectors and countries. [less ▲]

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See detailRelative Productivity and Search Unemployment in an Open Economy
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Cardi, Olivier; Restout, Romain

in Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control (2020), 117

Using a panel of eighteen OECD countries, we find empirically that the long-run effects of higher productivity of tradables relative to non-tradables vary across time, space and stages of the business ... [more ▼]

Using a panel of eighteen OECD countries, we find empirically that the long-run effects of higher productivity of tradables relative to non-tradables vary across time, space and stages of the business cycle. More specifically, our evidence reveals that elasticities of the relative wage and relative price of non-tradables with respect to relative productivity of tradables increase over time. Our estimates also show that the fall in the relative wage is more pronounced whilst the appreciation in the relative price is less in countries where labor markets are more regulated and during periods of recession. To rationalize the evidence, we differentiate between labor mobility costs caused by job search efforts and hiring costs resulting from search frictions in the labor market in a two-sector open economy model. While time-declining labor mobility costs can account for the time-increasing effects of a productivity differential, international differences in labor market regulation and variations of hiring costs across the business cycle, respectively, can rationalize the cross-country and state-dependent effects we estimate empirically. Finally, labor market frictions have important implications for sectoral unemployment since labor mobility and hiring costs bias labor demand toward the traded sector which results in a greater decline in unemployment in tradables relative to unemployment in non-tradables following higher relative productivity. [less ▲]

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