References of "Rejeb, Abderahman"
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See detailThe Future Food Chain: Digitization as an Enabler of Society 5.0
Keogh, John G.; Dube, Laurette; Rejeb, Abderahman et al

in Building the Future of Food Safety Technology, 1st Edition, Blockchain and Beyond (2020)

Food systems and food supply chains (FSCs) have undergone significant changes in their operations and structure over the last decade as globalization expands both food choice and availability. As FSCs ... [more ▼]

Food systems and food supply chains (FSCs) have undergone significant changes in their operations and structure over the last decade as globalization expands both food choice and availability. As FSCs lengthen, and food passes through extended trading relationships, transparency on food origins, methods of cultivation, harvest, processing as well as labor conditions and sustainability is reduced, along with food trust. Moreover, while the rapid pace of technology innovation benefits FSCs, we are witness to the usage of social media platforms by citizen-consumers to amplify the rhetoric related to recurring incidents and crises in food quality, food safety, food fraud, food security, sustainability, and other ethical lapses. Furthermore, we are witness to new evidence on the global burden of foodborne diseases, including non-communicable diseases that range from severe malnutrition to morbid obesity and from severe illnesses requiring hospitalization to mortality. The World Health Organization claims that thirty-one foodborne hazards cause six-hundred million illnesses and four-hundred and twenty thousand deaths annually. Overcoming these challenges requires a holistic reframing of our food systems and societal challenges. The emergence of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provides an overarching framework for collaboration and alignment. Japan has put forward a vision for a human-centric, technology-enabled future branded as "Society 5.0". Increasingly, the redesign of FSCs necessitates a concerted, multi-stakeholder effort and the development of digitization strategies in order to cope with the evolution toward the vision of Society 5.0 and to achieve the UN SDGs. [less ▲]

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See detailBlockchain and GS1 Standards in the Food Chain: A Review of the Possibilities and Challenges
Keogh, John G.; Rejeb, Abderahman; Khan, Nida UL et al

in Building the Future of Food Safety Technology, 1st Edition, Blockchain and Beyond (2020)

The globalization of food systems has engendered significant changes to the operation and structure of food supply chains (FSCs). Alongside increasing consumer demands for safe and sustainable food ... [more ▼]

The globalization of food systems has engendered significant changes to the operation and structure of food supply chains (FSCs). Alongside increasing consumer demands for safe and sustainable food products, FSCs are challenged with issues related to information transparency and consumer trust. Uncertainty in matters of transparency and trust arises from the growing information asymmetry between food producers and food consumers. In particular: how and where food is cultivated, harvested, processed, and under what conditions. FSCs are tasked with guaranteeing the highest standards in food quality and food safety-ensuring the use of safe and authentic ingredients, limiting product perishability, and mitigating the risk of opportunism such as quality cheating or falsification of information. A sustainable, food-secure world will require multidirectional sharing of information and enhanced information symmetry between food producers and food consumers. The need for information symmetry will drive transformational changes in FSCs methods of practice and will require a coherent standardized framework of best practice recommendations to manage logistic units in the food chain A standardized framework will enhance food traceability, drive FSC efficiencies, enable data interoperability, improve data governance practices, and set supply chain identification standards for products and assets (what), exchange parties (who), locations (where), business processes (why) and sequence (when). FSCs began to adopt industry-driven supply chain standards in 1974 when the first barcode was scanned at a point-of-sale at Marsh's Supermarket in Troy, Ohio. However, the adoption of standards alone will not adequately address the challenges created by the information asymmetry between food producers and food consumers. Therefore, this paper examines the integration of GS1 standards with the functional components of Blockchain technology as an approach to realize a coherent standardized framework of industry-based tools for successful FSC transformation. [less ▲]

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