References of "Oberacher, Herbert"
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See detailELIXIR and Toxicology: a community in development
Martens, Marvin; Stierum, Rob; Schymanski, Emma UL et al

in F1000Research (2021), 10

Toxicology has been an active research field for many decades, with academic, industrial and government involvement. Modern omics and computational approaches are changing the field, from merely disease ... [more ▼]

Toxicology has been an active research field for many decades, with academic, industrial and government involvement. Modern omics and computational approaches are changing the field, from merely disease-specific observational models into target-specific predictive models. Traditionally, toxicology has strong links with other fields such as biology, chemistry, pharmacology and medicine. With the rise of synthetic and new engineered materials, alongside ongoing prioritisation needs in chemical risk assessment for existing chemicals, early predictive evaluations are becoming of utmost importance to both scientific and regulatory purposes. ELIXIR is an intergovernmental organisation that brings together life science resources from across Europe. To coordinate the linkage of various life science efforts around modern predictive toxicology, the establishment of a new ELIXIR Community is seen as instrumental. In the past few years, joint efforts, building on incidental overlap, have been piloted in the context of ELIXIR. For example, the EU-ToxRisk, diXa, HeCaToS, transQST, and the nanotoxicology community have worked with the ELIXIR TeSS, Bioschemas, and Compute Platforms and activities. In 2018, a core group of interested parties wrote a proposal, outlining a sketch of what this new ELIXIR Toxicology Community would look like. A recent workshop (held September 30th to October 1st, 2020) extended this into an ELIXIR Toxicology roadmap and a shortlist of limited investment-high gain collaborations to give body to this new community. This Whitepaper outlines the results of these efforts and defines our vision of the ELIXIR Toxicology Community and how it complements other ELIXIR activities. [less ▲]

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See detailA European proposal for quality control and quality assurance of tandem mass spectral libraries
Oberacher, Herbert; Sasse, Michael; Antignac, Jean-Philippe et al

in Environmental Sciences Europe (2020), 32(1), 1--19

Background: High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is being used increasingly in the context of suspect and non-targeted screening for the identification of bioorganic molecules. There is ... [more ▼]

Background: High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is being used increasingly in the context of suspect and non-targeted screening for the identification of bioorganic molecules. There is correspondingly increasing awareness that higher confidence identification will require a systematic, group effort to increase the fraction of compounds with tandem mass spectra available in central, publicly available resources. While typical suspect screening efforts will only result in tentative annotations with a moderate level of confidence, library spectral matches will yield higher confidence or even full confirmation of the identity if the reference standards are available. Results: This article first explores representative percent coverage of measured tandem mass spectra in selected major environmental suspect databases of interest in the context of human biomonitoring, demonstrating the current extensive gap between the number of potential substances of interest (up to hundreds of thousands) and measured spectra (0.57–3.6% of the total chemicals have spectral information available). Furthermore, certain datasets are benchmarked, based on previous efforts, to show the extent to which acquired experimental data were comparable between laboratories, even with HRMS instruments based on different technologies (i.e., quadrupole–quadrupole-time of flight versus ion trap/quadrupole-Orbitrap). Instruments and settings that are less comparable are also revealed, primarily linear ion trap instruments, which show distinctly lower comparability. Conclusions: Based on these efforts, harmonization guidelines for the acquisition and processing of tandem mass spectrometry data are proposed to enable European (and ideally worldwide) laboratories to contribute to common resources, without requiring extensive changes to their current in house methods. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnotating Nontargeted LC-HRMS/MS Data with Two Complementary Tandem Mass Spectral Libraries
Oberacher, Herbert; Reinstadler, Vera; Kreidl, Marco et al

in Metabolites (2018), 9(1 3),

Tandem mass spectral databases are indispensable for fast and reliable compound identification in nontargeted analysis with liquid chromatography–high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS/MS ... [more ▼]

Tandem mass spectral databases are indispensable for fast and reliable compound identification in nontargeted analysis with liquid chromatography–high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS/MS), which is applied to a wide range of scientific fields. While many articles now review and compare spectral libraries, in this manuscript we investigate two high-quality and specialized collections from our respective institutes, recorded on different instruments (quadrupole time-of-flight or QqTOF vs. Orbitrap). The optimal range of collision energies for spectral comparison was evaluated using 233 overlapping compounds between the two libraries, revealing that spectra in the range of CE 20–50 eV on the QqTOF and 30–60 nominal collision energy units on the Orbitrap provided optimal matching results for these libraries. Applications to complex samples from the respective institutes revealed that the libraries, combined with a simple data mining approach to retrieve all spectra with precursor and fragment information, could confirm many validated target identifications and yield several new Level 2a (spectral match) identifications. While the results presented are not surprising in many ways, this article adds new results to the debate on the comparability of Orbitrap and QqTOF data and the application of spectral libraries to yield rapid and high-confidence tentative identifications in complex human and environmental samples. [less ▲]

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