References of "Frick, Joachim"
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See detailIndividual Well-Being in a Dynamic Perspective
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Frick, Joachim

in Economica (2012), 79

We explore the determinants of individual wellbeing as measured by self-reported levels of satisfaction with income and life. Making use of the German Socio-Economic Panel, we provide empirical evidence ... [more ▼]

We explore the determinants of individual wellbeing as measured by self-reported levels of satisfaction with income and life. Making use of the German Socio-Economic Panel, we provide empirical evidence for wellbeing depending on absolute and relative income levels in a dynamic framework where status and signal effects play a role. This finding holds after controlling for other factors in a multivariate setting. The main novelty is the consideration of dynamic aspects: the individual’s own history and the relative income performance with respect to other society members play major roles in the assessment of individual wellbeing. [less ▲]

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See detailSatisfaction with Life and Economic Well-Being: Evidence from Germany
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Frick, Joachim; Jäntti, Markus

in Schmollers Jahrbuch (2009), 129

The relationship between an individual's economic well-being and satisfaction with own life has been the focus of many studies both within and across countries, in one period of time and over time. As a ... [more ▼]

The relationship between an individual's economic well-being and satisfaction with own life has been the focus of many studies both within and across countries, in one period of time and over time. As a proxy of economic well-being household income both adjusted and unadjusted for household needs has been generally used. The aim of the present paper is to propose a more comprehensive measure of well-being considering the role that wealth and permanent income play in simultaneously determining satisfaction with life. The results, based on representative microdata from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP), suggest that both income and wealth increase satisfaction, that long-run income is more appropriate than short-term income and that satisfaction with life is particularly high for those who are at the top of both the income and wealth distributions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 175 (7 UL)