References of "Domahs, F."
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See detailLearning complex arithmetic--an fMRI study.
Delazer, M.; Domahs, F.; Bartha, L. et al

in Cognitive Brain Research (2003), 18(1), 76-88

Aim of the present functional magnet resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to detect modifications of cerebral activation patterns related to learning arithmetic. Thirteen right-handed subjects were ... [more ▼]

Aim of the present functional magnet resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to detect modifications of cerebral activation patterns related to learning arithmetic. Thirteen right-handed subjects were extensively trained on a set of 18 complex multiplication problems. In the following fMRI session, trained and untrained problems (closely matched for difficulty) were presented in blocked order alternating with a number matching task and a fact retrieval task. Importantly, left hemispheric activations were dominant in the two contrasts between untrained and trained condition, suggesting that learning processes in arithmetic are predominantly supported by the left hemisphere. Contrasting untrained versus trained condition, the left intraparietal sulcus showed significant activations, as well as the inferior parietal lobule. A further significant activation was found in the left inferior frontal gyrus. This activation may be accounted for by higher working memory demands in the untrained as compared to the trained condition. Contrasting trained versus untrained condition a significant focus of activation was found in the left angular gyrus. Following the triple-code model [Science 284 (1999) 970], the shift of activation within the parietal lobe from the intraparietal sulcus to the left angular gyrus suggests a modification from quantity-based processing to more automatic retrieval. The present study shows that the left angular gyrus is not only involved in arithmetic tasks requiring simple fact retrieval, but may show significant activations as a result of relatively short training of complex calculation. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen writing 0 (zero) is easier than writing O (o): a neuropsychological case study of agraphia.
Delazer, M.; Lochy, Aliette UL; Jenner, C. et al

in Neuropsychologia (2002), 40(12), 2167-77

Though a few case studies reported a dissociation between intact writing of Arabic and impaired writing of alphabetical script, a detailed experimental analysis of such a dissociation is still lacking. We ... [more ▼]

Though a few case studies reported a dissociation between intact writing of Arabic and impaired writing of alphabetical script, a detailed experimental analysis of such a dissociation is still lacking. We report a follow-up study of a patient with a parieto-occipital lesion who is affected by severe peripheral agraphia for letters, but not for Arabic digits. While letters in writing to dictation are frequently illegible, distorted, or consist in meaningless strokes, Arabic digits are well-formed and fluently produced. In a series of tasks, including copying of letters with tachistoscopic presentation and handwriting on a digitizing tablet, several processing levels are assessed in order to localize JS' functional writing impairment and to determine different processing routes for letters and for numbers. Overall, the results of the experimental investigation suggest a notation specific deficit in the activation of graphomotor patterns for letters, but not for digits. The study thus adds evidence to the so far reported dissociations between Arabic and alphabetical scripts. [less ▲]

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