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See detailContact between shear-deformable beams with elliptical cross-sections
Magliulo, Marco UL; Zilian, Andreas UL; Beex, Lars UL

in Acta Mechanica (in press)

Slender constituents are present in many structures and materials. In associated mechanical models, each slender constituent is often described with a beam. Contact between beams is essential to ... [more ▼]

Slender constituents are present in many structures and materials. In associated mechanical models, each slender constituent is often described with a beam. Contact between beams is essential to incorporate in mechanical models, but associated contact frameworks are only demonstrated to work for beams with circular cross-sections. Only two studies have shown the ability to treat contact between beams with elliptical cross-sections, but those frameworks are limited to point-wise contact, which narrows their applicability. This contribution presents initial results of a framework for shear-deformable beams with elliptical cross-sections if contact occurs along a line or at an area (instead of at a point). This is achieved by integrating a penalty potential over one of the beams’ surfaces. Simo-Reissner Geometrically Exact Beam (GEB) elements are employed to discretise each beam. As the surface of an assembly of such beam elements is discontinuous, a smoothed surface is introduced to formulate the contact kinematics. This enables the treatment of contact for large sliding displacements and substantial deformations. [less ▲]

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See detailA comparison between conventional Earth Observation Satellites and CubeSats; Requirements, Capabilities and Data Quality
Backes, Dietmar UL; Hassani, Saif Alislam UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September 11)

From its early beginning as an educational tool in 1999, cubesats have evolved into a popular platform for technology demonstrations and scientific instruments. Ideas and innovations sparked from an ... [more ▼]

From its early beginning as an educational tool in 1999, cubesats have evolved into a popular platform for technology demonstrations and scientific instruments. Ideas and innovations sparked from an enthusiastic community led to the development of new Earth Observation (EO) technology concepts based on large constellations of satellites with high-resolution optical imagers previously considered as infeasible. Probably the most significant constellation today is deployed by Planet who are currently operating a fleet larger than 120 3U Dove satellites, which provide an imaging service with up to 3m Ground Sample Distance (GSD). The number of low-cost EO Cubesat systems is constantly increasing. However, for a number of reasons there still seems to be a reluctance to use such data for many EO applications. A better understanding of the capabilities of the current generation of small Cubesats compared to the traditional well-established bigger operational missions of high and medium resolution EO satellites is required. What are the critical capabilities and quality indicators? Due to the limited size and weight of Cubesats, critical system components, e.g. for navigation and communication, always compete with operational payloads such as optical camera/sensor systems. A functional EO system requires balanced payload, which provides adequate navigational capabilities, that match the requirements of the optical imagers (camera) deployed with the system. This study reviews the current performance and capabilities of Cubesats for optical EO and compares them to the capabilities of conventional, dedicated high and medium resolution EO systems. We summarise key performance parameters and quality indicators to evaluate the difference between the systems. An empirical study compares recent very high-resolution (VHR) imagery from big EO satellite missions with available images from Cubesats for the use case in disaster monitoring. Small and agile Nanosatellites or Cubesats already show remarkable performance. Although it is not expected that their performance and capability will match those of current bigger EO satellite missions, they are expected to provide a valuable tool for EO and remote sensing, in particular for downstream industry applications. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrity and Confidentiality Problems of Outsourcing
Pejo, Balazs UL

Doctoral thesis (2019)

Cloud services enable companies to outsource data storage and computation. Resource-limited entities could use this pay-per-use model to outsource large-scale computational tasks to a cloud-service ... [more ▼]

Cloud services enable companies to outsource data storage and computation. Resource-limited entities could use this pay-per-use model to outsource large-scale computational tasks to a cloud-service-provider. Nonetheless, this on-demand network access raises the issues of security and privacy, which has become a primary concern of recent decades. In this dissertation, we tackle these problems from two perspectives: data confidentiality and result integrity. Concerning data confidentiality, we systematically classify the relaxations of the most widely used privacy preserving technique called Differential Privacy. We also establish a partial ordering of strength between these relaxations and enlist whether they satisfy additional desirable properties, such as composition and privacy axioms. Tackling the problem of confidentiality, we design a Collaborative Learning game, which helps the data holders to determine how to set the privacy parameter based on economic aspects. We also define the Price of Privacy to measure the overall degradation of accuracy resulting from the applied privacy protection. Moreover, we develop a procedure called Self-Division, which bridges the gap between the game and real-world scenarios. Concerning result integrity, we formulate a Stackelberg game between outsourcer and outsourcee where no absolute correctness is required. We provide the optimal strategies for the players and perform a sensitivity analysis. Furthermore, we extend the game by allowing the outsourcer no to verify and show its Nash Equilibriums. Regarding integrity verification, we analyze and compare two verification methods for Collaborative Filtering algorithms: the splitting and the auxiliary data approach. We observe that neither methods provides a full solution for the raised problem. Hence, we propose a solution, which besides outperforming these is also applicable to both stage of the algorithms. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung children's agency in learning novel languages in multilingual environments
Mortini, Simone UL

Presentation (2019, September 05)

The concept of child agency is highly discussed in the fields of humanities, sociology and education. Whereas children were previously conceptualised as incomplete adults or social becomings in the adult ... [more ▼]

The concept of child agency is highly discussed in the fields of humanities, sociology and education. Whereas children were previously conceptualised as incomplete adults or social becomings in the adult world, children’s agency has undergone a paradigm shift in recent decades. Pioneer early childhood scholars such as Prout and James (1990) and Corsaro (2005) have argued that children are reflexive, agentive and social beings, who construct and re-construct childhood and actively shape socialization processes. Similarly, scholars in the emerging field of preschool bilingual education have stressed children’s active role in language learning processes and in shaping language policies and practices through their own languaging and interactions (Bergroth & Palviainen, 2017; Boyd & Huss, 2017; Schwartz, 2018). These scholars define children’s bilingual agency as the ‘socioculturally mediated capacity to act, as it is reflected in the children’s communicative acts’ (Ahearn, 2001; Bergroth & Palviainen, 2017). From the same sociocultural perspective on learning, educationalist researchers show that preschool children’s agency is embedded in institutional and interactional orders (Huf 2013, Hilpöö et al., 2016). Young children can express a bilingual agency by linguistically supporting each other (Mourão, 2018); discussing and evaluating their own and others’ language practices (Almér, 2017); demonstrating a metalinguistic awareness (Schwartz, 2018); and even by modifying language policy-in-practice (Boyd & Huss, 2017). Moreover, studies suggest that opportunities to use languages flexibly in the classroom may give children some agency over their language use and facilitate their language learning (García & Kleifgen, 2018). Nevertheless, findings on young children’s translanguaging and agency are still scarce, particularly in multilingual contexts involving more than two languages (Kirsch, 2017; Schwartz, 2018). In light of these current trends and gaps in the fields of language learning and education, the present doctoral study gives insights into young children’s agency in learning novel languages in Luxembourg. In this trilingual country, a new law on multilingual education was passed in 2017. This transition from a monolingual to a multilingual language policy was motivated by recent results of national studies which showed that non-Luxembourgish children scored below average in primary school (MENJE, 2017). As the new multilingual language policy strives for social justice and equal opportunities, early childhood practitioners are now required to teach Luxembourgish to the children, familiarize them with French and value their home languages. This doctoral thesis is part of the research project MuLiPEC (Kirsch, 2016-2019) which provided seven practitioners in two formal and two non-formal early childhood education settings with an extensive professional training and individual coaching in multilingual pedagogies. Whereas the main research team examined the practitioners’ changing multilingual practices, knowledge and beliefs, I focused on the children in these settings. I investigated eight two- to four-year-old children’s languaging and agentive behaviour over the period of a year. The present paper focuses on four focal children in two formal education settings. In the précoce, a non-compulsory preschool year for three-year-olds, one Portuguese- and one Cape Verdean Creole-speaking girls learned Luxembourgish as a second language. In the compulsory preschool for children aged four to five, two Spanish-speaking boys had previously learned features of other languages (French, Mallorquí, English) and encountered Luxembourgish as a novel language. Following research questions are addressed: - In what ways and to what extent do the four children deploy their linguistic and non-linguistic repertoires in interaction with peers and teachers? - In what ways and to what extent do the children express a multilingual agency in language learning? - In what ways is the children’s multilingual agency socioculturally embedded? The findings should contribute to the understanding of children’s agency in learning novel languages in early childhood education settings implementing multilingual pedagogies. This longitudinal study drew on multidimensional qualitative methods, including observations, fieldnotes, videography, informal discussions and semi-structural interviews with the practitioners. I visited the two schools bi-weekly for three consecutive days during one academic year. The data presented in this paper stems from 34 days of observations during daily interactions and planned language learning activities; 277 video-recordings in lengths ranging from one to forty minutes; and eight semi-structured interviews. Adopting an emic perspective, the data were firstly examined with a thematic analysis following Braun and Clarke (2006). I coded the fieldnotes and the transcriptions of the video-recordings and classified these codes into different forms of languaging and interactions. As the study adopted a sociocultural perspective on language learning, selected interactions were additionally analysed line-by-line using a ‘sociocultural theory approach to conversation analysis’ inspired by Seedhouse (2005). The analysis proceeded inductively and deductively being influenced by the literature review. Consequently, I identified the children’s agentive behaviour during interactions with their peers and practitioners. The coding and classification were extensively discussed with Schwartz and Kirsch in the process of collaboratively writing an article on child agency. As a result, the emergent themes were called: active participation (e.g. engaging through translanguaging in the morning circle; creatively reproducing the adults’ communication strategies); and language management (e.g. taking a leading role in shaping activities in a specific language; refusing to speak a language). Finally, the observational data and interviews were triangulated (Flick, 2011). To assure accuracy and trustworthiness, the findings were discussed and compared in meetings with further international researchers in the fields of multilingualism and early childhood education. The research project complies with the ethics principles of the National Data Protection Regulatory Agency and the University of Luxembourg. Moreover, the study followed the recognised ethical principles of the British Educational Research Association. The participants gave their informed consent and their anonymity is strictly respected in presentations and publications. The data showed that the children were not passively socialised into the Luxembourgish language, but actively shaped this process by challenging norms through different types of agentive behaviour during interactions and activities (Schwartz 2018). Firstly, the children actively participated through non-verbal communication (e.g. pointing, doing actions); the use of other languages (e.g. home languages or languages picked up in a crèche); and the repetition of formulaic speech (e.g. Luxembourgish, French) after practitioners and peers. Moreover, they creatively reproduced (Corsaro, 2005) the practitioners’ language use (e.g. labelling and asking questions) during peer interactions. Furthermore, they all showed a pragmatic sensitivity (e.g. adapting their languaging to their interlocutors, asking for translations) and one child a cross-linguistic sensitivity (e.g. comparing words in different languages). Secondly, the children’s involvement went beyond active participation as they not only monitored their own language use (e.g. translanguaged to mediate meaning), but managed to shape the language use of their peers and practitioners. This agentive behaviour was characterised by engaging in peer teaching (e.g. giving corrective feedback); shaping and changing activities (e.g. transforming a monolingual activity into a multilingual one); refusing to speak a language (e.g. the home language in favour of the dominant language). By transforming or resisting language practices, the children made choices to act against expectations and norms (Fogle 2012). This finding presumes that these very young children were to some extent conscious about prevailing norms in the settings (Bergroth & Palviainen, 2017). Finally, the triangulation of the data showed that the children’s multilingual agency was shaped by the teachers’ own agency and language practices, which in turn were shaped by their conceptualisations of the children (e.g. competent versus incompetent), the official language policies (e.g. monolingual versus multilingual) and the professional development and coaching they were given by the research team (Kirsch & Aleksić, 2018). References: Ahearn, L. (2001). Language and agency, Annual Review of Anthropology, 30: 109-137. Almér, E. (2017). Children’s beliefs about bilingualism and language use as expressed in child-adult conversations, Multilingua, 36(4): 401-424. Bergroth, M., & Palviainen, Å. (2017). Bilingual children as policy agents: Language policy and education policy in minority language medium Early Childhood Education and Care, Multilingua, 36(4): 375-399. Boyd, S., & Huss, L. (2017). Young children as language policy-makers: studies of interaction in preschools in Finland and Sweden, Multilingua, 36(4), 359-373. Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology, Qualitative Research in psychology, 3(2): 77-101. Corsaro, W. (2005). Collective Action and Agency in Young Children’s Peer Cultures. In J. Qvortrup (ed.), Studies in Modern Childhood: Society, Agency, Culture (pp. 231-247). Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillen. Flick, U. (2011). Triangulation - Eine Einführung (3. aktualisierte Auflage). (Reihe Qualitative Sozialforschung). Wiesbaden: Verlag für Sozialwissenschaft. Fogle, L. W. (2012). Second language socialization and learner agency: Talk in three adoptive families. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. García, O., & Kleifgen, J.A. (2018). Educating Emergent Bilinguals: Policies, Programs, and Practices for English Learners (Second edition). New York: Teachers College Press. Hilppö, J., Lipponen, L, Kumpulainen, K., and Rainio A. (2016). Children’s sense of agency in preschool: a sociocultural investigation, International Journal of Early Years Education, 25(2): 157-171. Huf, C. (2013). Children’s agency during transition to formal schooling, Ethnography and Education, 8(1): 61-76. Kirsch, C. (2017). Translanguaging practices during storytelling with the app iTEO in preschools, Translation and Translanguaging in Multilingual Contexts, 3(2): 145-166. Kirsch, C., & Aleksić, G. (2018). The Effect of Professional Development on Multilingual Education in Early Childhood in Luxembourg, Review of European Studies, 10(4): 148-163. Mourão, S. (2018). Play and Peer Interaction in a Low-Exposure Foreign Language Learning Programme. In M. Schwartz (ed.). Preschool Bilingual Education: Agency in Interactions between Children, Teachers, and Parents (pp. 313-342). Dordrecht: Springer. Prout, A., and James, A. (1990). A new paradigm for the sociology of childhood? Provenance, promise and problems. In A. James and A. Prout (eds.). Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood. Contemporary Issues in Sociological Study of Childhood (pp. 7-34). London: Routledge Falmer. Schwartz, M. (2018). Preschool Bilingual Education: Agency in Interactions between Children, Teachers, and Parents. In: M. Schwartz (ed.), Preschool Bilingual Education: Agency in Interactions between Children, Teachers, and Parents (pp. 1-26). Dordrecht: Springer. Seedhouse, P. (2005). Conversation Analysis and language learning, Language Teaching 38(4):165-187. [less ▲]

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See detailLe rôle des acteurs locaux dans l’accueil des demandeurs d’asile et des réfugiés au Luxembourg
Oesch, Lucas UL; Lemaire, Léa UL; Vianelli, Lorenzo

Article for general public (2019)

La recherche sur l’accueil des réfugiés, en Europe et de par le monde, porte une attention croissante au rôle des acteurs dits locaux. Jusqu’à peu, l’accueil était considéré comme une question quasi ... [more ▼]

La recherche sur l’accueil des réfugiés, en Europe et de par le monde, porte une attention croissante au rôle des acteurs dits locaux. Jusqu’à peu, l’accueil était considéré comme une question quasi exclusivement nationale. Il est vrai que les Etats centraux gardent toute leur importance, notamment en ce qui concerne les processus de décision. Cependant, l’accueil se joue aussi à une échelle locale, en particulier pour la mise en oeuvre des politiques. Quel est donc le rôle des acteurs locaux dans l’accueil des demandeurs et bénéficiaires de protection internationale au Luxembourg ? [less ▲]

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See detailVisualization of AE's Training on Credit Card Transactions with Persistent Homology
Charlier, Jérémy Henri J. UL; Petit, François UL; Ormazabal, Gaston et al

in Proceedings of the International Workshop on Applications of Topological Data Analysis In conjunction with ECML PKDD 2019 (2019, September)

Auto-encoders are among the most popular neural network architecture for dimension reduction. They are composed of two parts: the encoder which maps the model distribution to a latent manifold and the ... [more ▼]

Auto-encoders are among the most popular neural network architecture for dimension reduction. They are composed of two parts: the encoder which maps the model distribution to a latent manifold and the decoder which maps the latent manifold to a reconstructed distribution. However, auto-encoders are known to provoke chaotically scattered data distribution in the latent manifold resulting in an incomplete reconstructed distribution. Current distance measures fail to detect this problem because they are not able to acknowledge the shape of the data manifolds, i.e. their topological features, and the scale at which the manifolds should be analyzed. We propose Persistent Homology for Wasserstein Auto-Encoders, called PHom-WAE, a new methodology to assess and measure the data distribution of a generative model. PHom-WAE minimizes the Wasserstein distance between the true distribution and the reconstructed distribution and uses persistent homology, the study of the topological features of a space at different spatial resolutions, to compare the nature of the latent manifold and the reconstructed distribution. Our experiments underline the potential of persistent homology for Wasserstein Auto-Encoders in comparison to Variational Auto-Encoders, another type of generative model. The experiments are conducted on a real-world data set particularly challenging for traditional distance measures and auto-encoders. PHom-WAE is the first methodology to propose a topological distance measure, the bottleneck distance, for Wasserstein Auto-Encoders used to compare decoded samples of high quality in the context of credit card transactions. [less ▲]

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See detailMQLV: Optimal Policy of Money Management in Retail Banking with Q-Learning
Charlier, Jérémy Henri J. UL; Ormazabal, Gaston; State, Radu UL et al

in Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on MIning DAta for financial applicationS (MIDAS 2019) co-located with the 2019 European Conference on Machine Learning and Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (ECML-PKDD 2019) (2019, September)

Reinforcement learning has become one of the best approach to train a computer game emulator capable of human level performance. In a reinforcement learning approach, an optimal value function is learned ... [more ▼]

Reinforcement learning has become one of the best approach to train a computer game emulator capable of human level performance. In a reinforcement learning approach, an optimal value function is learned across a set of actions, or decisions, that leads to a set of states giving different rewards, with the objective to maximize the overall reward. A policy assigns to each state-action pairs an expected return. We call an optimal policy a policy for which the value function is optimal. QLBS, Q-Learner in the Black-Scholes(-Merton) Worlds, applies the reinforcement learning concepts, and noticeably, the popular Q-learning algorithm, to the financial stochastic model of Black, Scholes and Merton. It is, however, specifically optimized for the geometric Brownian motion and the vanilla options. Its range of application is, therefore, limited to vanilla option pricing within the financial markets. We propose MQLV, Modified Q-Learner for the Vasicek model, a new reinforcement learning approach that determines the optimal policy of money management based on the aggregated financial transactions of the clients. It unlocks new frontiers to establish personalized credit card limits or bank loan applications, targeting the retail banking industry. MQLV extends the simulation to mean reverting stochastic diffusion processes and it uses a digital function, a Heaviside step function expressed in its discrete form, to estimate the probability of a future event such as a payment default. In our experiments, we first show the similarities between a set of historical financial transactions and Vasicek generated transactions and, then, we underline the potential of MQLV on generated Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, MQLV is the first Q-learning Vasicek-based methodology addressing transparent decision making processes in retail banking. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalized Trajectories for 2D and 3D Action Recognition
Papadopoulos, Konstantinos UL; Demisse, Girum UL; Ghorbel, Enjie UL et al

in Sensors (2019)

The Dense Trajectories concept is one of the most successful approaches in action recognition, suitable for scenarios involving a significant amount of motion. However, due to noise and background motion ... [more ▼]

The Dense Trajectories concept is one of the most successful approaches in action recognition, suitable for scenarios involving a significant amount of motion. However, due to noise and background motion, many generated trajectories are irrelevant to the actual human activity and can potentially lead to performance degradation. In this paper, we propose Localized Trajectories as an improved version of Dense Trajectories where motion trajectories are clustered around human body joints provided by RGB-D cameras and then encoded by local Bag-of-Words. As a result, the Localized Trajectories concept provides an advanced discriminative representation of actions. Moreover, we generalize Localized Trajectories to 3D by using the depth modality. One of the main advantages of 3D Localized Trajectories is that they describe radial displacements that are perpendicular to the image plane. Extensive experiments and analysis were carried out on five different datasets. [less ▲]

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See detailSamson and Delilah in medieval insular French: translation and adaptation
Leglu, Catherine UL

Book published by Palgrave Pivot (2018)

A study of the translations of Judges 16-18 into Old French verse and prose from the twelfth to the thirteenth centuries, as well as a comparison with musical versions on the same narrative. The book ... [more ▼]

A study of the translations of Judges 16-18 into Old French verse and prose from the twelfth to the thirteenth centuries, as well as a comparison with musical versions on the same narrative. The book examines the interpretations of Samson and of his relationship with Delilah up to the present day, then addresses the visual arts (ch.1), poetry and music (ch.2), prose translation (ch.3) and 14th-c. descriptions and illustrations of the narrative in psalters. [less ▲]

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See detailGiving voice to Samson and Delilah: troubadour and monastic songs of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Butterfield, Ardis; Hope, Henry; Souleau, Pauline (Eds.) Performing Medieval Text (2017)

This chapter explores recent theories concerning the performance and transmission of medieval song in vernacular troubadour lyric and Latin monastic traditions, engaging with other chapters in the themed ... [more ▼]

This chapter explores recent theories concerning the performance and transmission of medieval song in vernacular troubadour lyric and Latin monastic traditions, engaging with other chapters in the themed volume. It explores in particular the subjective and emotive first-person voice, in terms of the Psalter, arguing for greater attention to be paid to the imbrication of secular and sacred musical practice. The second part of the chapter focuses on the Latin dramatic song 'Samson, dux fortissime', which is preserved in Germany, Sicily and England, including Harley 978 (Reading Abbey), and has an exclusively monastic manuscript tradition. [less ▲]

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See detailToulouse
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Wallace, David (Ed.) Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1415 (2016)

A 7000 word chapter on the literary production, chiefly in Occitan, of Toulouse and adjacent regions (including the Crown of Aragon) in the 14th-15th centuries.

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See detailThe Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade: a sourcebook
Leglu, Catherine UL; Rist, Rebecca; Taylor, Clare

Book published by Routledge (2014)

A Sourcebook about the Albigensian Crusade (1209-1229) and the persecution of heretics in later years. Three sections provide translations of selected papal letters (Rist), troubadour poetry and prose ... [more ▼]

A Sourcebook about the Albigensian Crusade (1209-1229) and the persecution of heretics in later years. Three sections provide translations of selected papal letters (Rist), troubadour poetry and prose (Leglu) and inquisition registers (Taylor). [less ▲]

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See detailVernacular poetry and the spiritual Franciscans of the Languedoc: the poems of Raimon de Cornet
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Roach, Andrew P.; Simpson, James R. (Eds.) Heresy and the Making of European Culture: Medieval and Modern Perspectives, edited by Andrew P. Roach andJ ames R. Simpson (2013)

This chapter, in a book devoted to examining the importance of heresy in the construction of cultural identities in Europe, examines the evidence from recent historical studies of the Spiritual ... [more ▼]

This chapter, in a book devoted to examining the importance of heresy in the construction of cultural identities in Europe, examines the evidence from recent historical studies of the Spiritual Franciscans for the further contextualisation, and better understanding, of the autobiographical allusions and ideological remarks of the 14th-c. troubadour Raimon de Cornet [less ▲]

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See detailTranslating Lucretia: word, image and 'ethical non-indifference' in Simon de Hesdin's translation of Valerius Maximus's 'Facta et dicta memorabilia'
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Campbell, Emma; Mills, Robert (Eds.) Rethinking Medieval Translation. Ethics, Politics, Theory (2012)

An analysis of how illustrations functioned as a distinctive and important aspect of the translation of Latin versions of the story of the rape and suicide of Lucretia into Middle French texts, especially ... [more ▼]

An analysis of how illustrations functioned as a distinctive and important aspect of the translation of Latin versions of the story of the rape and suicide of Lucretia into Middle French texts, especially the 'Faits et dits memorables' (a translation-adaptation of Valerius Maximus's 'Facta et dicta memorabilia'). The study focuses on a selection of 14th- and 15th- century illuminations, and proposes also that the early modern 'Lucretia' portrait tradition should be viewed in the context of these images. [less ▲]

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See detailL'amant tenu par la bride : Itinéraires d'un motif courtois chez Gaucelm Faidit et sur un coffret limousin
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Goustine, Luc De (Ed.) Gaucelm Faidit: amours, voyages et débats (2011)

A comparison between selected lyrics and iconography of the late twelfth-century troubadour Gaucelm Faidit and a 'courtly love' image on a secular casket of Limoges enamel produced in the same period.

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See detailRebuilding the tower of Babel in Girart de Roussillon
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Ailes, Marianne; Saux, Francoise Le; Lawrence, Anne (Eds.) Medieval historical discourses: essays in honour of Professor Peter S. Noble (2008)

An exploration of how languages are treated in an epic poem that survives in hybrid blends of two vernaculars (French and Occitan).

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See detailMaternal consolatio in Antoine de La Sale's reconfort de Madame de Fresne
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Leglu, Catherine; Milner, Stephen (Eds.) The erotics of consolation: desire and distance in the late middle ages (2008)

One of the last writings attributed to Antoine de La Sale is a diptych of two short tales designed to console a bereaved mother by providing her with two examples of women in comparable situations. This ... [more ▼]

One of the last writings attributed to Antoine de La Sale is a diptych of two short tales designed to console a bereaved mother by providing her with two examples of women in comparable situations. This chapter analyses one of the two tales, which is presented as an eye-witness report by La Sale and which focuses on the Portuguese court, thus inviting the reader to see it as a memoir also intended for the duchess of Burgundy, Isabella of Portugal. [less ▲]

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See detailLanguages in conflict in Toulouse: las leys d'amors
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Modern Language Review (2008), 103(2), 383--396

The 'Leys d'Amors' (Laws of Love) is a work produced by the newly-founded Consistory of the city of Toulouse to teach correct Occitan poetry to those who wished to enter their annual competition, the ... [more ▼]

The 'Leys d'Amors' (Laws of Love) is a work produced by the newly-founded Consistory of the city of Toulouse to teach correct Occitan poetry to those who wished to enter their annual competition, the 'Jocs florals' (Jeux Floraux). The work of the Consistory was defined as an attempt to maintain a fading lyric tradition in a language that was changing. It is argued that the 'Leys d'Amors' betray a perception of the Occitan language as both familiar and foreign, in part through the rhetorical term 'allebolus', which refers to a 'strange' or somehow foreign term. [less ▲]

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See detailThe erotics of consolation: desire and distance in the late middle ages
Leglu, Catherine UL; Milner, Stephen

Book published by Palgrave Macmillan (2008)

A themed volume of essays on the varied ways in which medieval literature of the later Middle Ages engaged with discourses of love and loss, mourning and consolation from Classical and Christian ... [more ▼]

A themed volume of essays on the varied ways in which medieval literature of the later Middle Ages engaged with discourses of love and loss, mourning and consolation from Classical and Christian traditions, notably Boethius. The texts studied are in English, Italian, German and French literature. [less ▲]

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See detailPlace and movement in the old French Chanson de Toile
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Parergon (2007), 24(1), 21--39

Before the thirteenth century, Medieval theories of movement and of place and space depended on Latin translations of Greek sources. This article explores the treatment of stasis, place, and movement in ... [more ▼]

Before the thirteenth century, Medieval theories of movement and of place and space depended on Latin translations of Greek sources. This article explores the treatment of stasis, place, and movement in the corpus of 'chansons de toile', songs which typically depict an enclosed young woman's dreams of escape. [less ▲]

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