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See detailEU Executive Discretion and the Limits of Law
Mendes, Joana UL

Book published by Oxford University Press (in press)

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See detailA Methodology for Handling Data Movements by Anticipation: Position Paper
Bleuse, Raphaël UL; Lucarelli, Giorgio; Trystram, Denis

in Euro-Par 2018 Workshops (in press)

The enhanced capabilities of large scale parallel and distributed platforms produce a continuously increasing amount of data which have to be stored, exchanged and used by various tasks allocated on ... [more ▼]

The enhanced capabilities of large scale parallel and distributed platforms produce a continuously increasing amount of data which have to be stored, exchanged and used by various tasks allocated on different nodes of the system. The management of such a huge communication demand is crucial for reaching the best possible performance of the system. Meanwhile, we have to deal with more interferences as the trend is to use a single all-purpose interconnection network whatever the interconnect (tree-based hierarchies or topology-based heterarchies). There are two different types of communications, namely, the flows induced by data exchanges during the computations, and the flows related to Input/Output operations. We propose in this paper a general model for interference-aware scheduling, where explicit communications are replaced by external topological constraints. Specifically, the interferences of both communication types are reduced by adding geometric constraints on the allocation of tasks into machines. The proposed constraints reduce implicitly the data movements by restricting the set of possible allocations for each task. This methodology has been proved to be efficient in a recent study for a restricted interconnection network (a line/ring of processors which is an intermediate between a tree and higher dimensions grids/torus). The obtained results illustrated well the difficulty of the problem even on simple topologies, but also provided a pragmatic greedy solution, which was assessed to be efficient by simulations. We are currently extending this solution for more complex topologies. This work is a position paper which describes the methodology, it does not focus on the solving part. [less ▲]

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See detailAkkulturation als Integrationsressource
Maehler, Débora; Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Pickel, Gert; Decker, Oliver; Kailitz, Steffen (Eds.) et al Handbuch Integration (in press)

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See detailPolicies of Crises in the European Union Youth Field: How a Political Agenda Shapes the Concept of Youth.
Heinen, Andreas UL; Décieux, Jean Philippe; Willems, Helmut UL et al

in Grimm, Marc; Bauer, Ullrich; Ertugrul, Baris (Eds.) Children and Adolescents in Times of Crises in Europe (in press)

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See detailDevelopper la pensée algébrique à travers une activité de généralisation basée sur des motifs (patterns) figuratifs
Vlassis, Joëlle UL; Demonty, Isabelle; Squalli, Hassane

in Nouveaux cahiers de la recherche en éducation (in press), 3

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See detailShape optimization of structures with cutouts by an efficient approach based on XIGA and chaotic particle swarm optimization
Wang, Chao; Yu, Tiantang; Shao, Guojian et al

in European Journal of Mechanics. A, Solids (in press)

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See detailUsing Passive Data Collection Methods to Learn Complex Mobility Patterns: An Exploratory Analysis
Toader, Bogdan UL; Cantelmo, Guido UL; Popescu, Mioara et al

Scientific Conference (in press)

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See detailTen-Item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10): Measurement invariance and cross-cultural validation across seven language-based samples
Király, Orsolya; Bothe, Beáta; Ramos-Diaz, Jano et al

in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors (in press)

The Ten-Item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10) is a short screening instrument developed to assess Internet gaming disorder (IGD) as proposed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental ... [more ▼]

The Ten-Item Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10) is a short screening instrument developed to assess Internet gaming disorder (IGD) as proposed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM–5), adopting a concise, clear, and consistent item-wording. According to initial studies conducted in 2014, the instrument showed promising psychometric characteristics. The present study tested the psychometric properties, including language and gender invariance, in a large international sample of online gamers. In this study, data were collected from 7,193 participants comprising Hungarian (n = 3,924), Iranian (n = 791), English-speaking (n = 754), French-speaking (n = 421), Norwegian (n = 195), Czech (n = 496), and Peruvian (n = 612) online gamers via gaming-related websites and gaming-related social-networking-site groups. A unidimensional factor structure provided a good fit to the data in all language-based samples. In addition, results indicated both language and gender invariance on the level of scalar invariance. Criterion and construct validity of the IGDT-10 was supported by its strong association with the Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire and moderate association with weekly gaming time, psychopathological symptoms, and impulsivity. The proportions of each sample that met the cut-off score on the IGDT-10 varied between 1.61% and 4.48% in the individual samples, except for the Peruvian sample (13.44%). The IGDT-10 shows robust psychometric properties and appears suitable for conducting cross-cultural and gender comparisons across seven languages. [less ▲]

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See detailThe ‘Jewish Freedom Fighter’. The legacy of Naftali Botwin and the construction of a transnational cult of Jewish heroes
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

in Royer, Clara; Balazs (Eds.) Cult of Heroes in Central Europe from the 1880s to the Second World War – Transnational and Transdisciplinary Aspects. (in press)

This article discusses the transnational heroic cult that developed in Yiddish communist circles around the figure of Naftali Botwin, a young Polish-Jewish communist who was executed by Polish authorities ... [more ▼]

This article discusses the transnational heroic cult that developed in Yiddish communist circles around the figure of Naftali Botwin, a young Polish-Jewish communist who was executed by Polish authorities in the city of Lwów, following a trial in which he was convicted for assassinating a police infiltrator in the ranks of the Polish Communist Party (KPP). The discussion highlights how Botwin’s legacy was appropriated in multiple, and sometimes contrasting, ways in the decades following his death, especially within the context of the creation of the Botwin Company in the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War. In doing so it will also highlight the transnational nature of this cult, as his memory lived on through poems, plays and publications that circulated through the worldwide networks and communicative spaces of Jewish (leftist) émigrés. [less ▲]

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See detailProbing gambling urge as a state construct: Evidence from a sample of community gamblers
Canale, Natale; Cornil, Aurélien; Giroux, Isabelle et al

in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors (in press)

Little effort has been made to systematically test the psychometric properties of the Gambling Craving Scale (GACS; Young & Wohl, 2009). The GACS is adapted from the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges ... [more ▼]

Little effort has been made to systematically test the psychometric properties of the Gambling Craving Scale (GACS; Young & Wohl, 2009). The GACS is adapted from the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (Tiffany & Drobes, 1991) and thus measures gambling-related urge. Crucially, the validation of scales assessing gambling urge is complex, as this construct is better conceptualized as a state (a transient and context-determined phenomenon). In the present study, we tested the psychometric properties of the French version of the GACS with 2 independent samples of community gamblers following an induction procedure delivered through an audio-guided imagery sequence aimed at promoting gambling urge. This procedure was specifically used to ensure the assessment of gambling urge as a state variable. Participants also completed measures of gambling severity, gambling cognitions and motives, impulsivity, and affect. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that the original 3-factor solution (anticipation, desire, relief) did not fit the data well. Additional exploratory factor analysis (EFA) suggested instead a 2-factor solution: intention and desire to gamble dimension and a relief dimension. The factorial structure resulting from the EFA was tested with CFA in a second independent sample, resulting in an acceptable fit. The 2 dimensions presented good internal reliability and correlated differentially with the other study’s variables. The current study showed that, similar to what has been reported for substance-related urges, gambling urges are adequately probed with a bidimensional model. The findings suggest that the French GACS has good psychometric properties, legitimizing its use in research and clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailA Big Data Demand Estimation Framework for Modelling of Urban Congested Networks
Cantelmo, Guido UL; Viti, Francesco UL

in CSUM 2018, AISC 879 proceedings (in press)

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See detailEnhancement motivation to drink predicts binge drinking in adolescence: a longitudinal study in a community sample
Lannoy, Séverine; Dormal, Valérie; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse (in press)

Background: Binge drinking, characterized by alternations between intense alcohol intakes and abstinence periods, is the most frequent alcohol consumption pattern among adolescents and has been repeatedly ... [more ▼]

Background: Binge drinking, characterized by alternations between intense alcohol intakes and abstinence periods, is the most frequent alcohol consumption pattern among adolescents and has been repeatedly associated with cognitive and cerebral impairments. Objectives: In view of these harmful consequences, it appears crucial to disentangle the psychological factors involved in the emergence of binge drinking in adolescence, and centrally the role played by drinking motives, which have been strongly related to binge drinking habits. Methods: Using a longitudinal design, the present study explored the role of drinking motives (i.e. social order, conformity, enhancement, coping) in the emergence of binge drinking among young adolescents from the community. One hundred and forty-four young adolescents (81 girls) took part in a research assessing alcohol consumption and drinking motives at two assessment times (T1 and T2), with a one-year interval. After data checking, 101 adolescents (57 girls) aged from 12 to 15 years old were included in the study. Results: Correlations showed strong relationships between drinking motives and binge drinking. Additional regression analyses were then computed to determine how drinking motives assessed at T1 predicted binge drinking at T2, while controlling for global alcohol use. Results showed that the statistical model explained 60% of the binge drinking variance. In particular, the enhancement motivation, which is related to the search for the enjoyable sensations felt when drinking alcohol, constituted the unique predictor of future binge drinking. Conversely, in contrast with previous studies, social motives did not predict binge drinking in young adolescents. Conclusion: These findings highlight the central role of enhancement motivation (e.g., focusing on the positive expectancies towards alcohol) in youths’ alcohol consumption and call for the development of preventive interventions. It also suggests that the previously reported relationship between social motives and college drinking does not seem to play a key role in the early steps of binge drinking habits. [less ▲]

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See detailA joint exploration of executive subcomponents in binge drinking
Lannoy, Séverine; Dormal, Valérie; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Addiction Research and Theory (in press)

Background: Executive deficits have been largely reported in young binge drinkers during the last decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the specificity of these deficits and their variation across ... [more ▼]

Background: Executive deficits have been largely reported in young binge drinkers during the last decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the specificity of these deficits and their variation across executive subcomponents. The current study aimed at offering a theoretically-grounded and specific exploration of the differential deficits observed across executive functions in binge drinkers. Method: A total of forty university students (20 binge drinkers; 10 women, and 20 matched controls; 12 women) performed three validated neuropsychological tasks, each exploring a specific executive function, namely shifting, updating, and inhibition (specifically Resistance to Distractor Interference). Tasks were presented to participants in pseudo-randomized order. Repeated measure analyses of variance were performed for each task to compare groups’ performance. Results: A dissociation was observed across executive tasks regarding group differences: compared to controls, binge drinkers demonstrated preserved performance for shifting and updating abilities, but impaired inhibition. These results support the central role of inhibitory control in excessive alcohol consumption. In contrast with severe alcohol-use disorders, binge drinking does not appear related to a general executive deficit. Conclusions: In view of the pivotal role played by inhibition impairments in the emergence of severe alcohol-use disorders, the present data claim for developing individualized evaluation and rehabilitation programs focusing on this executive subcomponent to improve control abilities at early stages of alcohol-related disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailCoercion-Resistant Voting in Linear Time via Fully Homomorphic Encryption: Towards a Quantum-Safe Scheme
Roenne, Peter UL; Atashpendar, Arash UL; Kristian, Gjøsteen et al

in Financial Cryptography and Data Security 2019. FC 2019: International Workshops, CIW, VOTING, and WTSC (in press)

We present an approach for performing the tallying work in the coercion-resistant JCJ voting protocol, introduced by Juels, Catalano, and Jakobsson, in linear time using fully homomorphic encryption (FHE ... [more ▼]

We present an approach for performing the tallying work in the coercion-resistant JCJ voting protocol, introduced by Juels, Catalano, and Jakobsson, in linear time using fully homomorphic encryption (FHE). The suggested enhancement also paves the path towards making JCJ quantum-resistant, while leaving the underlying structure of JCJ intact. The exhaustive, comparison-based approach of JCJ using plaintext equivalence tests leads to a quadratic blow-up in the number of votes, which makes the tallying process rather impractical in realistic settings with a large number of voters. We show how the removal of invalid votes can be done in linear time via a solution based on recent advances in various FHE primitives such as hashing, zero-knowledge proofs of correct decryption, verifiable shuffles and threshold FHE. We conclude by touching upon some of the advantages and challenges of such an approach, followed by a discussion of further security and post-quantum considerations. [less ▲]

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See detailA Critical Co/Autoethnographic Exploration of Self: Becoming Science Education Researchers in Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Landscapes
Park, Jennifer; Wilmes, Sara UL

in Bazzul, Jesse; Siry, Christina (Eds.) Critical voices in science education research: Narratives of academic journeys (in press)

In today’s globalized society, linguistic and cultural worlds collide bringing people, cultures, and languages together in diverse ways that can influence a person’s identity and sense of self. Due to the ... [more ▼]

In today’s globalized society, linguistic and cultural worlds collide bringing people, cultures, and languages together in diverse ways that can influence a person’s identity and sense of self. Due to the porous boundaries of people’s identities, increased globalization can lead to identity confusion, which can influence how open individuals are to integration (Hermans and Hermans-Konopka 2010). This confusion increases as countries across the world experience what Vertovec (2006) describes as super-diversity, a “world in one city” (Benedictus and Godwin 2005, p. 2). Super-diversity can be described as a dynamic interplay of variables among increasing numbers of new, small and scattered, multiple-origin, transnationally connected, socio-economically differentiated, and legally stratified number of immigrants throughout the world (Vertovec 2007). While some researchers have claimed that globalization can result in a loss of cultural diversity (Tomlinson 2003), the integration of plurilingual and pluricultural people in diverse contexts can also result in greater awareness of diversity. To understand the impact of globalization on an individual’s identity and sense of self, research can be a powerful tool. In particular, research that critically focuses on examining oneself can reveal new knowledge of the self that may inform one’s research endeavors. In this chapter, we share the process of collaborative autoethnography (co-autoethnography), that we used to individually and collaboratively examine and reflect upon our experiences at the start of our doctoral research paths. We used this critical methodology to help us make sense of our individual and collective experiences in two different multilingual/multicultural research settings – South Korea and Luxembourg. Specifically, we attempt to tease apart the relationship that exists between language, culture, and self. In addition, building from a discussion of the benefits and challenges of implementing this method, we share what we learned from this narrative process about ourselves, and about how we engaged and continued to engage in science education research. We share our co-autoethnographic process that helped us push the boundaries of our research, and that gave each of us a deeper understanding of our own positionality within our research contexts. We do so with the hopes of encouraging other researchers to undergo such processes in order to further investigate their own self and the position of their selves in their research. [less ▲]

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See detailBook review: Bessey, Valérie et Werner Paravicini: Guerre des manifestes : Charles le Téméraire et ses ennemis (1465-1475)
Genot, Gilles UL

in Hemecht: Zeitschrift für Luxemburger Geschichte (in press)

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See detailSelf-Regulation of Fundamental Rights? The EU Code of Conduct on Hate Speech, Related Initiatives and Beyond
Quintel, Teresa Alegra UL; Ullrich, Carsten UL

in Ojanen, Tuomas; Petkova, Bilyana (Eds.) Fundamental Rights Protection Online: the Future Regulation of Intermediaries (in press)

This contribution will give a brief overview of EU legislation encouraging self-regulation, such as codes of conduct, communications and recommendations and propose an alternative approach towards ... [more ▼]

This contribution will give a brief overview of EU legislation encouraging self-regulation, such as codes of conduct, communications and recommendations and propose an alternative approach towards fighting illegal content on online platforms, which ventures squarely into co-regulation. There is no formal and straightforward definition on what constitutes illegal hate speech. However, hate speech might be classified as targeting minority groups in a way that promotes violence or social disorder and hatred. The use of social media and online platforms to spread illegal content and hate speech has increased progressively during recent years, as content may be disseminated anonymously and further shared by other users. Therefore, the timely removal or blocking of access to illegal content is essential to limit the wider dissemination and harm of individuals targeted by hate speech. The prominent role of online platforms in revolutionizing modern communication and as influencers of the public opinion has increasingly come to the attention of policy makers. Since online platforms provide an important stage for phenomena such as ‘fake news’, ‘hate speech’ or ‘disinformation’, the pressure to take more responsibility over content hosted by them has grown. The EU Commission took action via several attempts to set certain rules for online intermediaries, mostly relying on non-binding agreements, often in the form of self-regulatory measures, such as codes of conduct, guidelines and recommendations. These measures have raised concerns regarding possible limitations of Freedom of Expression, because they require online platforms to adjudicate on the legality of content, often by relying on automated systems. Meanwhile decisions over the unlawfulness of hate speech and “disinformation” are often notoriously difficult. The deployment of algorithms to analyse the content generated on platforms, such as recognition and filtering technologies, bear risks and pitfalls of automated compliance solutions. Although the use of algorithms to monitor content online still happens based on the “human-in-the-loop principle”, the diligence and efficiency with which illegal content can be reviewed is also dependent on the financial capacity and resources of each company. In addition, these privatized removal procedures maybe influenced by commercial interests and lack effective appeals mechanisms. All these issues throw up serious questions about the democratic legitimacy of self-regulatory removal procedures An alternative solution, proposed in this article, would require platforms to apply a risk-based approach to preventing and removing illegal content. The norms and standards of such an approach would be based on duty of care and be subject to regulatory oversight. It is suggested that the current self-regulatory proposals be replaced by co-regulatory solutions. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating fibres' material parameter distributions from limited data with the help of Bayesian inference
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL

in European Journal of Mechanics. A, Solids (in press)

Numerous materials are essentially structures of discrete fibres, yarns or struts. Considering these materials at their discrete scale, one may distinguish two types of intrinsic randomness that affect ... [more ▼]

Numerous materials are essentially structures of discrete fibres, yarns or struts. Considering these materials at their discrete scale, one may distinguish two types of intrinsic randomness that affect the structural behaviours of these discrete structures: geometrical randomness and material randomness. Identifying the material randomness is an experimentally demanding task, because many small fibres, yarns or struts need to be tested, which are not easy to handle. To avoid the testing of hundreds of constituents, this contribution proposes an identification approach that only requires a few dozen of constituents to be tested (we use twenty to be exact). The identification approach is applied to articially generated measurements, so that the identified values can be compared to the true values. Another question this contribution aims to answer is how precise the material randomness needs to be identified, if the geometrical randomness will also influence the macroscale behaviour of these discrete networks. We therefore also study the effect of the identified material randomness to that of the actual material randomness for three types of structures; each with an increasing level of geometrical randomness. [less ▲]

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See detailRemittances and credit in developed and developing countries: A dynamic panel analysis
Leon, Florian UL; Fromentin, Vincent

in Research in International Business and Finance (in press)

This article investigates the impact of remittances on credit in 30 developing (low and middle income) countries and 27 developed (high-income) countries during the period of 2000-2014. This paper differs ... [more ▼]

This article investigates the impact of remittances on credit in 30 developing (low and middle income) countries and 27 developed (high-income) countries during the period of 2000-2014. This paper differs from existing literature in two ways. First, we distinguish the impact of remittances on credit in both the short run and the long run. Second, we investigate whether remittances influence credit provided to households and credit provided to firms differently, thanks to a new dataset. Our results indicate that (i) remittances have a positive impact on credit in the long run but no impact in the short run; (ii) remittances have a stronger effect on household credit than on firm credit in developing countries; and, (iii) remittances stimulate credit provision through firm credit in developed countries. [less ▲]

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