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See detailA Bilingual Study for Personalized Sentiment Model PERSEUS
Guo, Siwen UL; Schommer, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 10)

This paper investigates the significance of analyzing language preferences in personalized sentiment analysis. Motivated by the considerable amount of text generated by multilingual speakers on social ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the significance of analyzing language preferences in personalized sentiment analysis. Motivated by the considerable amount of text generated by multilingual speakers on social platforms, we focus on constructing a single model that is able to analyze sentiments in a multilingual environment. In particular, Twitter texts are used in this research where the choice of language can be switched at a message-, sentence-, word- or topic-level. To represent and analyze the text, we extract concepts and main topics from the text and apply a recurrent neural network with attention mechanism in order to learn the relation between the lexical choices and the opinions of each sentiment holder. The personalized sentiment model PERSEUS is applied as the central structure of this research. Moreover, a language index is added to each concept to enable multilingual analysis, which provides a solution for analyzing code-switching in the text as well. In this work, English and German are chosen for a pilot study, and an artificial corpus is created to evaluate the situation with multilingual speakers. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnual report on migration and asylum (2017)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2018)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2017 (2.322 applications) compared to the levels registered pre- ‘migration crisis’ (1.091 in 2014). However, the number of registrations remained relatively stable if compared to the two preceding years (2.447 in 2015 and 2.035 in 2016). This relative stability in numbers also reflected on the general public and policy debate in the field of migration and asylum. Since 2016, its focus has continuously shifted from an ‘emergency’ discourse axed on the implementation of reception measures and conditions towards discussions on longer-term integration measures and policies. In this regard, the newly introduced Guided Integration Trail (parcours d’intégration accompagné - PIA) can be considered a flagship project of OLAI, the national agency responsible for the reception and integration of foreigners. This multidisciplinary package of measures aims to empower applicants and beneficiaries of international protection and to support them in developing their life project. The trail, compulsory for all adult applicants for international protection, consists of a linguistic component and a civic component and is split into three phases. Although increasing housing capacities for the reception of applicants for international protection was high on national authorities’ agenda, housing remained a challenging aspect of the asylum system and triggered debate on a national scale. Alongside access to training, problems related to housing were among the issues most frequently raised by applicants for international protection in 2017. The lack of affordable housing on the private market, an increasing number of family reunifications as well as the increasing number of beneficiaries and persons who have been issued a return decision who remain housed in structures of OLAI were all identified as interplaying barriers for finding available accommodation for applicants for international protection. The difficulties with the construction of modular housing structures also persisted in 2017. A certain reticence of the population towards the construction of these so-called ‘container villages, planned in response to the increasing influx that started in August 2015, was visible in the appeals introduced into Luxembourg’s First Instance Administrative Courts to annul the land-use plans related to the projects. Living conditions in the various reception facilities were also one of the subjects of discussion in 2017. This included a debate on the (lack of) kitchen infrastructure in reception facilities and the varying systems for provision of food, the types of food available, as well as the availability of internet. As an answer to the resurgence of an increased influx of applicants of international protection from the Western Balkans in early 2017, a new ‘ultra-accelerated procedure’ was put in place for applicants of international protection stemming from the Western Balkans. According to the state authorities, the ultra-accelerated procedure was set up to take pressure off the reception facilities, but also as a deterrent to avoid creating false hopes for long-term stay. In April 2017, a ‘semi-open return structure’ (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg – SHUK) was put in place, from which people are transferred to states applying the Dublin regulation. Due to home custody (assignation à résidence), the SHUK is considered to be an alternative to detention by national authorities. The newly created structure as well as the related conditions for assignment, were nevertheless criticised by civil society. The outcry among civil society was equally high during and after the adoption the Law of 8 March 2017, which endorses the extension of the permitted period of detention of adults or families with children from 72 hours to 7 days, in order to improve the organisation of the return and ensures that it is carried out successfully. A commission in charge of determining the best interests of unaccompanied minors applying for international protection was decided at the end of 2017. The commission is in charge of carrying out individual assessments regarding the best interest of the child with the aim of delivering an authorisation of stay or a return decision. Among the elements taken into consideration when the best interest of the child is evaluated in the context of a potential return decision is information provided by the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The latter made an agreement with the Directorate of Immigration in 2017 to search for the parents of UAMs in the country of origin. With the focus of debates having slowly shifted towards long-term integration issues, the Council of Government also approved the elaboration of a new multiannual national action plan on integration. The plan will be based on two axes: (1) the reception and follow-up of applicants for international protection and (2) the integration of Luxembourg’s non-Luxembourgish residents. Luxembourg’s National Employment Agency (ADEM) set up a “cellule BPI” (beneficiaries of international protection cell) in its Employer Service in early 2017. This cell provides employers with information regarding job applications and evaluations of the competences of beneficiaries of international protection. A new law on the Luxembourgish nationality entered into force on 1 April 2017. Given the particular demographic situation of Luxembourg characterised by a significant increase in the total population and a decrease in the proportion of Luxembourgers in the total population, the reform intends to promote the societal and political integration of non-Luxembourgish citizens and to strengthen cohesion within the national community. The main changes introduced by the law include a decreased length of residence requirement for naturalisation (from 7 to 5 years), the right of birthplace (jus soli) of the first generation, a simplified way of acquiring Luxembourgish nationality by ‘option’, as well as new scenarios to avoid cases of statelessness. The law maintains previous linguistic requirements but makes some adjustments in order to prevent the language condition from becoming an insurmountable obstacle. Ahead of the local elections held on 8 October 2017, the Ministry of Family, Integration and the Greater Region launched a national information and awareness-raising campaign titled “Je peux voter” (I can vote) in January 2017. This campaign aimed to motivate Luxembourg’s foreign population to register on the electoral roll for the local elections. The government’s intention to legislate face concealment was arguably one of the most debated topics in the field related to community life and integration in the broader sense, both in parliament as well as in the media and public sphere. Bill n°7179 aims to modify article 563 of the Penal Code and to create the prohibition of face concealment in certain public spaces. The bill defines face concealment as the action of covering part of or all of the face in a way of rendering the identification of the person impossible and provides a wide variety of examples, such as the wearing of a motor cycle helmet, a balaclava or a full-face veil. Opposing views among stakeholders, whether political parties, public institutions, civil society or the media, emerged with regard to the necessity to legislate in the matter and if so, on the basis of which grounds and to what extent. The phenomenon of migration has also led to a more heterogeneous population in Luxembourg’s schools. To face this situation, the education authorities continued to diversify Luxembourg’s offer in education and training, creating for instance a bigger offer for youngsters and adults who do not master any of Luxembourg’s vehicular languages, offering more alphabetisation courses or basic instruction courses. The Minister for National Education continued to develop and adapt the school offer to the increased heterogeneity by increasing the international and European school offer, introducing of a new mediation service and putting in place a plurilingual education programme. In the area of legal migration, the most significant changes concerned admission policies of specific categories of third-country nationals. In this respect, bill n°7188 mainly aims to transpose Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing. The directive aims to make the European Union a world centre of excellence for studies and training, while favouring contacts between people and favouring their mobility, these two being important elements of the European Union’s external policy. Bill N°7188 intends to facilitate and simplify the procedures for intra-European mobility of TCN researchers and students. Moreover, the proposed changes include incentive mechanisms to retain students and researchers. To this end, it proposes that students and researchers, once they have completed their studies/research, can be issued a residence permit for “private reasons” for a duration of 9 months at most in view of finding employment or creating a business. Finally, bill n°7188 also foresees provisions to regulate the family reunification of a researcher staying in Luxembourg in the context of short- and long-term mobility with his/her nuclear family. The legislator furthermore transposed Directive 2014/36 on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66 on temporary intragroup transfer into national law, and adapted Luxembourg’s immigration law to the needs to the economy, by introducing, amongst other things, and authorisation of stay for investors. Organising the admission of stay and the issuance of authorisations of stay was also a key component within the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidary development. Other objectives of the agreement include the promotion of the movement of people, detailing readmission procedures, fighting against irregular migration, strengthening the legal establishment and integration of the concerned nationals, as well as the mobilisation of skills and resources of migrants in favour of solidary development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 UL)
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See detailRapport annuel sur les migrations et l'asile (2017)
Jacobs, Sarah UL; Adao Do Carmo, Kelly UL; Petry, David UL et al

Report (2018)

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained ... [more ▼]

The present report provides an overview of the main developments and debates in relation to migration and asylum in Luxembourg in 2017. The number of people applying for international protection remained high in 2017 (2.322 applications) compared to the levels registered pre- ‘migration crisis’ (1.091 in 2014). However, the number of registrations remained relatively stable if compared to the two preceding years (2.447 in 2015 and 2.035 in 2016). This relative stability in numbers also reflected on the general public and policy debate in the field of migration and asylum. Since 2016, its focus has continuously shifted from an ‘emergency’ discourse axed on the implementation of reception measures and conditions towards discussions on longer-term integration measures and policies. In this regard, the newly introduced Guided Integration Trail (parcours d’intégration accompagné - PIA) can be considered a flagship project of OLAI, the national agency responsible for the reception and integration of foreigners. This multidisciplinary package of measures aims to empower applicants and beneficiaries of international protection and to support them in developing their life project. The trail, compulsory for all adult applicants for international protection, consists of a linguistic component and a civic component and is split into three phases. Although increasing housing capacities for the reception of applicants for international protection was high on national authorities’ agenda, housing remained a challenging aspect of the asylum system and triggered debate on a national scale. Alongside access to training, problems related to housing were among the issues most frequently raised by applicants for international protection in 2017. The lack of affordable housing on the private market, an increasing number of family reunifications as well as the increasing number of beneficiaries and persons who have been issued a return decision who remain housed in structures of OLAI were all identified as interplaying barriers for finding available accommodation for applicants for international protection. The difficulties with the construction of modular housing structures also persisted in 2017. A certain reticence of the population towards the construction of these so-called ‘container villages, planned in response to the increasing influx that started in August 2015, was visible in the appeals introduced into Luxembourg’s First Instance Administrative Courts to annul the land-use plans related to the projects. Living conditions in the various reception facilities were also one of the subjects of discussion in 2017. This included a debate on the (lack of) kitchen infrastructure in reception facilities and the varying systems for provision of food, the types of food available, as well as the availability of internet. As an answer to the resurgence of an increased influx of applicants of international protection from the Western Balkans in early 2017, a new ‘ultra-accelerated procedure’ was put in place for applicants of international protection stemming from the Western Balkans. According to the state authorities, the ultra-accelerated procedure was set up to take pressure off the reception facilities, but also as a deterrent to avoid creating false hopes for long-term stay. In April 2017, a ‘semi-open return structure’ (Structure d’hébergement d’urgence au Kirchberg – SHUK) was put in place, from which people are transferred to states applying the Dublin regulation. Due to home custody (assignation à résidence), the SHUK is considered to be an alternative to detention by national authorities. The newly created structure as well as the related conditions for assignment, were nevertheless criticised by civil society. The outcry among civil society was equally high during and after the adoption the Law of 8 March 2017, which endorses the extension of the permitted period of detention of adults or families with children from 72 hours to 7 days, in order to improve the organisation of the return and ensures that it is carried out successfully. A commission in charge of determining the best interests of unaccompanied minors applying for international protection was decided at the end of 2017. The commission is in charge of carrying out individual assessments regarding the best interest of the child with the aim of delivering an authorisation of stay or a return decision. Among the elements taken into consideration when the best interest of the child is evaluated in the context of a potential return decision is information provided by the International Organization for Migration (IOM). The latter made an agreement with the Directorate of Immigration in 2017 to search for the parents of UAMs in the country of origin. With the focus of debates having slowly shifted towards long-term integration issues, the Council of Government also approved the elaboration of a new multiannual national action plan on integration. The plan will be based on two axes: (1) the reception and follow-up of applicants for international protection and (2) the integration of Luxembourg’s non-Luxembourgish residents. Luxembourg’s National Employment Agency (ADEM) set up a “cellule BPI” (beneficiaries of international protection cell) in its Employer Service in early 2017. This cell provides employers with information regarding job applications and evaluations of the competences of beneficiaries of international protection. A new law on the Luxembourgish nationality entered into force on 1 April 2017. Given the particular demographic situation of Luxembourg characterised by a significant increase in the total population and a decrease in the proportion of Luxembourgers in the total population, the reform intends to promote the societal and political integration of non-Luxembourgish citizens and to strengthen cohesion within the national community. The main changes introduced by the law include a decreased length of residence requirement for naturalisation (from 7 to 5 years), the right of birthplace (jus soli) of the first generation, a simplified way of acquiring Luxembourgish nationality by ‘option’, as well as new scenarios to avoid cases of statelessness. The law maintains previous linguistic requirements but makes some adjustments in order to prevent the language condition from becoming an insurmountable obstacle. Ahead of the local elections held on 8 October 2017, the Ministry of Family, Integration and the Greater Region launched a national information and awareness-raising campaign titled “Je peux voter” (I can vote) in January 2017. This campaign aimed to motivate Luxembourg’s foreign population to register on the electoral roll for the local elections. The government’s intention to legislate face concealment was arguably one of the most debated topics in the field related to community life and integration in the broader sense, both in parliament as well as in the media and public sphere. Bill n°7179 aims to modify article 563 of the Penal Code and to create the prohibition of face concealment in certain public spaces. The bill defines face concealment as the action of covering part of or all of the face in a way of rendering the identification of the person impossible and provides a wide variety of examples, such as the wearing of a motor cycle helmet, a balaclava or a full-face veil. Opposing views among stakeholders, whether political parties, public institutions, civil society or the media, emerged with regard to the necessity to legislate in the matter and if so, on the basis of which grounds and to what extent. The phenomenon of migration has also led to a more heterogeneous population in Luxembourg’s schools. To face this situation, the education authorities continued to diversify Luxembourg’s offer in education and training, creating for instance a bigger offer for youngsters and adults who do not master any of Luxembourg’s vehicular languages, offering more alphabetisation courses or basic instruction courses. The Minister for National Education continued to develop and adapt the school offer to the increased heterogeneity by increasing the international and European school offer, introducing of a new mediation service and putting in place a plurilingual education programme. In the area of legal migration, the most significant changes concerned admission policies of specific categories of third-country nationals. In this respect, bill n°7188 mainly aims to transpose Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing. The directive aims to make the European Union a world centre of excellence for studies and training, while favouring contacts between people and favouring their mobility, these two being important elements of the European Union’s external policy. Bill N°7188 intends to facilitate and simplify the procedures for intra-European mobility of TCN researchers and students. Moreover, the proposed changes include incentive mechanisms to retain students and researchers. To this end, it proposes that students and researchers, once they have completed their studies/research, can be issued a residence permit for “private reasons” for a duration of 9 months at most in view of finding employment or creating a business. Finally, bill n°7188 also foresees provisions to regulate the family reunification of a researcher staying in Luxembourg in the context of short- and long-term mobility with his/her nuclear family. The legislator furthermore transposed Directive 2014/36 on seasonal workers and Directive 2014/66 on temporary intragroup transfer into national law, and adapted Luxembourg’s immigration law to the needs to the economy, by introducing, amongst other things, and authorisation of stay for investors. Organising the admission of stay and the issuance of authorisations of stay was also a key component within the agreement between Luxembourg and Cape Verde on the concerted management of migratory flows and solidary development. Other objectives of the agreement include the promotion of the movement of people, detailing readmission procedures, fighting against irregular migration, strengthening the legal establishment and integration of the concerned nationals, as well as the mobilisation of skills and resources of migrants in favour of solidary development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 UL)
See detailSelf-Assessment in Elementary School with a Tablet-Computer-Based Tool: A Chance for Fairer Educational Assessment?
Villanyi, Denise UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

Student self-assessment (SSA) is beneficial for students’ learning and achievement through processes of self-regulation. Furthermore, SSA is a valuable feedback for the teachers on students’ perceptions ... [more ▼]

Student self-assessment (SSA) is beneficial for students’ learning and achievement through processes of self-regulation. Furthermore, SSA is a valuable feedback for the teachers on students’ perceptions of their competencies. SSA can complete teachers’ view on and judgment about the students’ competencies and it can help teachers to adapt teaching and learning activities to better meet the needs of the students. Knowing that teachers’ assessments can be biased regarding students’ ethnic or immigration background, students’ SAs might be an important complementary source of information that increases fairness in educational assessment. Despite its proven benefits, the implementation of self-assessment (SA) in elementary school classrooms is limited, most probably due to the skepticism towards learners’ SA accuracy at all ages, but even more so when students are younger. The objective of the present dissertation was to capture students’ SAs of key academic competencies with an innovative tool—a tablet-computer-based SA-tool—, and to make it visible to teachers by giving them feedback on their students’ SAs. The dissertation is based on three empirical studies. In the first study, we investigated, whether third- and fourth-graders have the ability to assess key academic competencies (mathematics, German reading comprehension) with acceptable accuracy, when provided with an innovative tablet-computer-based tool that was designed respecting the requirements that facilitate SA for that age group. The second study concentrated on the domain of mathematics. We investigated how mathematics self-efficacy, the construct measured with the tool, relates to other competence beliefs such as mathematics self-concept and general academic self-concept and covariates (standardized tests in mathematics, reading comprehension, listening, comprehension; general academic and mathematics interest; general academic and mathematics anxiety; and gender). In the third study, we investigated whether feedbacks on students’ SAs and achievement test results (from Luxembourg school monitoring) are valuable information for teachers that they would triangulate with their own assessments. We hypothesized that the information captured via SSA and achievement test would trigger critical reflection in teachers, and offer them feedback on the appropriateness of their assessments (unbiased versus biased treatment) and thus make educational assessment fairer. The findings of the three studies contribute to answer the questions of how SA can be implemented in the classroom (Grades 3 and 4) in a way that it becomes meaningful to students and teachers, and whether SSA in the classroom is a chance for fairer educational assessment. Based on the results of Studies 1 and 2, we conclude that with an appropriate SA-tool, displaying self-efficacy items on task level on tablet-computer, third- and fourth-graders were able to assess key academic competencies with acceptable accuracy and thus to give valuable information to the teachers. Based on the results of Study 3, we conclude that teachers were able to triangulate the information from students’ SAs with their own assessments and with external achievement test results. Indeed, SSA in the classroom can be a chance for fairer educational assessment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (7 UL)
See detailFrom the Dustbin of History: Rethinking the History of Amateur Media in a Historical Conversation
Aasman, Susan; van der Heijden, Tim UL; Slootweg, Tom

Scientific Conference (2018, August 23)

“Amateurs of one era are not the amateurs of another, even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them”, is an intriguing statement made by Lisa Gitelman (2014). Overall, Gitelman’s answer would ... [more ▼]

“Amateurs of one era are not the amateurs of another, even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them”, is an intriguing statement made by Lisa Gitelman (2014). Overall, Gitelman’s answer would favor a certain level of complexity as to avoid ‘sloppy media history’ even when a continuous tradition exists to connect them (137). Rather, we should explore how amateur filmmakers ‘doing and its do-ability’ can differ as they are situated in broader historical contexts. Building on this idea of a complex and dynamic history, that consists of a diversity of histories, we propose to start a semi-structured conversation between three experts in amateur media and between the experts and the audience. We seek to follow traces that connect or disconnect the various discourses and practices in amateur media history in which amateurism encountered predictions, hopes, and tried out appropriations of amateur media technologies as an alternative/marginal media space. The set of related concepts that will be deployed through time and in relation to different historical contexts are: marginality, democratization, resistance, alternative, avant-garde, subversive and experimental. By comparing, contrasting and evaluating these set of concepts we hope to add to the overall goal of the conference to open up a space to rethink historiography. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailAlpha-synuclein deregulates the expression of COL4A2 and impairs ER-Golgi function
Paiva, Isabel; Jain, Garav; Lázaro, Diana F et al

in Neurobiology of Disease (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailPRESENCE: Monitoring and Modelling the Performance Metrics of Mobile Cloud SaaS Web Services
Ibrahim, Abdallah Ali Zainelabden Abdallah UL; Wasim, Muhammad Umer UL; Varrette, Sébastien UL et al

in J. Mobile Information Systems (2018), 2018(1351386),

Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are defining the quality of the services delivered from the Cloud Services Providers (CSPs) to the cloud customers. The services are delivered on a pay-per-use model. The ... [more ▼]

Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are defining the quality of the services delivered from the Cloud Services Providers (CSPs) to the cloud customers. The services are delivered on a pay-per-use model. The quality of the provided services is not guaranteed by the SLA because it is just a contract. The developments around mobile cloud computing and the advent of edge computing technologies are contributing to the diffusion of the cloud services and the multiplication of offers. Although the cloud services market is growing for the coming years, unfortunately, there is no standard mechanism which exists to verify and assure that delivered services satisfy the signed SLA agreement in an automatic way. The accurate monitoring and modelling of the provided Quality of Service (QoS) is also missing. In this context, we aim at offering an automatic framework named PRESENCE, to evaluate the QoS and SLA compliance of Web Services (WSs) offered across several CSPs. Yet unlike other approaches, PRESENCE aims at quantifying in a fair and by stealth way the performance and scalability of the delivered WS. This article focuses on the first experimental results obtained on the accurate modelisation of each individual performance metrics. Indeed, 19 generated models are provided, out of which 78.9% accurately represent the WS performance metrics for two representative SaaS web services used for the validation of the PRESENCE approach. This opens novel perspectives for assessing the SLA compliance of Cloud providers using the PRESENCE framework. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of pubic symphysis stiffness on pelvis stress distribution during single leg stance
Ricci, Pierre-Louis UL; Maas, Stefan UL; Gerich, Torsten et al

Poster (2018, July 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 UL)
See detailConceptualizing Tactics and Engagement in Amateur Media Practices: A Longue Durée Perspective
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 27)

This paper reflects on media tactics and engagement in amateur media practices from a longue durée perspective. More specifically, it addresses the question how discourses on and from users of different ... [more ▼]

This paper reflects on media tactics and engagement in amateur media practices from a longue durée perspective. More specifically, it addresses the question how discourses on and from users of different amateur and home movie technologies – from film via home video to digital media – reflect various forms of engagement, adaptation and resistance in amateur user practices. In the history of amateur filmmaking, a wide variety of users can be identified – from family filmmakers to cine-club hobbyists or even avant-garde artists. Differentiating not only between user types, but also between user generations, this paper argues, is helpful for understanding the user dynamics involved in so-called periods of transition, when the introduction of a new media technology brings about an (re)positioning of users vis-à-vis the new media technology’s affordances and constraints within its different contexts of use. Based on a historical discourse analysis of a wide variety of amateur photography, film and video magazines published between 1895 and 2005, the paper aims to provide both a conceptual and long-term historical reflection on this user dynamics involved in transitions of amateur media technologies and user practices. In total four periods of transition will be compared: the introduction of (1) small-gauge technologies in the 1920s and 1930s, (2) Super 8 film technologies in the 1960s, (3) home video technologies in the late 1970s and 1980s, and (4) digital media technologies in the 1990s and 2000s. Distinguishing between so-called ‘first-time users’, ‘adoptive users’ and ‘resistant users’ as together constituting a user generation in these four periods of transition, shows that while tactics and engagement involved in amateur media practices may take different forms throughout time, dependent on user types and contexts of use, actually various continuities (e.g. democratization discourses) and “historical hybridities” can be found in and between user generations of twentieth-century amateur media technologies. [less ▲]

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See detailEU as a Declining Normative Power and Turkey as a Declining Democracy: What does the Readmission Agreement tell us about a Global Approach to Migration and the Roles and Interactions of these Actors?
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Presentation (2018, June 21)

Readmission Agreement has been criticized by many parties not only because of the fact that EU did not want to take the refugees but also because most of the actors thought that Turkey is not capable of ... [more ▼]

Readmission Agreement has been criticized by many parties not only because of the fact that EU did not want to take the refugees but also because most of the actors thought that Turkey is not capable of handling the numbers while some others suggested that Turkey does not meet the bare minimum of democratic credentials to be able to look after the refugees, after all it is seen that Turkey is not treating its own citizens in with a just approach. In this paper, I would like to start with a brief background to what Turkey had done in order to comply with the EU Acquis till now and what the government’s weaknesses have been regarding this process. Why was the success of enactment of Act on Foreigners and International Protection shadowed by the open door policy towards the Syrian refugees and why did the state let many of the refugees pass to Greece although the officials were well aware that there might have been many deaths? The readmission agreement, on the other hand, was signed on 26th of March 2016 and it had many implications. It also had conditions as it was a typical carrot and stick policy of the EU, but it also led the relationship to become more interest based while the norms and ideas on solidarity and creativity have lost their significance. There is a great loss in terms of the normative power of the EU and there are great losses in terms of how democracy was used functionally by the Turkish government and this has manifested itself in the Readmission Agreement in the clearest way. After the background and perspectives from both sides, I suggest that it is a loss-loss game rather than a win-win situation, moreover, it is not the story of an empire that tells Turkey what to do or it is not the Turkish republic that follows the democratic path but it has become the clash of collapsing empires, an anachronistic way of dealing with a crisis. Finally, I will finish with policy suggestions to both sides of this dilemma as far as my theoretical background allows me. [less ▲]

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See detailL'entretien préliminaire individuel. Une chance négligée pour la résolution constructive du conflit par la médiation.
Mischo-Fleury, Sylvie Monique UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

Research on emotions and other psychic dimensions is now called upon to play an important role in preventing and resolving conflicts. Knowledge of psychological mechanisms, their normality and the ... [more ▼]

Research on emotions and other psychic dimensions is now called upon to play an important role in preventing and resolving conflicts. Knowledge of psychological mechanisms, their normality and the possibilities of intervening on their distortions in the conflict may contribute to offer answers to the mediator addressing these issues and enhanced skills to handle the face-to-face of a confrontational encounter. We have many years of experience in the treatment of psychopathologies, the regulation of mental dysfunctional mechanisms and their impact on social behaviors and cognitive processes triggered by emotions. During mediation session, if the actors of the litigation come to the negotiating table, it is precisely to address the crucial and highly emotional issues. Our practical experience of mediation, our partnerships with various mediation associations, the exchange with many field mediators, the research that we conducted, led us to think about practical solutions to the need for mediation based on psychology. We drew up a comprehensive review of the scientific literature and chose to set our questioning within the framework of action-research and mediation engineering and using the creative and participative methodology of design thinking. With a team of 7 mediators-users we have decoded, decrypted, the basic data of the psychic dimensions inherent to the conflict (perception, thought, emotion, will and values, behavior and communication). In our professional practice, we have built and experimented a structured matrix of analysis and intervention on the psychic dimensions in the conflict, the metamodel PRECAUCUS, to be used especially in pre-mediation, a restructured and fully integrated phase of the mediation process. An inductive qualitative analysis - in empirical research - enabled us to analyze the date collected during collaborative meetings as well as the benefits of using the first test of the metamodel. The results show the relevance of the solutions proposed both by the know-how and the "savoir-être" gained by the mediator and by the co-construction of the mediator/disputant work, as well as by the fact that psychology is, from now on, the most important fundamental discipline the when it comes to optimizing mediation process and contributing to the future of mediation. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailAutomatic discrimination of digits and letters in first graders and adults: an EEG Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation study.
Lochy, Aliette UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2018, June)

Both letters and digits are arbitrary visual shapes that are distinguished into categories only after cultural acquisition. The observation that digits are easier to identify than letters has been ... [more ▼]

Both letters and digits are arbitrary visual shapes that are distinguished into categories only after cultural acquisition. The observation that digits are easier to identify than letters has been repeatedly reported in the literature (Shubert, 2017). In the present study, we used a Fast Periodic Visual Stimulation approach with EEG recordings to assess the automatic discrimination of letters and digits from each other in 1st grade children (N=17) and in adults (N=18). Participants viewed 40 sec sequences (3 repetitions per condition) of frequent stimuli (letters or digits) at a fast periodic rate (adults: 10Hz, children: 6Hz), in which rare stimuli (the other category of alphanumeric symbols) were periodically inserted (every five items, e.g., adults: at 2Hz, children: at 1.2Hz). Results showed discrimination responses in both groups in posterior occipito-temporal regions with clear changes in lateralization patterns. In children, stimuli contained only single elements. Responses were right-lateralized for digits among letters, and revealed a trend for left-lateralization for letters among digits. In adults, when stimuli contained only 1 character, both letters and digits gave rise to responses in the RH. However, when strings of characters were presented, then letters were discriminated from digits in the LH. These findings show a developmental pattern where single elements in children seem to be processed like strings of elements in adults. [less ▲]

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See detailCortical networks in learning to read
Lochy, Aliette UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

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See detailEin trend spult die Zeit züruck. Die große Retro-Lust
van der Heijden, Tim UL; Panagl, Clemens

Article for general public (2018)

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See detailHybrid Histories: Technologies of Memory and the Cultural Dynamics of Home Movies, 1895-2005 (presentation)
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2018, May 25)

In this presentation, I will present my PhD dissertation on the cultural dynamics of home movies in the twentieth century. In my research, I have investigated how various generations have recorded their ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, I will present my PhD dissertation on the cultural dynamics of home movies in the twentieth century. In my research, I have investigated how various generations have recorded their memories on film, video and digital media, and, more specifically, how changes in these “technologies of memory” have shaped new forms of home movie making and screening. Covering the period from the invention of the film camera in the late nineteenth century, the introduction of 9.5mm, 16mm, 8mm small-gauges and Super 8 film technologies for amateurs, via home video to digital media technologies, this study addresses the complex interrelations between the materiality of film, video and digital media technologies, their social usages and cultural meanings from a long-term historical perspective. Focusing on specific periods of transition, it becomes clear that different media technologies, user practices and discourses not only succeed each other in time, but also increasingly interrelate, interact or even transform each other. Maintaining both a diachronic and a synchronic perspective on media transitions, I propose an alternative form of media historiography that rethinks media histories beyond the frameworks of change and continuity by perceiving hybridity as a constant factor in media historical development. [less ▲]

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See detailL'abolition de l'esclavage fête ses 130 ans au Brésil...
Santana, Dominique UL

Article for general public (2018)

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See detailRassismus an Diskriminatioun
Santana, Dominique UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

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See detailEen eeuw amateurfilm: van smalfilm tot selfie
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Ruim 100 jaar geleden begonnen de eerste amateurs zichzelf en hun omgeving vast te leggen in bewegend beeld. Tegenwoordig doet vrijwel iedereen dit met de smartphone, maar nog niet zo lang geleden ... [more ▼]

Ruim 100 jaar geleden begonnen de eerste amateurs zichzelf en hun omgeving vast te leggen in bewegend beeld. Tegenwoordig doet vrijwel iedereen dit met de smartphone, maar nog niet zo lang geleden behoorden het maken en vertonen van amateurfilms – ook wel ‘familiefilms’ of ‘home movies’ genoemd – enkel tot de welgestelde families en hobbyisten. Aan de hand van bijzonder archiefmateriaal en enkele sprekende fragmenten uit de fimcollectie van Het Utrechts Archief geeft mediahistoricus Tim van der Heijden in deze lezing inzicht in hoe het amateurfilmen in ruim een eeuw tijd is veranderd: van de eerste bewegende beelden vastgelegd op 9,5mm, 16mm en 8mm “smalfilm” tot aan de hedendaagse selfies. [less ▲]

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