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See detailModeling Security and Privacy Requirements for Mobile Applications: a Use Case-driven Approach
Mai, Xuan Phu UL; Göknil, Arda UL; Shar, Lwin Khin UL et al

Report (2017)

Defining and addressing security and privacy requirements in mobile apps is a significant challenge due to the high level of transparency regarding users' (private) information. In this paper, we propose ... [more ▼]

Defining and addressing security and privacy requirements in mobile apps is a significant challenge due to the high level of transparency regarding users' (private) information. In this paper, we propose, apply, and assess a modeling method that supports the specification of security and privacy requirements of mobile apps in a structured and analyzable form. Our motivation is that, in many contexts including mobile app development, use cases are common practice for the elicitation and analysis of functional requirements and should also be adapted for describing security requirements. We integrate and adapt an existing approach for modeling security and privacy requirements in terms of security threats, their mitigations, and their relations to use cases in a misuse case diagram. We introduce new security-related templates, i.e., a mitigation template and a misuse case template for specifying mitigation schemes and misuse case specifications in a structured and analyzable manner. Natural language processing can then be used to automatically detect and report inconsistencies among artifacts and between the templates and specifications. Since our approach supports stakeholders in precisely specifying and checking security threats, threat scenarios and their mitigations, it is expected to help with decision making and compliance with standards for improving security. We successfully applied our approach to industrial mobile apps and report lessons learned and results from structured interviews with engineers. [less ▲]

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See detailWir stehen an einem Scheideweg
Steffgen, Georges UL

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailTravail social en temps d'inclusion: Entre l'exclusion et inclusion. la responsabilité du travail social
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL

Presentation (2017, July 06)

Parmi les multiples notions ou perspectives à travers lesquelles les processus de recomposition des solidarités peuvent être appréhendées, celle de l’inclusion joue aujourd’hui (intensifié par CPDH, 2006 ... [more ▼]

Parmi les multiples notions ou perspectives à travers lesquelles les processus de recomposition des solidarités peuvent être appréhendées, celle de l’inclusion joue aujourd’hui (intensifié par CPDH, 2006) un rôle primordial, y compris dans les domaines du travail social. Selon Ebersold (2009), les discours sur l’inclusion tendent à reconfigurer la légitimité des institutions socio-éducatives et à réadapter leurs rôles et missions en faveur d’une société plus inclusive. Dans la perspective des droits de l'homme, l’inclusion est vue comme un outil ou un moyen approprié pour atteindre l’objectif de la création d’une société dite inclusive, où la non-discrimination, l’égalité des chances et la pleine et égale jouissance de tous les droits de l’homme et de toutes les libertés fondamentales par les personnes en situation de handicap vont de soi (Limbach-Reich, 2015; Gardeou, 2012). A côté du terme d’inclusion scolaire, le terme d’inclusion sociale n’était toutefois que d’un emploi rare dans le langage politique en Europe avant l’émergence de la Stratégie de Lisbonne (2000). Il a poursuivi sa progression triomphante dans le système économique du néolibéralisme et a été remplacé par celui d’inclusion active en insistant sur le principe «pas de droit sans devoir» (Euzéby, 2010). En travail social, la réception du discours sur l’inclusion et la participation sociale, en particulier dans le contexte du handicap, consiste souvent à déterminer les différences qui semblent exister entre intégration et inclusion (Plaisance, et al. 2007), mais n'aborde pas l'utilisation ambivalente de la terminologie et ne pose pas la question du pouvoir et du (manque de) solidarité (Becker, 2016). En ce qui concerne le Luxembourg, le discours de la CPDH entre de plus en plus en conflit avec une gouvernementalité (Foucault, 2004) basée sur le néolibéralisme, qui considère les personnes handicapées comme «capital humain» auquel il faut faire acquérir le habitus (Bourdieu, 1997) du «protean worker» (Lifton, 1993). Cette évolution tend à créer des inégalités dues aux mérites, qui sont considérées comme justes même en cas de personnes handicapées et en conséquences aliment l'exclusion sociale par le processus de gestion les difficultés comme problèmes individuelles à guérir par et en travail social (Hamzaoui, 2015). Dans la méritocratie néolibérale, l’intervention sociale est en plus en danger de devenir un organe de contrôle (cf. Staub-Bernasconi, 2007) sous le sceau de l’inclusion qui légitime l’exclusion des personnes perçues comme étant incapables de bénéficier d’une éducation «normale» et d’être compétitifs sur le marché du travail. L'objet de cette présentation est d’examiner les conséquences de la politique d’inclusion en faveur des personnes en situation de handicap. [less ▲]

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See detailRisk, safety and assistive technology in the context of ageing-in-place
Lamotte, Mathilde UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Tournier, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 06)

When speaking about ageing in place, risk of accidents and subsequent injuries is an important part of individual worries, and risk avoidance or risk minimisation are main concerns of older people and ... [more ▼]

When speaking about ageing in place, risk of accidents and subsequent injuries is an important part of individual worries, and risk avoidance or risk minimisation are main concerns of older people and their caregivers. Findings show that older people are more at risk of unintended injuries than younger people (i.e. falls, foodborne diseases). Moreover, individual concerns and associated worries to avoid specific risks may even lead to the decision to move to an institution. In this context it is important to consider that being “as safe as possible” with respect to objective parameters does not necessarily indicate the subjective feeling of being safe. The feeling of safety and the objective degree of safety are not linearly related in a way that increasing one factor will increase the other and conversely. Furthermore, some factors that can contribute to objectively enhance safety may even lead to greater feeling of unsafety. Our review aims to investigate the relationship between objective and subjective safety in the context of ageing in place as well as the underlying mechanisms that help to explain the different links between objective and subjective safety. A further goal is offer a heuristic model presenting factors that may help to enhance older people’s consciousness of safety and thus quality of life. These include individual as well as social and macro-social factors. This paper focusses individual factors and will especially highlight the role of older people’s daily routines and their impact on technology acceptance. [less ▲]

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See detailThis Country Has the Real Apprentice: Germany’s approach to worker training allows people to enjoy a middle-class lifestyle.
Schuetze, Christopher F.; Powell, Justin J W UL; Fortwengel, Johann

Diverse speeches and writings (2017)

WUPPERTAL, Germany — Edgar Wingert, a 39-year-old-year material specialist, had always wanted a career in the German military. But when, after nearly a year in the service, his relatively poor eyesight ... [more ▼]

WUPPERTAL, Germany — Edgar Wingert, a 39-year-old-year material specialist, had always wanted a career in the German military. But when, after nearly a year in the service, his relatively poor eyesight forced him to abandon his dream career, he went to work as an untrained worker in the local paper mill. After the financial crisis hit and he was laid off, Wingert thought for the first time about doing his "Ausbildung," the German name for the professional training approach that involves both theoretical learning and on-the-job training – an apprenticeship. Passing both would get him his journeyman's letter, the technical qualification that allows millions of Germans without a university degree to do challenging and rewarding work, earn a good income and know that they can easily find new work, if they are laid off or otherwise want to leave their employers. "By the time I started thinking about doing an apprenticeship, I was 30 and it was too late," he says, taking a break from cleaning the laser printing nozzle used to inscribe the name of the German manufacturer Knipex onto the insulating grip on hundreds of pliers stacked neatly in boxes by his side. Germany, which is currently enjoying its lowest unemployment rate in 37 years, is well known for a system of standardized, superior training qualifications, which allow primarily young people to train and get recognized for specific jobs. In Germany, everything from selling cars to building pianos and harpsichords has its own practical technical schooling, testing and qualifications. It is a system that experts say allows a highly capable workforce to earn middle-class wages, enjoy job security and bring a high level of expertise to jobs that increasingly rely on more than just muscle, nimble fingers and endurance. "The key to the success of the German model is interlocking of practical training and theoretical learning," says professor Justin J.W. Powell at the University of Luxembourg, who has studied apprenticeship systems both in German and the United States. Worker training will surely be discussed at the July 7-8 summit of Group of 20 leading rich and developing nations, which will be held in the northern German port city of Hamburg. Much of the media attention will focus on Trump's meeting with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, and on climate change, where the American leader has departed from allies by announcing his country's withdrawal from the Paris climate accords. But economic issues such as trade remain the heart of the G20's work, and worker training is a major issue for wealthy nations, whose aging populations continue to grapple with rapidly changing economic currents. Training is a hot topic in many countries. In the United States, for example, debate is intensifying over how best to create jobs for adults lacking a four-year college degree. Despite U.S. President Donald Trump's criticism of Germany and its trade practices, he announced a boosting of the apprenticeship programs that many experts say is an attempt to emulate Germany's success in closing the so-called skills gap – the gulf between companies' need for a high-trained workforce and the job seekers who are not adequately trained for the jobs on offer. "For decades, Germany has been a model for highly successful apprenticeship – that's a name I like, apprentice – apprenticeship programs," Trump reportedly said during a roundtable discussion with the chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel. Wingert's big chance to do a formal apprenticeship came in 2012, when Knipex, the company he still works for, offered him and some of his colleagues the chance to get trained. He would be excused from the factory floor for a week each month to pursue a yearlong course that, after a series of two written tests and one practical test, would earn him the official title of machine and systems operator. That professional qualification allows him to apply to higher-paying jobs in the factory, but also lets him more easily enter other manufacturing businesses at a higher pay. The cost of the tuition at the trade college and the 12 weeks of missed work are payed by the federal employment office under a program designed to train older adults. In 2015 the program helped train more than 24,000 people in Germany all over at a cost of roughly 180 million euros, or about $206 million. "You should see what it means for people to get the letter of acceptance," says Sandra Urspruch, a member of the company's human resources department. "It's like getting the golden ticket." At Knipex less than 40 percent of those working on the factory floor have professional qualifications. The balance, who are untrained, execute relatively straightforward tasks on pre-set machines and pre-determined routines; they are more likely to be let go if orders decrease. A fairly typical story of German prowess in small and mid-sized manufacturing companies, Knipex was founded in the second half of the 19th century, well after the industrial revolution had reached the German Ruhr-area, still the heartland of the biggest manufacturing economy in Europe. The Knipex factory, a sprawling series of buildings and halls that now employs about 800 workers who make about 45,000 pliers a day, stands on the site of the original factory, where the founder, who was the current director's great grandfather, was making about 120 pliers a day. Despite its history, the plier factory is aggressively modern. Robots now handle some of the heavy industrial forges. Most of the factory halls are lit with natural light. Small glass-enclosed cabinets ensure that smokers do not affect the indoor-air quality. One section of one floor – where the tools are neatly sorted and the machines look especially modern – is dedicated entirely to training the young who will spend up to three years getting professional qualifications. Knipex was also fairly forward-thinking in starting the program that allows older adults, like Wingert, to go through professional training. While the company itself does not carry any of the cost, it does have to reorganize schedules and in some cases hire extra workers to fill-in for the time Wingert and his peers miss on the factory floor. Besides, now trained and certified, nothing stops them from going up the road to look for better employment opportunities. For the company such inconvenience is paid off by the loyalty it brings, explains Urspruch. Besides, at a time when many workers are retiring and when the jobs become technically more complex, the measure guarantees the manufacturer a steady supply of well-trained employees. For the government-run national employment agency, footing the bill is a way to make sure unemployment numbers stay low. "Employees without a professional qualification or diploma are usually more vulnerable to unemployment, or in cases where they don't have jobs, have a harder time finding employment," says Paul Ebsen, a spokesperson for the German national employment agency. "That's why the employment agency puts so much stake in professional qualifications." Johann Fortwengel, who has extensively studied German firms who come to America looking for locally trained professional manufacturing technicians to hire – or failing that try to help develop an apprentice system to help train workers – says many Americans don't understand the German concept of apprenticeships. For one, many Americans don't realize that the vast majority of Germans who enter into the system are under 20. "In the States, most people who enter apprenticeships seem to be in the 20s, or even early 30s," says Fortwengel, a lecturer in International Management at Kings College in London. There's also a stigma attached to apprenticeship and technical colleges that is less pronounced in Germany, adds Fortwengel. "Everyone wants to do a bachelor's degree," he says of American culture. But according to experts, the core difference between Germany and the U.S. is how many people and businesses rely on the national apprenticeship system. In the U.S., where the Department of Labor promotes "ApprenticeshipUSA," many – if not most – manufacturing companies still tend to train and evaluate workers themselves, a practice that can leave workers with the kind of narrow training that makes changing jobs difficult. "The German system is so special because it is so standardized," says Fortwengel. According to the University of Luxembourg's Powell, the German system also differs from the American one because of the stakeholders involved: "What makes the system so unique is corporatism; the tripartite of unions, government and companies." Such a structure is one of the reasons that Fortwengel doesn't believe the German system can be easily transplanted into America. "Even in a hundred years, it won't be like the German system," he says. More likely, it will be a training system with a distinctly American flavor." [less ▲]

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See detailThe Quest for Questions in Digital History: A Comparative View on Werner- and Delors Report on Economic and Monetary Union
Armaselu, Florentina UL; Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 05)

Starting from Gaston Bachelard’s assumption that “all knowledge is an answer to a question”, the study proposes the use of comparative textual analysis to formulate research questions. A set of questions ... [more ▼]

Starting from Gaston Bachelard’s assumption that “all knowledge is an answer to a question”, the study proposes the use of comparative textual analysis to formulate research questions. A set of questions were derived via the TXM, Textométrie software, a tool for lexicometry and statistical analysis. Two historical documents on the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) were examined, the Werner report and the Delors report (French versions). The “quest for questions” was based on the comparison of the documents, using the TXM specificities feature that highlights what properties are specific, as overuse or deficit, to a part versus the rest of a corpus. The documents were analysed both as entire units and as fragments (numbered parts and sections). The specificities were computed for the noun-adjective combination and parts of speech, the properties with specificity scores higher and lower than the TXM default positive and negative banality thresholds being selected for further enquiry and subsequently used to formulate research questions. Although further experiments, testing with other corpora and theoretical formalisation are required, the first results show that digital tools may serve not only as hypotheses or conclusions validators but also as means of discovering exploration paths to support interpretation and the construction of new knowledge in digital history. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Scientific Applications of IGS Products: An Assessment of the Reprocessed TIGA Solutions and Combined Products
Hunegnaw, Addisu UL; Teferle, Felix Norman UL; Abraha, Kibrom Ebuy UL et al

Scientific Conference (2017, July 03)

Global sea levels have risen since the early 19th century and this rise is likely to accelerate through the 21st century and beyond. Much of the past information on sea level rise stems from the ... [more ▼]

Global sea levels have risen since the early 19th century and this rise is likely to accelerate through the 21st century and beyond. Much of the past information on sea level rise stems from the instrumental records of tide gauges, which measure changes in sea level relative to a tide gauge benchmark (TGBM) situated on land. In order to assess regional or global sea level changes the vertical land movements (VLM) at the tide gauge and its TGBM need to be monitored. GNSS, in particular GPS, has been recognized as one space-geodetic technique to provide highly accurate estimates of VLM in a geocentric reference frame for tide gauges and their TGBMs. As it turned out, this scientific application of GNSS poses the most stringent requirements on the consistency and homogeneity on the data, processing strategies, satellite products, bias models and reference frames used in the analysis of GNSS measurements. Under the umbrella of the International GNSS Service (IGS), the Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring (TIGA) Working Group (WG) has the objective to provide highly-accurate positions and VLM estimates for a global network of tide gauges contributing to the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS) and the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). As such TIGA forms an important contribution of the IGS to the goals of the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). To achieve the TIGA-WG objectives, five TIGA Analysis Centers (TACs) contributed re-processed global GPS network solutions to TIGA, employing the latest bias models and processing strategies in accordance with the second IGS re-processing campaign (repro2). These individual TAC solutions were then used to compute the combined products by the TIGA Combination Centre (TCC) at the University of Luxembourg using an in-house modified version of the CATREF software package. In this study, we present and internally evaluate the individual TAC and TIGA combined products. We investigate station positions, scale and origin biases, including their frequency content. We also externally evaluate the combined products, particularly the VLM estimates, using solutions from the ITRF2008, ITRF2014 and the glacial isostatic adjustment model ICE-6G (VM5a). Finally, we draw some conclusions on the recent advances and remaining limitations of the various IGS products required for the challenging application to sea level studies. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetic neutron scattering on Nd-Fe-B magnets
Michels, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 02)

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See detailSpatial PAPR Reduction in Symbol-level Precoding for the Multi-beam Satellite Downlink
Spano, Danilo UL; Alodeh, Maha UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in IEEE SPAWC 2017 (2017, July)

In this work, a novel symbol-level precoding scheme is proposed, for managing the multi-user interference in the forward downlink channel of a multi-beam satellite system. Besides exploiting the ... [more ▼]

In this work, a novel symbol-level precoding scheme is proposed, for managing the multi-user interference in the forward downlink channel of a multi-beam satellite system. Besides exploiting the constructive interference effect, the proposed scheme aims at improving the robustness of the transmitted signals to the non-linear distortions of practical satellite systems. This is done by reducing the imbalances between the instantaneous power transmitted by the multiple antennas, which are detrimental in non-linear systems. More specifically, this work proposes a symbol-level precoding scheme performing the minimization of the spatial peak-to-average power ratio, under Quality-of-Service constraints. An iterative algorithm is proposed to solve the related optimization problem. Numerical results are presented to assess the performance of the proposed scheme, which outperforms the state of the art symbol-level precoding techniques in terms of spatial peak-to-average power ratio across the transmitting antennas. [less ▲]

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See detailAttentional processing of itch
van Laarhoven, Antoinette; van Damme, Stefaan; Lavrijsen et al

in Psychological Research (2017)

Itch is a prevalent somatosensory symptom thatcan be highly disabling , because it is likely to drawattention and, as a resu lt, may interfere with the perfor-mance of daily activities. Yet, research ... [more ▼]

Itch is a prevalent somatosensory symptom thatcan be highly disabling , because it is likely to drawattention and, as a resu lt, may interfere with the perfor-mance of daily activities. Yet, research experimentallyinvestigating attention to itch is lacking. In this study weaimed to investigate attentional processing of itch usingmultiple behavioral attention tasks. Forty-one healthyparticipants performed (1) a modified Stroop task with itch-related words, (2) a dot-probe task with itch-related pic-tures, and (3) a rece ntly developed somatosensory attentiontask in which the effect of experimentally induced itch onthe localization of visual targets was examined. Addition-ally, a number of self-report questionnaires related tosomatosensory attentional processing were administered.Results indicated that participants’ attention was biasedtoward itch-related words and pictures assessed by meansof the dot- probe and modified Stroop task, respectively. Forthe somatosensory attention task, results showed that itchdid not significantly influence the allocation of attention.However, when taking into account the time course ofattention during the itch stimulus, data suggested thatparticipants tended to disengage attention away during theitch stimulus. This is the first study that indicates anattentional bias for itch, using methods that have previouslybeen validated for other sensations such as pain. In addi-tion, the newly developed somatosensory attention taskmay reflect the time course of attention toward a tonic itchstimulus. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interference of pain with task performance: Increasing ecological validity in research
van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL

in Scandinavian Journal of Pain (2017), 16

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See detailProceedings of International Conference on Software and Systems Process (ICSSP)
Kuhrmann, Marco; Diebold, Philipp; Münch, Jürgen et al

in Hybrid software and system development in practice: Waterfall, scrum, and beyond (2017, July)

Software and system development faces numerous challenges of rapidly changing markets. To address such challenges, companies and projects design and adopt specific development approaches by combining well ... [more ▼]

Software and system development faces numerous challenges of rapidly changing markets. To address such challenges, companies and projects design and adopt specific development approaches by combining well-structured comprehensive methods and flexible agile practices. Yet, the number of methods and practices is large, and available studies argue that the actual process composition is carried out in a fairly ad-hoc manner. The present paper reports on a survey on hybrid software development approaches. We study which approaches are used in practice, how different approaches are combined, and what contextual factors influence the use and combination of hybrid software development approaches. Our results from 69 study participants show a variety of development approaches used and combined in practice. We show that most combinations follow a pattern in which a traditional process model serves as framework in which several fine-grained (agile) practices are plugged in. We further show that hybrid software development approaches are independent from the company size and external triggers. We conclude that such approaches are the results of a natural process evolution, which is mainly driven by experience, learning, and pragmatism. [less ▲]

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See detailProbability signatures of multistate systems made up of two-state components
Marichal, Jean-Luc UL; Mathonet, Pierre; Jorge, Navarro et al

in Proc. 10th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Reliability (MMR 2017) (2017, July)

The structure signature of a system made up of $n$ components having continuous and i.i.d. lifetimes was defined in the eighties by Samaniego as the $n$-tuple whose $k$-th coordinate is the probability ... [more ▼]

The structure signature of a system made up of $n$ components having continuous and i.i.d. lifetimes was defined in the eighties by Samaniego as the $n$-tuple whose $k$-th coordinate is the probability that the $k$-th component failure causes the system to fail. More recently, a bivariate version of this concept was considered as follows. The joint structure signature of a pair of systems built on a common set of components having continuous and i.i.d. lifetimes is a square matrix of order $n$ whose $(k,l)$-entry is the probability that the $k$-th failure causes the first system to fail and the $l$-th failure causes the second system to fail. This concept was successfully used to derive a signature-based decomposition of the joint reliability of the two systems. In this talk we will show an explicit formula to compute the joint structure signature of two or more systems and extend this formula to the general non-i.i.d. case, assuming only that the distribution of the component lifetimes has no ties. Then we will discuss a condition on this distribution for the joint reliability of the systems to have a signature-based decomposition. Finally we will show how these results can be applied to the investigation of the reliability and signature of multistate systems made up of two-state components. [less ▲]

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See detailHerausforderung partizipative Stadtplanung
Hesse, Markus UL

Article for general public (2017)

Als Hauptstadt übernimmt Luxemburg zahlreiche Funktionen an Stelle des Staates. Als Wohnort ist sie den quartierspezifischen Interessen ausgesetzt. Die sich daraus ergebende Spannung fordert nicht nur ... [more ▼]

Als Hauptstadt übernimmt Luxemburg zahlreiche Funktionen an Stelle des Staates. Als Wohnort ist sie den quartierspezifischen Interessen ausgesetzt. Die sich daraus ergebende Spannung fordert nicht nur Politik und Verwaltung heraus. Überlegungen zu den Bedingungen gelingender Partizipation von Bürgerschaft und Forschung. [less ▲]

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See detailFALCON: A Toolbox for the Fast Contextualisation of Logical Networks.
De Landtsheer, Sebastien; Trairatphisan, Panuwat; Lucarelli, Philippe UL et al

in Bioinformatics (Oxford, England) (2017)

Motivation: Mathematical modelling of regulatory networks allows for the discovery of knowledge at the system level. However, existing modelling tools are often computation-heavy and do not offer ... [more ▼]

Motivation: Mathematical modelling of regulatory networks allows for the discovery of knowledge at the system level. However, existing modelling tools are often computation-heavy and do not offer intuitive ways to explore the model, to test hypotheses or to interpret the results biologically. Results: We have developed a computational approach to contextualise logical models of regulatory networks with biological measurements based on a probabilistic description of rule-based interactions between the different molecules. Here, we propose a Matlab toolbox, FALCON, to automatically and efficiently build and contextualise networks, which includes a pipeline for conducting parameter analysis, knockouts, and easy and fast model investigation. The contextualised models could then provide qualitative and quantitative information about the network and suggest hypotheses about biological processes. Availability and implementation: FALCON is freely available for non-commercial users on GitHub under the GPLv3 licence. The toolbox, installation instructions, full documentation and test datasets are available at https://github.com/sysbiolux/FALCON . FALCON runs under Matlab (MathWorks) and requires the Optimization Toolbox. Contact: thomas.sauter@uni.lu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. [less ▲]

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See detailPower Allocation for In-Band Full-Duplex Self-Backhauling
Lagunas, Eva UL; Lei, Lei UL; Maleki, Sina UL et al

in International Conference on Telecommunications and Signal Processing (TSP), Barcelona, Spain, July 2017 (2017, July)

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See detailEnergy-Efficient Design for Edge-caching Wireless Networks: When is Coded-caching beneficial?
Vu, Thang Xuan UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL; Ottersten, Björn UL

in Abstract book of IEEE 18th International Workshop on Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Communications (SPAWC) (2017, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (9 UL)