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See detailMany Independent Objective (MIO) Algorithm for Test Suite Generation
Arcuri, Andrea UL

in Symposium on Search-Based Software Engineering (SSBSE) (in press)

Automatically generating test suites is intrinsically a multi- objective problem, as any of the testing targets (e.g, statements to exe- cute or mutants to kill) is an objective on its own. Test suite ... [more ▼]

Automatically generating test suites is intrinsically a multi- objective problem, as any of the testing targets (e.g, statements to exe- cute or mutants to kill) is an objective on its own. Test suite generation has peculiarities that are quite di erent from other more regular optimi- sation problems. For example, given an existing test suite, one can add more tests to cover the remaining objectives. One would like the smallest number of small tests to cover as many objectives as possible, but that is a secondary goal compared to covering those targets in the rst place. Furthermore, the amount of objectives in software testing can quickly become unmanageable, in the order of (tens/hundreds of) thousands, es- pecially for system testing of industrial size systems. Traditional multi- objective optimisation algorithms can already start to struggle with just four or ve objectives to optimize. To overcome these issues, di erent techniques have been proposed, like for example the Whole Test Suite (WTS) approach and the Many-Objective Sorting Algorithm (MOSA). However, those techniques might not scale well to very large numbers of objectives and limited search budgets (a typical case in system test- ing). In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm, called Many Indepen- dent Objective (MIO) algorithm. This algorithm is designed and tailored based on the speci c properties of test suite generation. An empirical study, on a set of arti cial and actual software, shows that the MIO al- gorithm can achieve higher coverage compared to WTS and MOSA, as it can better exploit the peculiarities of test suite generation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (8 UL)
See detail'Was heißt schon Integration?' Subjektive Vorstellungen von Migrantenjugendlichen in Luxemburg
Steinmetz, Sara UL; Willems, Helmut UL; Weiss, Pierre UL

in Henn, Daniela; Prigge, Jessica; Ries, Karsten (Eds.) et al Streifzüge durch die angewandte Sozialwissenschaft. Evaluation - Migration - Sozialpolitik - Soziale Arbeit. Dieter Filsinger zum 65. Geburtstag (in press)

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See detailAn Empirical Evaluation of Evolutionary Algorithms for Test Suite Generation
Campos, Jose; Ge, Yan; Fraser, Gordon et al

in Symposium on Search-Based Software Engineering (SSBSE) (in press)

Evolutionary algorithms have been shown to be effective at generating unit test suites optimised for code coverage. While many aspects of these algorithms have been evaluated in detail (e.g., test length ... [more ▼]

Evolutionary algorithms have been shown to be effective at generating unit test suites optimised for code coverage. While many aspects of these algorithms have been evaluated in detail (e.g., test length and different kinds of techniques aimed at improving performance, like seeding), the influence of the specific algorithms has to date seen less attention in the literature. As it is theoretically impossible to design an algorithm that is best on all possible problems, a common approach in software engineering problems is to first try a Genetic Algorithm, and only afterwards try to refine it or compare it with other algorithms to see if any of them is more suited for the addressed problem. This is particularly important in test generation, since recent work suggests that random search may in practice be equally effective, whereas the reformulation as a many-objective problem seems to be more effective. To shed light on the influence of the search algorithms, we empirically evaluate six different algorithms on a selection of non-trivial open source classes. Our study shows that the use of a test archive makes evolutionary algorithms clearly better than random testing, and it confirms that the many-objective search is the most effective. [less ▲]

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See detailRESTful API Automated Test Case Generation
Arcuri, Andrea UL

in IEEE International Conference on Software Quality, Reliability & Security (QRS) (in press)

Nowadays, web services play a major role in the development of enterprise applications. Many such applications are now developed using a service-oriented architecture (SOA), where microservices is one of ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, web services play a major role in the development of enterprise applications. Many such applications are now developed using a service-oriented architecture (SOA), where microservices is one of its most popular kind. A RESTful web service will provide data via an API over the network using HTTP, possibly interacting with databases and other web services. Testing a RESTful API poses challenges, as inputs/outputs are sequences of HTTP requests/responses to a remote server. Many approaches in the literature do black-box testing, as the tested API is a remote service whose code is not available. In this paper, we consider testing from the point of view of the developers, which do have full access to the code that they are writing. Therefore, we propose a fully automated white-box testing approach, where test cases are automatically generated using an evolutionary algorithm. Tests are rewarded based on code coverage and fault finding metrics. We implemented our technique in a tool called EVOMASTER, which is open-source. Experiments on two open-source, yet non-trivial RESTful services and an industrial one, do show that our novel technique did automatically find 38 real bugs in those applications. However, obtained code coverage is lower than the one achieved by the manually written test suites already existing in those services. Research directions on how to further improve such approach are therefore discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSecurity Slicing for Auditing Common Injection Vulnerabilities
Thome, Julian UL; Shar, Lwin Khin UL; Bianculli, Domenico UL et al

in The Journal of Systems & Software (in press)

Cross-site scripting and injection vulnerabilities are among the most common and serious security issues for Web applications. Although existing static analysis approaches can detect potential ... [more ▼]

Cross-site scripting and injection vulnerabilities are among the most common and serious security issues for Web applications. Although existing static analysis approaches can detect potential vulnerabilities in source code, they generate many false warnings and source-sink traces with irrelevant information, making their adoption impractical for security auditing. One suitable approach to support security auditing is to compute a program slice for each sink, which contains all the information required for security auditing. However, such slices are likely to contain a large amount of information that is irrelevant to security, thus raising scalability issues for security audits. In this paper, we propose an approach to assist security auditors by defining and experimenting with pruning techniques to reduce original program slices to what we refer to as security slices, which contain sound and precise information. To evaluate the proposed approach, we compared our security slices to the slices generated by a state-of-the-art program slicing tool, based on a number of open-source benchmarks. On average, our security slices are 76% smaller than the original slices. More importantly, with security slicing, one needs to audit approximately 1% of the total code to fix all the vulnerabilities, thus suggesting significant reduction in auditing costs. [less ▲]

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See detailArea exploration with a swarm of UAVs combining deterministic Chaotic Ant Colony Mobility with position MPC
Rosalie, Martin UL; Dentler, Jan Eric UL; Danoy, Grégoire UL et al

in 2017 International Conference on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (ICUAS) (in press)

The recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) technology permit to develop new usages for them. One of the current challenges is to operate UAVs as an autonomous swarm. In this domain we already ... [more ▼]

The recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) technology permit to develop new usages for them. One of the current challenges is to operate UAVs as an autonomous swarm. In this domain we already proposed a new mobility model using Ant Colony Algorithms combined with chaotic dynamics (CACOC) to enhance the coverage of an area by a swarm of UAVs. In this paper we propose to consider this mobility model as waypoints for real UAVs. A control model of the UAVs is deployed to test the efficiency of the coverage of an area by the swarm. We have tested our approach in a realistic robotics simulator (V-Rep) which is connected with ROS. We compare the performance in terms of coverage using several metrics to ensure that this mobility model is efficient for real UAVs. [less ▲]

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See detailAbsence of regulator of G-protein signaling 4 does not protect against dopamine neuron dysfunction and injury in the mouse 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinson's disease
Ashrafi, Amer UL; Garcia, Pierre UL; Kollmus, Heike et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (in press)

Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 4 (RGS4), a member of the RGS family of proteins that inactivate G-proteins, has gained interest as a potential drug target for neurological disorders, such as epilepsy ... [more ▼]

Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 4 (RGS4), a member of the RGS family of proteins that inactivate G-proteins, has gained interest as a potential drug target for neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the case of PD, the main current option for alleviating motor symptoms are dopamine replacement therapies, which have limitations because of side effects, and reduced effectiveness over the long term. Research on new non-dopaminergic PD drug targets has indicated that inhibition of RGS4 could be an effective adjuvant treatment option. The effectiveness of RGS4 inhibition for an array of PD-linked functional and structural neuroprotection endpoints has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we use the 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioning model of the nigrostriatal pathway in mice to address this question. We observe, using a battery of behavioral and pathological measures, that mice deficient for RGS4 are not protected from 6-OHDA induced injury, and show enhanced susceptibility in some measures of motor function. Our results suggest that inhibition of RGS4 as a non-dopaminergic target for PD should be approached with caution. [less ▲]

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See detailAugmenting Field Data for Testing Systems Subject to Incremental Requirements Changes
Di Nardo, Daniel; Pastore, Fabrizio; Briand, Lionel UL

in ACM Transactions on Software Engineering & Methodology (in press)

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See detailHow Do Different Aspects of Spatial Skills Relate to Early Arithmetic and Number Line Estimation?
Cornu, Véronique UL; Hornung, Caroline; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in Journal of Numerical Cognition (in press)

The present study investigated the predictive role of spatial skills for arithmetic and number line estimation in kindergarten children (N = 125). Spatial skills are known to be related to mathematical ... [more ▼]

The present study investigated the predictive role of spatial skills for arithmetic and number line estimation in kindergarten children (N = 125). Spatial skills are known to be related to mathematical development, but due to the construct’s non-unitary nature, different aspects of spatial skills need to be differentiated. In the present study, a spatial orientation task, a spatial visualization task and visuo-motor integration task were administered to assess three different aspects of spatial skills. Furthermore, we assessed counting abilities, knowledge of Arabic numerals, quantitative knowledge, as well as verbal working memory and verbal intelligence in kindergarten. Four months later, the same children performed an arithmetic and a number line estimation task to evaluate how the abilities measured at time 1 predicted early mathematics outcomes. Hierarchical regression modelling revealed that children’s performance in arithmetic was predicted by their performance in the spatial orientation and Visuo-motor integration task, as well as their knowledge of the Arabic numerals. Performance in number line estimation was significantly predicted by the children’s spatial orientation performance. Our findings emphasize the role of spatial skills, notably spatial orientation, in mathematical development. The relation between spatial orientation and arithmetic was partially mediated by the number line estimation task. Our results further show that some aspects of spatial skills might be more predictive of mathematical development than others, underlining the importance to differentiate within the construct of spatial skills when it comes to understanding numerical development. [less ▲]

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See detailA multifactorial and integrative approach to impulsivity in neuropsychology: Insights from the UPPS model of impulsivity
Rochat, Lucien; Billieux, Joël UL; Gagnon, Jean et al

in Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (in press)

Risky and excessive behaviors, such as aggressive and compulsive behaviors, are frequently described in patients with brain damage and have dramatic psychosocial consequences. Although there is strong ... [more ▼]

Risky and excessive behaviors, such as aggressive and compulsive behaviors, are frequently described in patients with brain damage and have dramatic psychosocial consequences. Although there is strong evidence that impulsivity constitutes a key factor at play in these behaviors, the literature about impulsivity in neuropsychology is to date scarce. In addition, examining and understanding these problematic behaviors requires the assumption that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct. Consequently, this article aims at shedding light on frequent risky and excessive behaviors in patients with brain damage by focusing on a unified, comprehensive, and well-validated model, namely, the UPPS model of impulsivity (Whiteside & Lynam, 2001). This model considers impulsivity as a multidimensional construct that includes four facets: urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking. Furthermore, we discuss the psychological mechanisms underlying the dimensions of impulsivity, as well as the laboratory tasks designed to assess each mechanism and their neural bases. We then present a scale specifically designed to assess these four dimensions of impulsivity in patients with brain damage and examine the data regarding this multidimensional approach to impulsivity in neuropsychology. This review supports the need to adopt a multifactorial and integrative approach toward impulsive behaviors, and the model presented provides a valuable rationale to disentangle the nature of brain systems and mechanisms underlying impulsive behaviors in patients with brain damage. It may also foster further relevant research in the field of impulsivity and improve assessment and rehabilitation of impulsive behaviors in clinical settings. [less ▲]

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See detailSuburbanisierung
Hesse, Markus UL

in Handwörterbuch der Stadt- und Raumentwicklung (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 UL)
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See detailEmotional ambivalence in adult children of care-dependent older parents: Heuristic impulses from cognitive-motivational emotion theories
Boll, Thomas UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan (Eds.) Cultural psychology of transgenerational family relations: Investigating ambivalences (in press)

Emotional ambivalence of adult children of care-dependent older parents is analyzed from the perspective of cognitive-motivational theories of emotion. Emotional ambivalence is conceived of as the co ... [more ▼]

Emotional ambivalence of adult children of care-dependent older parents is analyzed from the perspective of cognitive-motivational theories of emotion. Emotional ambivalence is conceived of as the co-presence of positive and negative emotions toward the multifaceted care situation involving these major elements: Multiple problems of the elderly parent, multiple caregiving tasks of the adult child, and multiple gains and losses for the elderly parent and for the adult child. In line with cognitive-motivational theories, positive and negative emotions are thought of as arising from mental comparisons between what adult children desire and what they believe with respect to the various facets of the care situation. Perceived fulfillment of such desires is assumed to lead to positive emotions (happiness, hope, moral pride, etc.) and perceived frustration to result in negative emotions (pity, fear, guilt, etc.) related to the elderly parent, oneself, or other family members. Because adult children usually have multiple desires (e.g., own welfare, welfare of older parent, welfare of other family members) which may be perceived as fulfilled in some areas and unfulfilled in others, various combinations of positive and negative emotions and thus emotional ambivalence is assumed to arise toward various aspects of the care situation. An illustrative application of this theoretical approach is given to a major care-related event, namely, the transition of an elderly parent to a nursing home. In conclusion, benefits for research and practice in the field of elder care (measurement, description, understanding, management, and positive functions of emotional ambivalence) are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detail(Re)shaping Educational Research through ‘Programification’: Institutional Expansion, Change, and Translation in Norway
Zapp, Mike UL; Helgetun, Jo B.; Powell, Justin J W UL

in European Journal of Education (in press), 52

Educational research in Norway has experienced unprecedented structural expansion as well as cognitive shifts over the past two decades, especially due to increased state investments and the strategic use ... [more ▼]

Educational research in Norway has experienced unprecedented structural expansion as well as cognitive shifts over the past two decades, especially due to increased state investments and the strategic use of extensive and multi-year thematic programs to fund research projects. Applying a neo-institutionalist framework, we examine institutionalization dynamics in cultural-cognitive, normative, and regulative dimensions over the past two decades using interviews, research program calls, policy documents, and funding data. In the cultural-cognitive dimension, we find references to the knowledge society, the importance of evidence in policy-making, and ideas of quality, excellence, and relevance. In the normative dimension, we find the introduction of new professional and methodological standards, reflecting broader global patterns of academic and epistemic drift. In the regulative dimension, the strengthened role of both government and the Research Council of Norway is manifest in substantial growth in both funding and large-scale, long-term planning, including thematic choices—evidence of ‘programification’. The importance of external models has grown in an era of internationalization, yet translation occurs at every level of governance of educational research. This results in a specific Norwegian research model, guided by a mode of governance of programs, that maintains social values traditionally strong in Nordic societies. [less ▲]

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See detailA Stein deficit for the logarithmic Sobolev inequality
Ledoux, Michel; Nourdin, Ivan UL; Peccati, Giovanni UL

in Science China Mathematics (in press)

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See detailHigher Education Systems and Institutions, Luxembourg
Harmsen, Robert UL; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Shin, J.C.; Teixeira, P. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of International Higher Education Systems and Institutions (in press)

Bordered by Belgium, France, and Germany, Luxembourg is one of the three main seats of the European Union’s institutions. The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg sits at the crossroads between Europe’s Germanic and ... [more ▼]

Bordered by Belgium, France, and Germany, Luxembourg is one of the three main seats of the European Union’s institutions. The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg sits at the crossroads between Europe’s Germanic and Francophone language communities. The country has experienced remarkable migratory flows, resulting in an ethnically hyper-diverse and multilingual population. Reflecting this cultural diversity, the educational system at all levels emphasizes language learning. Historically an agrarian society, a century ago it developed a very strong steelmaking industry and over the past decades has witnessed extraordinary growth in its financial services sector. Established to broaden the economic bases of the country, thus reducing overreliance on the steel and banking industries, yet against considerable pecuniary and ideological resistance, the national flagship University of Luxembourg (UL) was founded in 2003 upon initiative of a small group of elite decisionmakers. As a private, government-dependent institution (établissement public) directed by a Board of Governors (Conseil de Gouvernance), the university’s major funding is provided by the state, although its third-party funding has increased rapidly and substantially. Ironically, while spatial mobility is everywhere supported, Luxembourg has invested considerable capital and strategic planning in establishing its own national university. It aims to compete globally by concentrating its intellectual and financial resources and by building on the country’s strengths and priorities. The state took this ambitious step in scientific capacity-building in founding a research-oriented university, in so doing also providing a stay-at-home alternative for Luxembourg’s youth, traditionally educated abroad. The long-standing custom of educating elites in other countries was ostensibly justified by the establishment of cosmopolitan, Europe-wide networks. Today, rising international competition and supranational coordination have increased pressure on Luxembourg to grow its higher education system and thus also foster educational and scientific innovation. The University provides a means to diversify the economy and to integrate citizens from diverse cultural background, while the polity remains dominated by local elites. Oriented towards the Grand Duchy’s unique context—small size, but simultaneously flourishing center of European governance and international business—the University was founded upon the principles of internationality, multilingualism, and interdisciplinarity. [less ▲]

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See detailHigher Education Systems and Institutions, Qatar
Crist, John T.; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Shin, J.C.; Teixeira, P. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of International Higher Education Systems and Institutions (in press)

The tertiary education sector in Qatar has grown very rapidly, viewed as key to national development on the path to the “knowledge society,” also to reduce its reliance on limited natural resources. The ... [more ▼]

The tertiary education sector in Qatar has grown very rapidly, viewed as key to national development on the path to the “knowledge society,” also to reduce its reliance on limited natural resources. The states of the Islamic world, with a significant but long-obscured past of scientific achievement, are witnessing a contemporary renaissance. The establishment of international offshore, satellite or branch campuses in the Persian or Arabian Gulf region emphasizes the dynamism of higher education development. With a history of several decades, Qatar’s higher education and science policies join contrasting strategies prevalent in capacity building attempts worldwide – to emulate the strongest global exemplars through importation as well as to cultivate local, indigenous assets. Thus, university-related and science policymaking on the peninsula has been designed to directly connect with global developments while building local capacity in higher education and scientific productivity [less ▲]

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See detailCorrector in random homogenization of elliptic equations in presence of long-range media
Lechiheb, Atef; Nourdin, Ivan UL; Zheng, Guangqu UL et al

in Probability and Mathematical Statistics (in press)

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See detailHow can we conceptualize behavioural addiction without pathologizing common behaviours?
Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel; Heeren, Alexandre; Schimmenti, Adriano et al

in Addiction (in press)

Following the recent changes to the diagnostic category for addictive disorders in DSM-5, it is urgent to clarify what constitutes behavioural addiction to have a clear direction for future research and ... [more ▼]

Following the recent changes to the diagnostic category for addictive disorders in DSM-5, it is urgent to clarify what constitutes behavioural addiction to have a clear direction for future research and classification. However, in the years following the release of DSM-5, an expanding body of research has increasingly classified engagement in a wide range of common behaviours and leisure activities as possible behavioural addiction. If this expansion does not end, both the relevance and the credibility of the field of addictive disorders might be questioned, which may prompt a dismissive appraisal of the new DSM-5 subcategory for behavioural addiction. We propose an operational definition of behavioural addiction together with a number of exclusion criteria, to avoid pathologizing common behaviours and provide a common ground for further research. The definition and its exclusion criteria are clarified and justified by illustrating how these address a number of theoretical and methodological shortcomings that result from existing conceptualizations. We invite other researchers to extend our definition under an Open Science Foundation framework. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 UL)