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See detailGender Gaps in Social Capital: A theoretical interpretation of the Italian evidence
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Addis, Elisabetta

E-print/Working paper (2016)

In this paper, we show that social capital accumulation along the life cycle is different for men and women. We discuss the concept of social capital and some problems connected to its definition and ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we show that social capital accumulation along the life cycle is different for men and women. We discuss the concept of social capital and some problems connected to its definition and measurement. We survey the literature on gender and social capital and use the Italian data of the “Multiscopo” Survey to assess differences in life cycle accumulation of social capital by sex and age. The lifecycle profile of social capital accumulation is gendered, with men accumulating more social capital at all ages, with a different peak and overall profile. We also show that, over 15 years, the gap in social capital by sex narrowed. Finally, we introduce a model of social capital structure compatible with the empirical evidence and with notions of gender as defined in feminist literature [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effect of Survey Design on Extreme Response Style: Rating Job Satisfaction
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Corrado, Luisa

E-print/Working paper (2016)

This paper explores the relationship between survey rating scale and Extreme Response Style (ERS) using experimental data from Understanding Society (Innovation Panel 2008), where a self-assessment ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the relationship between survey rating scale and Extreme Response Style (ERS) using experimental data from Understanding Society (Innovation Panel 2008), where a self-assessment questionnaire measuring job satisfaction uses two alternative (7 and 11 points) rating options. Our results suggests that when shifting from a shorter to a longer scale, the survey design generates a tendency to choose response scales at the extreme of the distribution, thus creating a misleading quantification of the variable of interest. The experimental design of the data enables us to test our hypothesis using a non-linear estimation approach where age, gender and education level are shown to affect ERS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (10 UL)
See detailBe Happy, Be Healthy! Exploring health outcomes among migrants using Italian microdata
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Claps, Enrico Rocco

Scientific Conference (2016, January 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (8 UL)
See detailSelection with temporary migration: the role of the ethnic networks
Joxhe, Majlinda UL

Presentation (2015, December)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 UL)
See detailDoes Isolation have a cost? Explaining the gender wage gap by the social capital gap with UK data
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Addis, Elisabetta

Presentation (2015, September)

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See detail“Gender Gaps in Social Capital: a theoretical interpretation of the Italian evidence”
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Addis, Elisabetta

Scientific Conference (2015, July)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailHow do migrants save? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey on temporary and permanent migrants versus natives
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe

in IZA Journal of Migration (2015), 4(11),

This paper investigates the saving behavior of migrants in the UK across different dimensions, i.e., comparing temporary versus permanent migrants and migrants versus natives. Established theoretical ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the saving behavior of migrants in the UK across different dimensions, i.e., comparing temporary versus permanent migrants and migrants versus natives. Established theoretical predictions show that migrants save more when they plan to stay in the destination only temporarily as target savers. Our empirical evidence takes into account the contemporaneous choice of savings and remittances. Moreover, when comparing the saving profiles of both natives and migrants, we uncover the weight of observable socio‐economic characteristics other than income and wealth. We use the British Household Panel Survey for the period 1991‐2008. The estimation results confirm that temporary migrants have a propensity to save 26 per cent higher than permanent migrants in UK. We also introduce an index of financial capability adjusted for income as an explanatory variable and, when employing the Blinder‐Oaxaca decomposition for the Tobit model of saving choice, migrants are more affected by observable social‐economic characteristics than natives. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (22 UL)
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See detailDirecting remittances to education with soft and hard commitments: Evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe; McKenzie, David et al

in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organisation (2015), 111

This paper tests how migrants’ willingness to remit changes when given the ability to direct remittances to educational purposes using different forms of commitment. Variants of a dictator game in a lab ... [more ▼]

This paper tests how migrants’ willingness to remit changes when given the ability to direct remittances to educational purposes using different forms of commitment. Variants of a dictator game in a lab-in-the-field experiment with Filipino migrants in Rome are used to examine remitting behavior under varying degrees of commitment. These range from the soft commitment of simply labeling remittances as being for education, to the hard commitment of having funds directly paid to a school and the student’s educational performance monitored. We find that the introduction of simple labeling for education raises remittances by more than 15%. Adding the ability to directly send this funding to the school adds only a further 2.2%. We randomly vary the information asymmetry between migrants and their most closely connected household, but find no significant change in the remittance response to these forms of commitment as information varies. Behavior in these games is then shown to be predictive of take-up of a new financial product called EduPay, designed to allow migrants to directly pay remittances to schools in the Philippines. We find this take-up is largely driven by a response to the ability to label remittances for education, rather than to the hard commitment feature of directly paying schools. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (9 UL)