Reference : Beyond fear appeals: Contradicting positive smoking outcome expectancies to influence...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Social, industrial & organizational psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/6760
Beyond fear appeals: Contradicting positive smoking outcome expectancies to influence smokers' implicit attitudes, perception, and behavior.
English
Glock, Sabine mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Languages, Culture, Media and Identities (LCMI) >]
Unz, Dagmar mailto [Cologne University, Germany]
Kovacs, Carrie mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Languages, Culture, Media and Identities (LCMI) >]
2012
Addictive Behaviors
Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
37
548-551
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0306-4603
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] Smoking ; Outcome expectancies ; Implicit attitudes ; Warning labels ; Public health
[en] Smokers often have (implicit or explicit) positive smoking outcome expectancies that motivate them to
smoke. For instance, they may feel that smoking is relaxing, that it improves concentration, or that it is
seen as cool and attractive by peers. These expectations are, for the most part, illusory. In order to counteract
these expectations, we designed cigarette package warning labels that contradicted common positive outcome
expectancies. We investigated the effectiveness of our new warning labels in two experiments. We
first measured smokers' implicit attitudes toward smoking using an affective priming method and found
that our new warning labels changed positive attitudes into ambivalent attitudes. We then tested whether
our warning labels changed smokers' self-reported positive outcome expectancies and smoking behavior.
Smokers presented with the new warning labels immediately associated positive outcome expectancies
less strongly with smoking and reported smoking fewer cigarettes in the 24 hours following the experiment.
Explicitly taking the reasons for unhealthy behavior into account when trying to change people's habits could
offer a valuable contribution to effective health campaigns.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/6760

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