Reference : Psychophysiologic effects of applied tension on the emotional fainting response to bl...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/4578
Psychophysiologic effects of applied tension on the emotional fainting response to blood and injury.
English
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Coles, Justine [> >]
Wardle, Jane [> >]
Steptoe, Andrew [> >]
2003
Behaviour research and therapy
Elsevier Science
41
139-155
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0005-7967
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] Applied Tension ; Diphasic response ; Blood phobia
[en] OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to investigate the psychophysiologic effects of "Applied Tension" (AT) on the emotional fainting response to blood and injury in a controlled experiment.
METHOD: Twenty-two persons reporting to generally feel faint or to have fainted at the sight of blood or injury and 22 participants classified as Non-Fainters were randomly allocated to a treatment or control condition. Psychophysiologic responses were continuously monitored while individuals watched a video depicting open-heart surgery and a control film. Prior to the surgery film, participants in the treatment condition were instructed in the use of AT.
RESULTS: All participants classified as Fainters showed a diphasic response pattern while watching the surgery film. This response, however, was significantly attenuated in Fainters in the treatment condition.
CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that AT provides an effective treatment strategy for the prevention of fainting responses in persons with a fear of blood and injury.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/4578
10.1016/S0005-7967(01)00133-4

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