Reference : Anticipatory effects of food exposure in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa.
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/4574
Anticipatory effects of food exposure in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa.
English
Legenbauer, Tanja [> >]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Rüddel, Heinz [> >]
2004
Appetite
Academic Press
42
33-40
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
0195-6663
[en] Bulimia nervosa ; Binge eating ; Cephalic phase responses
[en] Objective. To investigate cephalic phase responses (CPRs) in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa and to test the assumption that eating disordered individuals respond with more marked CPRs and higher increases in psychophysiological arousal to the presentation of food cues.
Method. Thirteen female inpatients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were compared to 15 non-eating disordered female volunteers. Participants were exposed to their preferred binge food in a single laboratory session with the possibility to eat immediately after the exposure trial.
Results. The results show greater salivation responses to food exposure and lower sympathetic arousal in patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa than in non-eating-disordered participants. Distress and feelings of tension and insecurity during food exposure were higher in patients compared to controls.
Discussion. These results support the hypothesis that anticipatory cephalic phase responses are more marked in eating disordered individuals and may therefore play a role in the maintenance of binge eating behavior.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/4574
10.1016/S0195-6663(03)00114-4

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