Reference : Time away from work predicts later cognitive function: Differences by activity during...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Multidisciplinary, general & others
Human health sciences : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/4536
Time away from work predicts later cognitive function: Differences by activity during leave
English
Leist, Anja mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) > ; Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, NL > Department of Public Health]
Glymour, M. Maria [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA > Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences > > ScD]
Mackenbach, Johan P. [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, NL > Department of Public Health > > MD, PhD]
van Lenthe, Frank J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, NL > Department of Public Health > > PhD]
Avendano, Mauricio [London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK > Department of Social Policy, LSE Health and Social Care > > PhD]
Aug-2013
Annals of Epidemiology
Elsevier Science
23
455-462
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1047-2797
1873-2585
New York
NY
[en] cognition ; cognitive reserve ; employment status ; work history ; Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe ; older adults
[en] Purpose. We sought to examine how different activities performed during employment gaps are associated with later cognitive function and change.
Method. Five cognitive measures were used to indicate cognitive impairment of 18,259 respondents to the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (age 50-73) in 2004/5 or 2006/7. Using complete employment histories, employment gaps of six months or more between ages 25 and 65 were identified.
Results. Controlling for early-life socioeconomic status, school performance, and education, higher risk of cognitive impairment was associated with employment gaps described as unemployment (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.18, 95 % Confidence Interval [CI] 1.04, 1.35) and sickness (OR = 1.78, 95 % CI 1.52, 2.09). In contrast, lower risk of cognitive impairment was associated with employment gaps described as training (OR = 0.73, 95 % CI 0.52, 1.01) or maternity (OR = 0.65, 95 % CI 0.57, 0.79). In longitudinal mixed effects models, training and maternity spells were associated with lower two-year aging-related cognitive decline.
Discussion. Periods away from work described as unemployment or sickness are associated with lower cognitive function, whereas maternity and training spells are associated with better late-life cognitive function. Both causation and selection mechanisms may explain these findings.
Fonds National de la Recherche - FnR
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/4536
10.1016/j.annepidem.2013.05.014
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1047279713001427
FP7 ; 235356 - ERA-AGE 2 - ERA-AGE Extension

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