Reference : Quality of life, emotion regulation, and heart rate variability in individuals with i...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Multidisciplinary, general & others
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/428
Quality of life, emotion regulation, and heart rate variability in individuals with intellectual disabilities and concomitant impaired vision
English
Meule, Adrian [University of Würzburg > Psychology]
Fath, Katharina [University of Würzburg > Psychology]
Real, Ruben [University of Würzburg > Psychology]
Sütterlin, Stefan mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Kübler, Andrea [University of Würzburg > Psychology]
Mar-2013
Psychology of Well-Being: Theory, Research and Practice
3
1
Yes
International
[en] Quality of life ; Emotion regulation ; Heart rate variability ; Cardiac autonomic regulation ; Intellectual disability ; Impaired vision
[en] Background: Positive associations have been found between quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and heart rate variability (HRV) in people without intellectual disabilities. However, emotion regulation and HRV have rarely been investigated in people with intellectual disabilities. Assessment of subjectively reported quality of life and emotion regulation strategies in this population is even more difficult when participants are also visually impaired.
Methods: Subjective and objective quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and HRV at rest were measured in a sample of people with intellectual disabilities and concomitant impaired vision (N = 35). Heart rate was recorded during a 10 min resting period. For the assessment of quality of life and emotion regulation, custom made tactile versions of questionnaire-based instruments were used that enabled participants to grasp response categories.
Results: The combined use of reappraisal and suppression as emotion regulation strategies was associated with higher HRV and quality of life. HRV was associated with objective quality of life only. Emotion regulation strategies partially mediated the relationship between HRV and quality of life.
Conclusions: Results replicate findings about associations between quality of life, emotion regulation, and HRV and extend them to individuals with intellectual disabilities. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that quality of life and emotion regulation could be assessed in such populations even with concomitant impaired vision with modified tactile versions of established questionnaires. HRV may be used as a physiological index to evaluate physical and affective conditions in this population.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/428
10.1186/2211-1522-3-1
www.psywb.com/content/3/1/1

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