Reference : Cardiac threat appraisal and depression after first myocardial infarction
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Treatment & clinical psychology
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/424
Cardiac threat appraisal and depression after first myocardial infarction
English
Vögele, Claus mailto [University of Luxembourg > Faculty of Language and Literature, Humanities, Arts and Education (FLSHASE) > Integrative Research Unit: Social and Individual Development (INSIDE) >]
Christ, Oliver [Department of Psychology, University of Marburg, Germany]
Spaderna, Heike [Department of Psychology, University of Mainz, Germany]
2012
Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG]
Switzerland Frontiers Research Foundation
3:365
1-12
Yes (verified by ORBilu)
International
1664-1078
Pully
Switzerland
[en] Myocardial Infarction ; Depression ; Cardiac Threat Appraisal ; Illness Adaptation ; Coping with myocardial infarction
[en] The present study investigated cardiac threat appraisal and its association with depression after first myocardial infarction (MI). A semi-structured interview allowing for DSM-IV-Axis I diagnoses was administered to 36 patients after first MI. Patients completed self-reports 5 to 15 days after the MI (time 1), 6 to 8 weeks later (time 2) and again 6 months later (time 3). Assessments at time 1 included indices of cardiac threat appraisal, locus of control, coping, and depression while at time 2 and time 3 only measures of depression were obtained. Cardiac threat appraisal was significantly correlated with depression at time 1, but was unrelated to depression scores at time 2 and time 3. Furthermore, there was a significant inverse association between cardiac threat appraisal and the subscales “search for affiliation” and "threat minimization" of the coping questionnaire. Additionally, “search for affiliation” correlated negatively with depression scores at time 1 and time 3, and "threat minimization" negatively with depression scores at time 1 and time 2. These results suggest a significant association between cardiac threat appraisal and depressive symptoms shortly after MI. Practical implications for treatment are discussed.
http://hdl.handle.net/10993/424
10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00365
Psychology for Clinical Settings (Special Issue on Psychocardiology)

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